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epub Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain, The download

by Irving Hexham

  • ISBN: 0310225523
  • Author: Irving Hexham
  • ePub ver: 1998 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1998 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Zondervan; 1st edition (April 1, 2001)
  • Formats: docx rtf lrf mbr
  • Category: Traveling
  • Subcategory: Europe
epub Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain, The download

Great guide to Christian sites in Great Britain.

Great guide to Christian sites in Great Britain. p. 13: Battle of Dyrham, near modern Bath, in 577 p. 15: Malcolm III defeated Macbeth and became King of Scotland p. 19: Cromwell defeated Charles II in a battle near Dunbar. Charles fled to France. 21: 1707 Act of Union p. 21: 1746 Battle of Culloden. ARCHITECTURE STYLES p. 43: Early Churches (to 800) p. 44: Romanesque Style (9th - 13th Century) - Durham Cathedral p. 45 Great guide to Christian sites in Great Britain.

Irving Hexham (born 14 April 1943) is a Canadian academic and writer who has published twenty-three books and numerous articles .

Currently, he is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, married to Dr. Karla Poewe who is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Calgary, and the father. The Christian Travelers Guide to France, (e. by Mark Konnert, Peter Barrs and Carine Barrs, 2001, pp. 224, ISBN 0310225884.

The Christian Travelers Guides deal directly with what even the best general travel guides only touch on: Christianity's . In rich detail and depth, The Christian Travelers Guide to Italy describes the history, literature, music, art, and architecture of Italy.

The Christian Travelers Guides deal directly with what even the best general travel guides only touch on: Christianity's enormous influence on Europe-and, through its history and culture, Europe's influence on Christianity. This unique series guides you on a pilgrimage to the heart of our Christian heritage.

Look at some of Irving Hexham's: Articles on Christian travel.

New: visit Charles Nienkirchen's Down Ancient Paths educational tours. Read some sample sections from the ChristianTravelers Guides. Look at some of Irving Hexham's: Articles on Christian travel.

In rich detail and depth, The Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain describes the history, literature, music, art . Hexham insists that Christians are "not a tribal religion rooted in local communities bound by kinship bonds" (p. 9) but should instead be a community grounded on faith.

In rich detail and depth, The Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain describes the history, literature, music, art, and architecture of Britain. The great truth of the New Testament is that Christians are children of God by adoption" (p. 9). And this explains why the scriptures "point to examples of faith which we are encouraged to follow and remember (Joshua 4; Luke 11:29-32; Acts 7; Hebrews 12).

The Christian Travelers Guides deal directly with what even the best general travel guides only touch on. .Books related to The Christian Travelers Guide to Italy. by David Bershad,Caroline Mangone,Irving Hexham. Christian Travelers Guide Series.

The Christian Travelers Guides deal directly with what even the best general travel guides only touch on: Christianity’s.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Christian Travelers Guide to Germany . Former Library books. Irving Hexham, Lothar Henry Kope.

Former Library books. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Показать все 3 объявления с подержанными товарами.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Irving Hexham books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain. Encountering New Religious Movements.

Travelers guide to. Italy. written by DAVID BERSHAD AND CAROLINA MANGONE. Our books are, we hope, a small contribution to the reestablishment of a sense of history and cultural pride among Christians. Following the biblical model, we believe that visiting places and seeing where great events took place help people remember and understand the present as well as the past (Joshua 4:1–7). The great truth of the New Testament is that Christians are children of God by adoption.

Visitors can become pilgrims with John Bunyan in his beloved Bedford, and see where John Wesley preached against slavery and converted thousands. Original.
Comments (2)

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A very interesting book that we are using as a supplement to other travel guides on an upcoming trip.
Kirimath
According to Irving Hexham, a distinguished professor of religious studies at the University of Calgary, one can find "travel guides with titles like Pagan Europe, Occult France, Magical Britain, and The Traveler's Guide to Germany" (p. 7), but not all that much on the Christian contribution to Europe, even or especially in standard travel books, which "tend to underplay Christian contributions to Western civilization through neglect or a negative tone" (p. 7). In an effort to correct this situation, Hexham has generated a series of guidebooks that includes, in addition to the one he wrote on Great Britain, books on Germany, France, and Italy.

The reasons Hexham gives for his efforts should resonate with Latter-day Saints because they, too, have come to recognize that

the Bible is steeped in history and the remembrance of history. Both the Old and New Testaments constantly reminded their readers about particular historical events (Deuteronomy 4:9--25) both by retelling the story and through commemorations which enact the central acts of salvation (Exodus 13:3--16; 1 Corinthians 11:25--26). Further, an appeal is frequently made to visible memorials that remind people of God's wonderful deeds (Acts 2:29--36). We also find both Jews and early Christians visiting historical sites as acts of devotion (Luke 2:21--41; Acts 21:17--27). (p. 8)

Hexham insists that Christians are "not a tribal religion rooted in local communities bound by kinship bonds" (p. 9) but should instead be a community grounded on faith. "The great truth of the New Testament is that Christians are children of God by adoption" (p. 9). And this explains why the scriptures "point to examples of faith which we are encouraged to follow and remember (Joshua 4; Luke 11:29--32; Acts 7; Hebrews 12). Remembering acts of courage and obedience to God strengthens our own faith. This fact was long recognized by the leaders of the church. Throughout history, Christians have told and retold stories of courage and faith" (p. 9).

But now much of this has been neglected or forgotten. In its place we have what Hexham calls "secular gossip." By this he means what appears in the mass media--on television and the radio and in magazines. We are inundated with bizarre stories of the (mis)deeds of "celebrities." So we "are full of 'lives.' But they are the lives of pop singers, film stars, television personalities, and secular politicians" (p. 9), and not the lives of the heroic figures of Christian faith, as was once the case. This fact deeply troubles Hexham. Why?

Christianity is rooted in history. The New Testament begins with a genealogical table that most modern readers find almost incomprehensible (Matthew 1:1--17). The purpose of this genealogy is to locate the birth of Jesus in space and time according to the standards of Jewish history. The appeal to 'the first eye-witnesses,' in the prologue to the gospel of Luke, is also intended to engage the skepticism of Greco-Roman readers by providing specific historical data against which ancient readers could weigh the writer's claims (Luke 3:1--2). The Gospels contain many references to historical data and specific geographical locations. So important is historical truth that its denial becomes the mark of heresy. (p. 8)

According to Hexham, "the importance of history and the way in which we remember past events is recognized by many influential opponents of Christianity" (p. 8). He then points out that the most determined enemies of Christianity (he mentions Karl Marx and Adolf Hitler) made the control of history, or of its interpretation, the key to controlling the future (p. 8). In this manner they built in one way or another, Hexham believes, on Enlightenment skepticism about divine things. This has led, he believes, to the denial "of the validity of Christians history" (p. 8). But following the biblical model with its emphasis on remembrance, Hexham believes that "visiting places and seeing where great events took place help people remember and understand the present as well as the past" (p. 8). Hexham has fashioned these travel guides with this end in mind: the great deeds of the Christian past are worthy of remembering and can still enhance the faith of those who now travel the world. But can close encounters with the places where terrible deeds were done in the name of Jesus Christ, since this is often part of the larger story, also enhance or refine faith? For a Latter-day Saint, the answer has to be yes.

The Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain is not, of course, an exhaustive account. But it provides in the first part a very useful brief account of British history and in the second part an explanation of English literature, art, music, and architecture, followed by a description of fifty-eight sites like London, York, and Cambridge. This volume, and the others in this series, can be recommended for Latter-day Saints with an urge to actually learn something about what they are seeing while on holiday.

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