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by Steven B. Smith

  • ISBN: 0300076657
  • Author: Steven B. Smith
  • ePub ver: 1934 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1934 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 288
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (October 11, 1998)
  • Formats: lit lrf doc lrf
  • Category: Spirituality
  • Subcategory: Religious Studies
epub Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity download

Steven B. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new conception of the emancipated individual. Spinoza, Liberalism, and. has been added to your Cart.

Steven B. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new . His recent publications include Spinoza, Liberalism, and Jewish Identity, Spinoza's Book of Life, and Reading Leo Strauss. Books by Steven B. Smith. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new conception of the emancipated individu Baruch de Spinoza (1632-1677)-often recognized as the first modern Jewish thinker-was also a founder of modern liberal political philosophy. This book is the first to connect systematically these two aspects of Spinoza's legacy.

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Heroes of Invention: Technology, Liberalism and British Identity 1750–1914. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Spinoza, Liberalism and the Question of Jewish Identity. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997 Book InformationIslam in Black America: Identity, Liberation, and Difference in African-American Islamic Thought. Islam in Black America: Identity, Liberation, and Difference in African-American Islamic Thought Edward E. Curtis IV State University of New York Press 2002 168 . By Edward E. Curtis. IV. State University of New York Press. Heroes of Invention: Technology, Liberalism and British Identity 1750–1914.

Jewish identity began to gain the attention of Jewish sociologists in the United States with the publication of Marshall Sklare's "Lakeville studies". Yale University Press, 1997. Among other topics explored in the studies was Sklare's notion of a "good Jew". The "good Jew" was essentially an idealized form of Jewish identity as expressed by the Lakeville respondents. Galatians 6:11, Romans 16:22, Colossians 4:18, 2 Thessalonians 3:17.

book by Steven B. Baruch de Spinoza (1632-1677)-often recognized as the first modern Jewish thinker-was also a founder of modern liberal political philosophy .

Steven Smith's lucid and compelling argument for writing Spinoza into the political theory canon is also a. .

An important book, elevating Spinoza to a deserved place beside Hobbes and Locke as one of the founders of modern political philosophy and showing the importance of 'the Jewish Question' for the whole meaning of modern liberalism.

Smith, Steven B. Bibliographic Citation. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1997. Spinoza's Heresy: Immortality and the Jewish Mind . Nadler, Steven (2001). Related Items in Google Scholar. Весь DSpace Сообщества и коллекции Авторы Названия By Creation Date Эта коллекция Авторы Названия By Creation Date.

Hajnal et al. The Parties in Our Heads: Misperceptions about Party Composition and Their Consequences. Ahler et al. Political Homophily in Social Relationships: Evidence from Online Dating Behavior. Huber et al. Evaluating the Conflict-Reducing Effect of UN Peacekeeping Operations.

Baruch de Spinoza (1632-1677)―often recognized as the first modern Jewish thinker―was also a founder of modern liberal political philosophy. This book is the first to connect systematically these two aspects of Spinoza's legacy. Steven B. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new conception of the emancipated individual, a thinker who decisively influenced such diverse movements as the Enlightenment, liberalism, and political Zionism.Focusing on Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise, Smith argues that Spinoza was the first thinker of note to make the civil status of Jews and Judaism (what later became known as the Jewish Question) an essential ingredient of modern political thought. Before Marx or Freud, Smith notes, Spinoza recast Judaism to include the liberal values of autonomy and emancipation from tradition. Smith examines the circumstances of Spinoza's excommunication from the Jewish community of Amsterdam, his skeptical assault on the authority of Scripture, his transformation of Mosaic prophecy into a progressive philosophy of history, his use of the language of natural right and the social contract to defend democratic political institutions, and his comprehensive comparison of the ancient Hebrew commonwealth and the modern commercial republic. According to Smith, Spinoza's Treatise represents a classic defense of religious toleration and intellectual freedom, showing them to be necessary foundations for political stability and liberal regimes. In this study Smith examines Spinoza's solution to the Jewish Question and asks whether a Judaism, so conceived, can long survive.
Comments (4)

Hanelynai
I read everything available by and about Spinoza so I had to read this.

I get the feeling the author was not really aware of Spinoza's identity but simply used a shallow view of who Spinoza was to launch into his own views. He's not the only author to do this. Antonio Damasio does the same thing in the title of one of his books.Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain

So far I have not found any books about spinoza I would recommend. The only books I would recommend would be books BY spinoza, Unfortunately they are very difficult to read, but its better than getting misdirected.

I would recommend the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy which has a number of entries on Spinoza including his Psychology which was great, and free online!, and the idea of Neutral Monism which clarified some things for me, though I think the authors of that missed Spinoza's point a little. The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy also has good entries.

I believe Spinoza is poorly understood when we think of him as a commentator on Jewish Identity, or as mainly a footnote to Descartes. If Spinoza is a footnote to anyone it would be Plato (expanding on the idea of Essences of Things) and of Thomas Aquinas. Someone should write some books comparing Spinoza's writing to certain books by Plato and ALL books by Aquinas! In fact I would go so far as to say Spinoza has more to say about Christianity than about the cultural identity of Judaism. Anyone who has read Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise will know what I am talking about. There Spinoza does not describe Christianity or Jesus in any detail but clearly sees Christianity as a positive direction in the relationship between God and humanity as far as the extent of "revealed religion" by way of prophets goes. To fully understand Spinoza you must grasp both the message in T-PT and The Ethics, and the distinction between the Revealed relationship with God which is very simple and based on Love Your Neighbor, and the Philospher's relationship with God which requires a much deeper mode of perception, type three perception. This explains most or all of Aquinas' work...

If you are curious about Spinoza, the Man, the human who had his heart broken by a young lady, then read Spinoza: A Life
Here you will see how Spinoza was traumatized not only by being expelled from his own community but also by having his fiance choose another man. I believe you can read into the later chapters of The Ethics when he is describing the Emotions, and see which emotions he actually wrestled with--anger, hate and love at the same time for the same person, and so forth. It's almost as if his early tragedies made possible the deep dramatic insights he had and shared in The Ethics. So its sad and blessed at the same time.
cyrexoff
Wonderfully clear and comprehensive. Smith is the great Explicator.
Kekinos
Overall, Professor Smith wrote a well thought out and well written work. I give him 4 **** rather than 5 to distinguish myself from the other reviewer, and to register a protest against a mild bias, which i found only at the very beginning and end of the book.

Smith gives a great summary of Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise. He confirms what i have thought/suspected for years, that Spinoza is pretty much at the source of the liberal destruction of Western culture, though of course it is impossible to put all the blame on any one person in such matters.

I am especially grateful for how Smith delineates several times the totalitarian potential of Spinoza's political thinking. That is, as he slams religious hierarchies of all sorts (due in part no doubt to how he was ejected from the Amsterdam synagogue, and how Jews were persecuted in Spain), he goes to the opposite extreme and embraces too fondly civil government. I think Edmund Burke and Toqueville showed how society is best if there are mediating institutions between the individual and the national government. I think the French and Russian revolutions are the perfect examplars of what happens when you eliminate [guillotine or shoot] the middlemen.

Signs of Smith's bias; as I said, very few. As the first reviewer pointed out, on the very last page, Smith declares the "liberal solution" [basically, assimilation for Jews] "to be the worst solution except for all the alternatives." But are they really Jews if they completely empty out the transcendent meaning of Judaism, except for the admirable social justice political content? I don't think Abraham, Isaac, Jacob or Moses would agree, but what did they know?

On pp 1-2, Smith refers to the following. "Rise of religious fundamentalism..." Already, sets those folks up as bogeymen. "...relgious issue seemed to belong to a dark, atavistic past." "Seemed" to whom? Perhaps to an agnostic/secularist, but not to an objective scholar. "...our faith in modernity..." Who is "our?" Does everyone who hangs out with Smith qualify as "everyone?" Some of us do not have 'faith' in modernity, but do acknowledge that it is the ruling ideology in Western Europe and parts of USA. Finally, Smith summarizes the PTT as "should religion rule politics, or should politics rule religion?"

Why does it have to be either/or? Why can't it be both/and, as it was harmoniously in USA until approximately 1947?

Again, excellent book, well worth your time investment.

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