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by Jeff Connor

  • ISBN: 0007208081
  • Author: Jeff Connor
  • ePub ver: 1272 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1272 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: HarperSport (February 26, 2010)
  • Formats: lrf rtf txt docx
  • Category: Sport
  • Subcategory: Soccer
epub The Lost Babes download

The Lost Babes" is a fascinating look at the ill fated Munich plane crash that decimated Manchester United's football team in 1958.

BBC History Magazine. A fascinating memoir' The Times. The Lost Babes" is a fascinating look at the ill fated Munich plane crash that decimated Manchester United's football team in 1958.

A moving story of how a legendary football team was lost to tragedy - and how this disaster irrevocably altered the lives of the survivors and the bereaved families, and ultimately brought shame on the biggest football club in the world. The Manchester United team Matt Busby had built in the fifties from the club's successful youth policy seemed destined to dominate football for many years. Such was the power of the ‘Busby Babes’ that they seemed invincible. The average age of the side which won the Championship in 1955–56 was just 22, the youngest ever.

The Babes’ precocity, however, did not go down too well with some of the other sides around at the time. Manchester United’s main rivals for honours in the mid-Fifties were Wolverhampton Wanderers, led by the elegant England captain Billy Wright and Bolton, who were, as now, the Old Trafford bogey team. The Street, before double glazing, Thai brides, drug abuse, kidnapping and murder arrived forty years later, was all urban banality. It offered a composite of grey, gloomy streets, gossipy neighbours, ghettos of close relatives-but oddly in the baby boomers era no children-and an existence that revolved around the local pub.

The Lost Babes : Manchester United and the Forgotten Victims of Munich . By (author) Jeff Connor. Covering a lot of ground, this splendid book provides a fascinating insight into many of those affected by the tragedy' Winger. BBC History Magazine. fascinating memoir' The Times show more. Jeff Connor is a sports correspondent for the Mail on Sunday.

Jeff Connor traces the rise of the greatest Manchester United side of all time, alongside a vibrant portrait of England in the 1950s, but he also paints a dark picture of a club that enriched itself on the myth of Munich while neglecting the families of the dead and the surviving players. The repercussions and the toll the disaster took on so many linger to the present day.

Jeff Whitefoot was a Babe and is still one of the youngest to play for United at sixteen. Him, Brian Birch, Bob Birkett, an outside right who played for England schoolboys, Mark Jones, they were really the first of them, Jackie Blanchflower, then Dave Pegg and me; Foulkesy the following year. I was born in Stretford, just behind the Gorsehill Hotel, and then we moved to Rackhouses. They came to my house in Baguley after they had seen me play for Manchester Boys and I was an illegal signing because I hadn’t finished school. Jeff Whitefoot was in the office and I joined him there, answering the phone, helping Les Olive with bits and pieces, training in the morning.

Similar tributes appeared at the resting-places of the other seven lost players in various parts of Manchester, Salford, Doncaster and Barnsley.

And to my mother Nancy, who had to put up with all three of us. Table of Contents. Similar tributes appeared at the resting-places of the other seven lost players in various parts of Manchester, Salford, Doncaster and Barnsley.

Jeff Connor is rugby correspondent for the Mail on Sunday. Pointless, A Season with Britain's Worst Football Team', will be published by Headline in 2005. Country of Publication.

The bachelor Babes inevitably had more problems filling the time between training than the married men like Byrne. For the majority of the Busby Babes, the first trip abroad, and their first flight, was to an international youth tournament in Zurich in May 1954. When the fare offered by cinemas, cafés and snooker tables of Manchester had been exhausted, one afternoon venue which earned brief popularity, particularly on a Sunday, was Ringway Airport, south of the city on the edge of the Cheshire countryside. The party was led by Busby and Murphy, supported by Bert Whalley and Arthur Powell, a groundsman who was also a qualified St John’s Ambulanceman.

A moving story of how a legendary football team was lost to tragedy – and how this disaster irrevocably altered the lives of the survivors and the bereaved families, and ultimately brought shame on the biggest football club in the world.

The Manchester United team Matt Busby had built in the fifties from the club's successful youth policy seemed destined to dominate football for many years. Such was the power of the ‘Busby Babes’ that they seemed invincible. The average age of the side which won the Championship in 1955-56 was just 22, the youngest ever to achieve such a feat. A year later, when they were Champions again, nothing, it seemed, would prevent this gifted young team from reigning for the next decade.

But then came 6 February 1958, the day that eight Manchester United players died on a German airfield in the 'Munich Air Disaster' – a date to be forever etched in the annals of sporting tragedy.

Duncan Edwards, Eddie Colman, Tommy Taylor, Roger Byrne…the names were already enshrined in legend before the air crash, but Munich in many ways earned them immortality. They have never grown old.

Jeff Connor traces the rise of the greatest Manchester United side of all time, alongside a vibrant portrait of England in the 1950s, but he also paints a dark picture of a club that enriched itself on the myth of Munich while neglecting the families of the dead and the surviving players. The repercussions and the toll the disaster took on so many linger to the present day.

Drawing on extensive interviews with the Munich victims and players of that era, The Lost Babes is the definitive account of British football's golden age, a poignant story of the protracted effects of loss and a remorseless dissection of the how the richest football club in the world turned its back on its own players and their families.

Comments (4)

skyjettttt
Great book, and full of pictures of the "old" team.
Naktilar
thank you :)
Funky
"The Lost Babes" is a fascinating look at the ill fated Munich plane crash that decimated Manchester United's football team in 1958. Rather than a book that is an in-depth account of the tragic plane crash, this covers the teams rise under manager Matt Busby and the introduction to a core group of young players that came to define Busby's Babes.

Connor's focus is on the treatment of the families of the victims of the Munich crash, along with the players who never fully recovered physically, and became of "limited" value to ManU given their diminished football skills. As an American, I'm certainly not familiar enough with all the details to know how fair and accurate Connor's account is. However, it is disappointing and concerning to think about the seemingly careless disregard the club has shown for the victim's and their families. It is easy to see this as a byproduct of the time and certainly both society and professional sports clubs thinking and approach to dealing with tragedy has advanced quite a bit since 1958. So in some sense, as I read this book, I "forgave" ManU's poor handling of the victims. However, as years passed and norms had changed, it would have been great to see the club step up to the plate and recognize the concerns the victims families and surving players had that left some bitter wounds. The club certainly did nothing to diminish the mystique and sympathy that this tragedy ultimately bestowed upon them and how it certainly advanced their popularity (along with their subsequent football championships) to the point of being one of the world's most reknowned and wealthy sports teams.

"The Lost Babes" is a fascinating read, one that leaves you feeling somber and reflective. It certainly isn't the most well-written football book, but it does effectively shed light on a different and less known side of this unfortunate disaster.

"The Lost Babes"
Wel
A thoroughly moving book that is a must read for all sports fans. I cannot believe that a huge club with the resources they have at their disposal have not compensated the victims of this disaster by other than a paltry amount. Thanks to the author for bringing this out into the open, they should be extremely ashamed. A disaster that will forever live in my memory.

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