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by Nuala O'Faolain

  • ISBN: 0810998068
  • Author: Nuala O'Faolain
  • ePub ver: 1416 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1416 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (March 1, 2011)
  • Formats: rtf lrf mbr mobi
  • Category: Reference
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
epub A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism of Nuala O’Faolain download

She became well known after the publication of her memoirs Are You Somebody? and Almost There

She became well known after the publication of her memoirs Are You Somebody? and Almost There. She went on to write a biography of Irish criminal Chicago May and two novels. O'Faolain was born in Clontarf, Dublin, the second eldest of nine children.

A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism of Nuala O'Faolain. A Radiant Life - Nuala O'Faolain. Curious and funny, tender and scathing, Nuala O’Faolain’s columns in the Irish Times were never less than trenchant and always passionate. Through the prism of casual, everyday encounters, O’Faolain digs into her subjects in ways that transcend topicality.

2 quotes from A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism: ‘States have no goodness. A Radiant Life Quotes Showing 1-2 of 2. States have no goodness. They suppress these villains here and promote those villains there, with no aim but self-aggrandizement. Nuala O'Faolain, A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism.

A Radiant Life presents the unequivocal voice of Nuala O'Faolain tackling a vast range of subjects from Catholicism to feminism, from Sinatra to Africa, and from Irish American culture to Islam and the West. Curious and funny, tender and scathing, O'Faolain's columns were never less than trenchant and were always passionate.

com's Nuala O'Faolain Author Page. A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism of Nuala O'Faolain Mar 1, 2011.

Published by Abrams Image, 2011. Condition: Good Soft cover. Bibliographic Details Publisher: Abrams Image. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . Price: US$ 8. 8 Convert Currency. Publication Date: 2011.

Read A Radiant Life, by Nuala O'Faolain online on Bookmate – Writings from the New York Times–bestselling . Curious and funny, tender and scathing, Nuala O’Faolain’s columns in the Irish Times were never less than trenchant and always passionate

Read A Radiant Life, by Nuala O'Faolain online on Bookmate – Writings from the New York Times–bestselling author of Are You Somebody?, on topics from Catholicism to feminism to Irish American cu.

2011) The Selected Journalism of Nuala O'Faolain A non fiction book by Nuala O'Faolain

2011) The Selected Journalism of Nuala O'Faolain A non fiction book by Nuala O'Faolain. A Radiant Life presents the unequivocal voice of Nuala O'Faolain tackling a vast range of subjects from Catholicism to feminism, from Sinatra to Africa, and from Irish American culture to Islam and the West. I was blinded by the habit of translating everything into personal terms," she writes apologetically, but this is the power of her journalism.

Nuala O'Faolain died in May 2008 in Dublin. A Radiant Life: The Selected Journalism of Nuala O'Faolain (2011). A More Complex Truth (essays from the mid-1980s to 2008, published in 2010). She was 68. Learning that she had terminal cancer just eight weeks before her death she declined treatment and instead embarked "on a last visit to her favourite cultural landmarks" with a small group of friends, traveling to Paris, Madrid, Berlin and Sicily. Best Love, Rosie, published posthumously in 2009.

A Radiant Life presents the unequivocal voice of Nuala O'Faolain tackling a vast range of subjects from Catholicism to feminism, from Sinatra to Africa, and from Irish American culture to Islam and the West. Curious and funny, tender and scathing, O'Faolain's columns were never less than trenchant and were always passionate. "I was blinded by the habit of translating everything into personal terms," she writes apologetically, but this is the power of her journalism. Through the prism of casual, everyday encounters, O'Faolain presses her subject, reaching beyond the prompting of the moment to transcend topicality. The result is a cumulative historical narrative, an inadvertent chronicle of a transformed Ireland by one of its sharpest observers and canniest critics.Praise for A Radiant Life:

"This book is a gift."-The Boston Globe
Comments (5)

Gavirus
How I wish I'd had an opportunity to share a cuppa' with this woman. Her writing takes me in, treats me right, and leaves me satisfied. I've read and re-read most of her books, fiction and non, and have not been disappointed by any of them.
Olelifan
Stunning writing. I loved every word, every phrase, every paragraph.
Jeronashe
Reading her works are both challenging and enjoyable. Would love to know what the native Irish person felt about her readings.
Shaktizragore
The consistency with which the late Nuala O'Faolain relates her thoughts echoes in this collection, largely of her columns for the Irish Times of Dublin. She combines erudition with no-nonsense observations, and her calm, steady, but ethical and forthright presence graces this collection. I heard some of this material on an audiobook version of her "Almost There" sequel to her international breakthrough memoir, "Are You Somebody?" and her voice can be heard as clearly on the page as on the tape. That is, a composed, opinionated, but compassionate and reasoned p-o-v.

The 71 entries of this collection start in 1987. The first piece looks at the Statue of Liberty refurbishment celebrations broadcast, but from an Irish view, that of the global underdog, not the flag-waving immigrant. She contrasts the Reagan years' rhetoric with the realities where the world's comprised of Sandinistas as well as Sinatra fans, and how the two may even overlap, in a vision outside the narrow patriotism marketed as entertainment, as American, she notes, as is St Peter to the Vatican.

She's a fair-minded critic of Catholic restrictions, imposed upon body and mind. Many essays explore the impacts of belief, fear, and capitulation to the demands of the Irish state and its clerical power. She also represents the liberation of an older generation from what she regards as the confines of a mental dictatorship and a physical regimen of joylessness. If you want to understand how far and how quickly Ireland's become secularized, O'Faolain offers a tangential as well as direct testament of how it happened since the late 80s, so rapidly, but perhaps because it was based on such shallow grounds. She notes in an incisive entry, "Irish Atheism," how ingrained the habits are, for communal standards and not personal conviction, to go along, from mother to child, with the system of faith that few believe but which fewer dare to challenge, for fear of upsetting the elders.

These pieces flow along often magically, as one topic one month fits into the one a few weeks later. She avoids easy sentiment and lilting cant. She's tough minded, yet open hearted, a tricky combination. Her steady output published here reflects, then, O'Faolain's curiosity, her evolution as an observer of her Dublin-based, but also Belfast and Manhattan surroundings, and how she kept her thoughts channeled as they did not drift but moved along, say, maternal lack of faith to babies once given up by the thousands by unwed mothers, to abuse in schools by clerics and nuns.

The American title's "A Radiant Life" but the Irish original's "A More Complex Truth." The former pitches herself maybe as known to international readers, her vibrancy and down-to-earth quality. The latter edges towards a knottier Irish refusal to let one opinion, one fact, one voice dominate a conversation. Each entry's short enough not to tire the reader, but long enough to engage the audience for a few minutes. This compression suits the contemplative tendency of her columns, as they mused about a point for a thousand or so words.

She finds fresh angles on familiar topics. About violence against women, she commences with her walk as night fell at 4:30 on a remote Irish island, and how surprised she was to see stars, as she realized how long it'd been back in the city since she went out in the dark alone. She laments her dental care, the death of her dog Molly, and she slowly moves, if beyond finally and inevitably beyond the last pages here (she died a year after the last 2007 column) into aging and mortality. She faces her future with admirable balance and brave rationalism, but she does not act as if she has the last answer to the eternal mysteries which she ponders, if without the conventional pieties professed, at least publicly, by most of her readers and neighbors. This broad-minded approach, combined with a patient ear and an eye tilted towards the have-nots and the overlooked, wins one over.

O'Faolain dismisses hero worship, of local boys turned idols U2, of the neighboring island's royals, of native politicians and prelates and celebrities. She does not do this out of spite, but out of morality. She does not pander to her everyday attitudes, but she explains them simply as those emanating from a well-educated woman with the right to her own informed views, and a forum to express them with as much composure as those granted pulpits, cameras, and platforms for cynical, destructive, and sinister intentions. This anthology offers a modest, but lasting memorial to her journalism. She confessed her own inadequacies at its limits, but for me, it shows how the past quarter-century felt for a bold Irish woman despite her leanings for the corner and not the spotlight.
Hbr
Read in June, 2012

The columns in this collection of Nuala O'Faolin's writing appeared between 1986 and 2008, and as often happens with collections of newspaper work, not all of the writing here has stood the test of time. Not that the writing is ever less than excellent -- O'Faolain always writes incisively and well -- but the march of time has reduced the relevance of some of this work. In addition, several selections spin off of news of the day in Ireland which, however horrific or riveting there, never became newsworthy in America. A bit of background would have helped with that. For me, the most interesting pieces were those she wrote from Northern Ireland in 1998, when she moved for a time to the six counties as the Clinton-brokered peace reached fruition. That half dozen or so pieces include insight after stunning insight at the unutterable depth of the sectarian divide and the awesome difficulty both sides will -- and have -- had overcoming hatred. For me, the weakest of these writings are those about Manhattan: "It was a joyous place, the Paris of our time, stylish, frivolous, affordable, and wonderfully hospitable to dreams. Manhattan is not monumental and self-important, like Washington, and it doesn't manufacture, like Chicago, and it isn't intellectual, like Boston. Its industries are the light ones -- publishing, fashion, advertising. It knows it is light, and it sends its own light New Yorkness up." What a naive and uninformed view of what was then -- in September 2001 -- and almost certainly still is the undisputed financial capital of the planet. Money was, is and always will be the premier industry in Manhattan, which makes it monumental and most definitely important. O'Faolain's view of New York is sentimental, marveling at the layers of culture deposited in that city by wave after wave of immigrants. Of course, the same could be said of any of the great American cities which rose in the 19th -- Boston, Hartford, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cleveland -- the list is long. Those cities and many others -- Miami, New Orleans, Phoenix, Los Angeles, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle -- absorbed new waves of immigrants in the late 20th century, many of them from non-European parts of the globe. Who will enjoy this collection? Readers who really loved O'Faolain's memoir, Are You Somebody?, people with a special interest in contemporary Ireland, and writers interested in the work of pivotal figures in newspaper journalism.

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