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epub The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football download

by John J. Miller

  • ISBN: 0061744506
  • Author: John J. Miller
  • ePub ver: 1898 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1898 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 272
  • Publisher: Harper; 1st Edition edition (April 12, 2011)
  • Formats: mobi mbr azw lit
  • Category: Sport
  • Subcategory: Miscellaneous
epub The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football download

President Roosevelt did save football. John J. Miller did a fine job of reporting the evolution of college football-all football, really

President Roosevelt did save football. I heard how Roosevelt's actions saved the game and thorough his actions the NCAA was founded. It is an excellent book and it well be enjoyed by the football fan as well as the armchair historian. Miller did a fine job of reporting the evolution of college football-all football, really. While even the most casual observer of the college game is familiar with how Teddy Roosevelt called the powers that be to the White House and essentially said, "Clean up the game or there won't be a game," what Mr. Miller did was shed light on "the rest of the story," to quote Paul Harvey.

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Look back at football’s brutal beginnings and President Theodore Roosevelt’s quest to save the sport from abolition. At the turn of the 20th century, America’s football gridirons were killing fields. The college game drew tens of thousands of spectators and rivaled professional baseball in fan appeal, but football in the early 1900s was lethally brutal-a grinding, bruising sport in which the forward pass was illegal and brute strength was required to move the ball. Players locked arms in mass formations and used their helmetless heads as battering rams

John J. Miller delivers the intriguing, never-before-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt saved American Football-a game that would become the nation’s most popular sport

John J. Miller delivers the intriguing, never-before-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt saved American Football-a game that would become the nation’s most popular sport. Miller’s sweeping, novelistic retelling captures the violent, nearly lawless days of late 19th century football and the public outcry that would have ended the great game but for a crucial Presidential intervention.

John Joseph Miller (born 1970) is an American author, journalist and educator. The Big Scrum: How Teddy Roosevelt Saved Football (2011, ISBN 0-06-174450-6).

He founded The College Fix, a conservative higher education watchdog Works.

John J.

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It was the first game Roosevelt, then an 18-year-old Harvard freshman, ever attended, and it propelled him into a lifelong love of the sport. Its physical dangers, he thought, helped build character

Updated April 21, 2011 12:01 am ET. Football is in trouble. Perhaps the sport needs a modern Teddy Roosevelt.

Updated April 21, 2011 12:01 am ET. NFL owners have locked out the players, meaning that the upcoming season could be cancelled. Even if the games go on, a lingering dispute over head injuries has saddled the sport with a messy controversy. A century ago, he waded into a fight over violence in football and possibly saved the game-if not from extinction, then at least from relegation to second-tier status in the world of athletics. To Read the Full Story.

He's also director of the Dow Journalism Program at Hillsdale College - and a proud fan of his college team, the M.

John J. Miller delivers the intriguing, never-before-told story of how Theodore Roosevelt saved American Football—a game that would become the nation’s most popular sport. Miller’s sweeping, novelistic retelling captures the violent, nearly lawless days of late 19th century football and the public outcry that would have ended the great game but for a crucial Presidential intervention. Teddy Roosevelt’s championing of football led to the creation of the NCAA, the innovation of the forward pass, a vital collaboration between Walter Camp, Charles W. Eliot, John Heisman and others, and, ultimately, the creation of a new American pastime. Perfect for readers of Douglas Brinkley’s Wilderness Warrior, Michael Lewis’s The Blind Side, and Conn and Hal Iggulden’s The Dangerous Book for Boys, Miller’s The Big Scrum reclaims from the shadows of obscurity a remarkable story of one defining moment in our nation’s history.

Comments (7)

Vathennece
Mr. Miller did a wonderful job for this book. His research was excellent. President Roosevelt was very wise when he wanted to reform the game. While he instigated the process he stepped back and let the leaders develop rules that led to a better game and provided better safety measures for its players. The book's title is very correct. President Roosevelt did save football. I heard how Roosevelt's actions saved the game and thorough his actions the NCAA was founded. It is an excellent book and it well be enjoyed by the football fan as well as the armchair historian.
KiddenDan
John J. Miller did a fine job of reporting the evolution of college football--all football, really. While even the most casual observer of the college game is familiar with how Teddy Roosevelt called the powers that be to the White House and essentially said, "Clean up the game or there won't be a game," what Mr. Miller did was shed light on "the rest of the story," to quote Paul Harvey. As much as a student of the game as I like to think I am, I never fully realized just how involved Teddy was way before the famous meeting. It was a matter of years, and Mr. Miller did an excellent job bringing that to light. He also took off on meaningful tangets--Teddy's youth, Harvard's Eliot's objection to the game, etc., etc., etc. The book was referred to as a yarn. That it was, but an interesting and informative yarn. Perhaps we need another Teddy Roosevelt to clean up the revenue-driven, non-academic game college football has become. If Teddy is looking down on college football (nearly all sports, really), he can't be pleased to see what he help do become so undone. If you care about college football, other than just attending (or watching on TV) game, you owe it to yourself to read this book.
Jim Campbell
Golkree
Very interesting book covering the era before the forward pass was made legal and football was more like rugby with mass running plays, no protective gear and significant injury issues. Amazingly enough some college games pre-WWI were played before 40,000 fans. This was an era when "men were men" and football was unabashedly credited with preparing men for service in war. A fascinating glimpse into a period of American history long since gone. Short and a fast read.
Anararius
I bought this hoping for a look at the early days of the game, and while that certainly is a part of the book, it lacked any deep analysis on that front, instead presenting a survey of the development, interspersed with the crib notes of a Teddy Roosevelt biography, culminating in a somewhat anti-climactic finish about TR helping to bring about reforms in the game. I certainly enjoyed the book, and ripped right through it, but it really just left me wanting to read more about those years in the sport's history.
Jonariara
I suck at book reviews but my roommate is an author and he loves reading reviews for his book, so I figured John Miller might like it too.
There are so many books on the Progressive Era of the United States, but only a few on how it influenced America's #1 sport.

On page 78 there's a typo that reads: "The Princeton-Yale game in 1778 drew four thousand spectators"

Should read 1878 not 1778.

But I digress. Miller gives a year by year breakdown of the history of football which he describes as a slow evolution from its days as essentially a game of soccer, to a hybrid of rugby and soccer, and its rules amendments that divorced it from Rugby. Goes heavily into detail about Roosevelt's influence with Walter Camp's football committee and his condemnation of progressives who wanted to legislate the sport out of existence. Their attempts would fail but Miller makes a connection to the pressure they put on the sport to either change its ways (read about the 1905 season) or else it will lose the support of the public.

Would recommend this book to anyone.
Moonworm
Great review of the early history of football. Every football fan should read this book and add it to his library. The more I read about Teddy Roosevelt the more I believe he really does deserve to be on Mount Rushmore. TR’s efforts aside, the book deserves high accolades.
Nten
This book not only offers insight into a crucial point in time in the development of the great game of football, it also offers a great insight into a crucial point in time in american history. This book is really well written, great flowing language and a great mix of urban legends and historical facts.
I highly recommend this book, not only to those of you interested in football, but also those interested in american history, and even those of you interested in great historical literature in general.
So many things covered here, and covered so well. A great read for football history fans, Teddy fans, college football fans and more! Excellently, stylishly written too.

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