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epub How to Read a Nautical Chart : A Complete Guide to the Symbols, Abbreviations, and Data Displayed on Nautical Charts download

by Nigel Calder

  • ISBN: 0071376151
  • Author: Nigel Calder
  • ePub ver: 1956 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1956 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 240
  • Publisher: International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press; 1 edition (August 5, 2002)
  • Formats: azw doc lit txt
  • Category: Transportation
  • Subcategory: Transportation
epub How to Read a Nautical Chart : A Complete Guide to the Symbols, Abbreviations, and Data Displayed on Nautical Charts download

All in all, I found reading How To Read A Nautical Chart a very interesting and valuable experience

All in all, I found reading How To Read A Nautical Chart a very interesting and valuable experience. This book gets great marks from everyone so I figured when I wanted to learn how to read a nautical chart, this was the go-to book. First, the book has a lot of information.

Much chart data is still derived from much earlier surveys, and even recent surveys will suffer from the distortions caused by the . An intro to reading nautical charts. Probably one still needs the guidance of an old-hand.

Much chart data is still derived from much earlier surveys, and even recent surveys will suffer from the distortions caused by the difference between the global datum and the actual shape of the earth. None of this caused a really acute problem in the time before GPS. Navigators knew that their own ability to determine their position was worse than any inaccuracies in their charts, and so steered very well clear of any charted hazards  .

Chapman Nautical Chart No. 1: The Essential Guide to Chart Reading and Navigation United States . Fernhurst Books Limited. Open Canoe Technique: A Complete Guide to Paddling the Open Canoe Nigel Foster Author. 1: The Essential Guide to Chart Reading and Navigation United States United States Coast Guard Author. CJ.

He is the author of seven books, including Nigel Calder's Cruising Handbook and Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual, and has written . How to Grow Old a Middle Aged Man Moaning John Bishop Hardcover 14 Nov 2019.

He is the author of seven books, including Nigel Calder's Cruising Handbook and Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Manual, and has written more than 300 articles for magazines such as SAIL, Ocean Navigator, and Cruising World. Country of Publication.

informative and enjoyable.

Now Chart No. 1 is not just reborn but expanded and improved in How to Read a Nautical Chart. The demand for a book like this has never been greater. informative and enjoyable.

The classic How to Read a Nautical Chart explains every aspect of electronic and paper nautical charts: how a chart is assembled, how to gauge the accuracy of chart data, how to read charts created by other governments, how to use information such as scale, projection technique.

The classic How to Read a Nautical Chart explains every aspect of electronic and paper nautical charts: how a chart is assembled, how to gauge the accuracy of chart data, how to read charts created by other governments, how to use information such as scale, projection technique and datum that every chart contains; how not to get fooled or run aground by overzooming. Nigel Calder teaches you how to squeeze every ounce of information out of a nautical chart (on your GPS, chartplotter, or nav station) and understand the limits of accuracy for all charts, paper and electronic, raster and vector.

Nautical charts - Symbols. The best handbook on chart usage, from one of the most trusted names in boating. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Includes bibliographical references (page 231) and indexes. cut off text due to tight binding. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station21. cebu on April 29, 2019. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Mapping the Sea and Airways by Martyn Bramwell. Describes the history of sea and air navigation, including the various instruments used in navigating and current techniques of making sea and air charts. How to Read a Nautical Chart: A Complete Guide to the Symbols, Abbreviations, and Data Displayed on Nautical Charts by Nigel Calder. Tools of Navigation: A Kid's Guide to the History and Science of Finding Your Way by Rachel Dickinson. The Story of Maps and Navigation by Anita Ganeria

As a newbie to reading charts I soon realized that much of the information displayed on a nautical chart is difficult or imposable to decode without some reference outside of the chart itself. This book does a beautiful job of explaining all the mysterious symbols and conventions.

As a newbie to reading charts I soon realized that much of the information displayed on a nautical chart is difficult or imposable to decode without some reference outside of the chart itself. It also has a great introduction that puts chart creation and interpretation into a practical, real-world perspective. I would consider this book to be a vital part of any vessel's safety equipment. What does 'rky' mean? Oops!"

A Complete Guide to Using and Understanding Electronic and Paper Charts.

A Complete Guide to Using and Understanding Electronic and Paper Charts.

The best handbook on chart usage, from one of the most trusted names in boating

In 2000, the U.S. government ceased publication of Chart No. 1, the invaluable little book that generations of mariners have consulted to make sense of the complex system of signs, symbols, and graphic elements used in nautical charts. Now Chart No. 1 is not just reborn but expanded and improved in How to Read a Nautical Chart. The demand for a book like this has never been greater.

Arranged and edited by Nigel Calder, one of today's most respected boating authors, --and containing four-color illustrations throughout,-- How to Read a Nautical Chart presents a number of original features that help readers make optimum use of the data found in Chart No. 1, including a more intuitive format, crucial background information, international chart symbol equivalents, electronic chart symbology, and thorough explanations of the practical aspects of nautical chart reading.

Comments (7)

Yahm
How To Read A Nautical Chart by Nigel Calder is not a normal book.

Most of us sailors think that we can read a nautical chart. Nigel states in his introduction that after thirty years of reading and collecting nautical charts, he thought he pretty much knew how to read a chart. After doing the research for this book, he learned a whole lot more about reading charts. And this is from a man who has created charts of Belize and Cuba for his cruising guides.

He starts by delving lightly into the history of charts, and then covers how charts were made before aerial and later satellite photography. He point outs out that old-time surveyors could, if they took their time and cared about accuracy, could produce amazingly accurate charts and maps. A survey made of the US in 1927 is never inaccurate by no more than 160 feet from Kansas to the East coast!

He then points out that while new charts are often ‘corrected’ by aerial or satellite photography, the survey work (i.e. depth soundings) are often ancient. For example, the ‘newest’ soundings of Honduras were made in 1835, 26 years before the War Between the States! In fact, the only soundings ever taken in most of the Indian Ocean were made by Captain James Cook in the 1700’s. Even today, more than 50% of the soundings on charts issued by NOAA and the British Admiralty (the two main providers of nautical charts) are taken from sounding poles or lead lines, not sonar. This means that projections can be sticking up that are not found until someone hits them. This happened to the liner Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1992, when she hit an unmarked seafloor projection off the US coast. He also points out that things change over time. For example, most coral reefs grow about 16 feet vertically every 100 years, meaning that with many soundings over 100 years old, depths in tropical regions are often very inaccurate today!

Another interesting item Nigel brings up is that some hydrographic agencies (British Admirality, Canadian, and Cuban, for example) require that companies that sell their charts bring them up to date before sale, while others, like NOAA, have no such requirements.

Nigel then provides an interesting discussion of the limits of accuracy, both vertical and horizontal, and even a full page discourse on why your GPS says you are 24 feet below the earth when you are sailing along the surface. Lastly in this section, he talk about the different projections used in making charts, Mercator and Gonomic, and when to use which. He also talks about the differences between NOAA charts, NIMA charts (US charts of foreign areas), British Admirality charts, and the privately made charts of Stanfords and those made by Imray, Laurie, Norie and Wilson. Lastly, and most importantly, he describes why Latitude and Longitude readings from your GPS sometimes differ from those shown on charts.

In the next section, Nigel introduces us to some of the symbology used in charts. He especially points out that no country or company (except the French) completely follows all the standards devised by the IHO (International Hydrography Organization). However, as the IHO standards allow for ‘national requirements, reflecting a country’s needs or preferences, to introduce minor variations into the specifications’, this is acceptable. For example, NOAA charts are still largely produced in imperial (feet and/or fathoms) units rather than metric. Also, many charts use a different color coding system to identify shallow or deep water, rather than the IHO standard.

Now, Nigel comes to the meat of the book. The IHO specifies that all chart symbols are divided into sections, labeled A through T. Section A is called the General section, and this covers the non-cartographic information on the chart, such as title, numbering scheme, margin notes, and notes on the charts. Section C deals with nautical features, Section I with depths, section Q with bouys and beacons, etc. Nigel discusses each section in detail, with examples from real charts plus the symbology used on all the major ‘brands’ of charts.

All in all, I found reading How To Read A Nautical Chart a very interesting and valuable experience. I would rate it 4.75 stars (out of 5), the only thing lacking was a way to better correlate his text to the associated maps, and a side-by-side comparison of a NOAA, British Admiralty, and possibly a private chart of the exact same area.
Acebiolane
This book gets great marks from everyone so I figured when I wanted to learn how to read a nautical chart, this was the go-to book. Not so much.

First, the book has a lot of information. Reviewers with a lot more navigational experience than me (I have none) think this book has everything you need to know. I don't doubt that. I'm sure the author's knowledge is expansive and beyond reproach. The issue I have is in the layout and delivery.

As I stated, I'm entirely new to navigation. This book is not a good place to start. The author immediately jumps into the variations in latitude and longitudnal (is that a word?) accuracy. That seems like it should be the last chapter -- i.e. exceptions to the rule, as opposed to leading with it. So right off, for someone new, this book dives into the weeds. Just doesn't seem right.

After that, the flow of the book is a little better and there is a ton of information to digest. Some practical, some historical, some excessive for the beginner. Again, it's a personal preference and I would have liked to have gotten the very basics early in the book and then build off of that. This book is more like drinking from a firehose -- getting all the detail thrown at you at once, consume what you can.

Bottom line: Ton of information on chart reading. I assume it's accurate and good information, it's just not easy to digest. If you are a beginner, I would recommend starting with a different book. I haven't found that book yet but I know it's not this one. After learning the basics, I believe this is probably 'the book' to own as a reference and for continued learning.
Dagdardana
All Calders books are well written, some of them are outstanding, some are used for training manuals. This book will teach you a great deal about nautical charts that you never knew. It is an important read for hawse pipe professional mariners and for serious offshore sailors and sport fishermen. Reading this book will make you a more careful mariner.
Kahavor
Book as advertised. Very good condition.
The Sinners from Mitar
A little useful but not that much for the cruising sailor. More a history of cartography and the difficulty in adapting various surveys to global positioning. The title is a tad misleading in my opinion.
Cordabor
This book is essential if you're serious about learning to navigate with charts. There's some history of chartmaking and it includes the complete Chart 1 publication, which is an explanation/guide on how to read all the charts.

This is a book that should be on all boats that navigate the waterways.
Ariseym
Llegó en perfectas condicciones.
This book should be subtitled "More than you ever thought there was to learn about navigating with the benefit of nautical charts." Very well done, but there's a dearth of text--it's mostly page after page of all the possible symbols one might ever see on a nautical chart. It is an exhaustive work on the subject!

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