» » How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Cash Flow and Other Vital Signs Out of the Numbers

epub How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Cash Flow and Other Vital Signs Out of the Numbers download

by John A. Tracy

  • ISBN: 0471507458
  • Author: John A. Tracy
  • ePub ver: 1542 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1542 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 164
  • Publisher: Wiley; 3rd edition (October 2, 1989)
  • Formats: doc azw mbr mobi
  • Category: Reference
  • Subcategory: Encyclopedias & Subject Guides
epub How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Cash Flow and Other Vital Signs Out of the Numbers download

It shows you how the three parts of a financial report-the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow . Better yet, it shows how they connect with each other and tie together

It shows you how the three parts of a financial report-the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow statement-fit together and the story they tell. And it provides up-to-date coverage of important tax reforms, depreciation methods, international standards, recent FASB rulings and more. How to Read a Financial Report is your plain-English guide to sorting out what all those numbers are really saying. Better yet, it shows how they connect with each other and tie together.

Электронная книга "The Comprehensive Guide on How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers", John A. Tracy, Tage C. Tracy. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Comprehensive Guide on How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

To ask other readers questions about How to Read a Financial Report, please .

The cash flow statement should be read carefully to see if there are any danger signs or red flags. This book lays out the intricate details of the connection between the financial statements and brings to light the importance of differentiating the Earnings from the Cash-Flow.

John A. Tracy CPA. The book does cover the basics well . When you read the book you come to actually like the author as a person, which probably why he is able to get away with some of the strange formatting of the the book. He also does have moments of nice clarity. The book does cover the basics well, but my main problem with the book is that it is not formatted very well. 1. He shows all these complicated(for beginners) pictures first, then tells you like 20 pages later, "Oh hey don't bother trying to understand them because I will be going over them in depth later in the book. That is just poor teaching.

numbers/John A. Cash flow is underscored throughout the book; this is the hallmark of the book, and what distinguishes it from other books on analyzing financial statements. It takes the joint effort of both the author and the publisher.

His other books include the 250,000 copy bestseller, "How to Read a Financial Report". Библиографические данные. How to read a financial report: wringing vital signs out of the numbers How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers, John A.

Author:Tracy, John A. Publisher:John Wiley and Sons Ltd. Book Binding:N/A. World of Books USA was founded in 2005. Starting with Cash Flows. Introducing the Balance Sheet and Income Statement. Profit Isn2t Everything. Book Condition:VERYGOOD. Cost of Goods Sold Expense and Inventory.

Financial reports provide vital information to investors, lenders, and managers. The book helps you get a sure-handed grip on the profit, cash flow, and financial condition of any business

and to guide the inquiry of the court in seeking an informed resolution of the conflict. The core of the manual.

You're not going to master the rest of your life in one day. Just relax. and to guide the inquiry of the court in seeking an informed resolution of the conflict. Fred Alan Wolf's 'The Yoga of Time Travel (How the Mind Can Defeat Time)'. 36 MB·74,117 Downloads·New!.

Hidden somewhere among all the numbers in a financial report is vitally important information . 13 Cash Flow from Profit and Loss. About the author (2004)

Hidden somewhere among all the numbers in a financial report is vitally important information about where a company has been and where it is going. This is especially relevant in light of the current corporate scandals. About the author (2004). He is also the author of The Fast Forward MBA in Finance. Bibliographic information. How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers.

This updated and revised edition of the best-selling guide shows how to interpret the numbers (and read between the lines) of a financial report. Explains how to cut through the maze of numbers and distill the tangible implications for managing and investing in business. The Third Edition covers changes in the tax laws and depreciation rates and the latest FAS pronouncements on cash flow statements and features an updated treatment of the auditor's standard report. Includes more information on spreadsheets, references, and examples, plus 100 diagrams and charts.
Comments (7)

Forcestalker
Easy to read book about understanding financial reports and how the financial reports mean different things and relate to other financial reports. I would suggest reading a chapter a day (chapters are 2-4 pages long), so you can digest everything you read. I have a much better understanding of financial statements since reading this.
WinDImmortaL
As a first year MBA in the middle of my accounting course I was still struggling. I'd aced Accounting as an undergrad, but only then realized Accounting in undergrad is more akin to book-keeping than financial analysis - BIG difference!

A friend recommended this as an additional book that might help explain things, so I ordered a copy. If only I'd read this before starting the course! It explains, in neat and concise language, many of the concepts with which I'd been having a large amount of trouble. It quickly shows how the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement work together to explain what is happening in the business.

My only complaint is that this book doesn't really discuss journal entries. Perhaps that's intentional and might be one reason why this book works, but given how effective it is at simplifying everything else, I would love to have the benefit on Tracy's insight on this as well.

While this book would never replace a full accounting textbook, it should be required reading before ever touching any major text. By focusing on one single company and set of statements, you can concentrate on the concepts without having to try to understand a different set of numbers. This makes a world of difference when trying to understand how everything works together. Once these basic concepts are understood, more advanced details make more sense and things fall into place much, much faster.

Make no mistake: accounting is a different language that takes a long time to learn. Think of this book as a phrase book you use to learn the essentials before (if you must) tackling how the language works. No, you won't be able to tear apart the books and become a genius investor, but it'll turn on the lightbulb that will let you understand other books.
felt boot
I loved this book. John Tracy does an outstanding job introducing financial statements: how to read them, how to make sense of the numbers, and the basic framework around the statements. His language is easy to understand, and his examples illustrate the new concepts very well. The book is 200 pages long, and there is zero fluff. I found everything to be very useful information - nice and crisp.

Tracy jumps in by introducing cash flows and basic financial statements. He continues through the first half of the book by going down the income statement and the balance sheet together, describing how the numbers from the two statements work together (i.e. which portions of the income statement affect various numbers on the balance sheet).

Next, Tracy jumps into cash flows and describes the cash flow statement. He nicely illustrates how cash flow and profit differ and how they can grow in opposite directions depending on whether the business is expanding or shrinking. Tracy then covers logistics - he talks about statement footnotes, the importance of CPA audits, and the organizations and standards surrounding financial statements. He continues by discussing the various methods of expensing the cost of goods (LIFO, FIFO, average) and various depreciation and amortization techniques, and wraps up with common financial ratios (ROE, ROI, P/E, etc.) and a brief FAQ of basic questions and answers.

There are many diagrams throughout the book, and they are, for the most part, very helpful. I found a couple small errors in the diagrams (and a couple typos throughout the text), but they didn't really hinder my understanding - it was obvious what the author was trying to say and show.

This book does not require any previous knowledge of the subject. In fact, Tracy does a fantastic job defining everything he discusses. I like how new terms and concepts are italicized to emphasize their importance. The book is well organized (see 2nd and 3rd paragraphs of this review), although I wish that chapters 20 and 21 (cost of goods expense methods, depreciation & amortization techniques) came earlier in the book - closer to where Tracy discussed these items on the income statement. However, I do understand his motivation to save these items for later - so as not to confuse the reader with more advanced topics while introducing the basics - and to postpone the discussion of various ways to affect the net income.

Tracy is unafraid to give his own personal advice. He often uses "I think" and "in my opinion" throughout the book to emphasize his own preferences and thoughts rather than the generally accepted ideas. He expresses his opinions on the GAAP (generally accepted accounting principles), the organizations that ultimately govern the GAAP, and, most importantly, on acceptable and average values for various financial ratios - I found this to be most helpful.

On a totally different note, the book has an interesting physical format - it is wider than it is taller. While this sucks for bookshelf storage, it gives lots of room for the large and clear diagrams.

In conclusion, I recommend this book to anyone wishing to learn about financial statements. You will not see very advanced topics, but you will get a great introduction and quite a bit of practical advice. Excellent job by John Tracy!

Pros:
+ very easy to read and understand - Tracy's explanations are simple and straight to the point
+ lots of diagrams, which nicely illustrate the flow of numbers
+ great intro to the 3 basic financial statements
+ additional useful and interesting info on the organizations and standards surrounding financial statements
+ practical advice (average values for certain ratios, what to look for first in the financial statements, etc.)

Cons:
- a couple small diagram errors and typos (not very significant)
- could include more info on advanced topics
Quashant
This is a great book which presents the proper framework from which to approach a financial report. It very clearly explains the interlocking relationship of the three major financial statements. Like the author states on page 25, he had already earned his Ph.D. before he realized how the three statements, although presented separately, are truly articulated with each other.

Apparently, accounting instruction in American universities hasn't gotten any better since he was in school.

Thank goodness for this book; It may be basic, but, unfortunately, these basics weren't something that were well articulated during my time in school either. Maybe I was sleeping too.
Runeterror
I liked the approach that John Tracy took when writing this book, instead of focusing just on the accounting terms and explain them as a stand alone items, John is able to explain accounting principles, terms and concepts by utilizing a method of the relationship between the 3 key financial statements: the income statement, the balance sheet, and the cash flows statement.

By relating the key items in each statement both the beginner and the more advanced can easily understand and think about key concepts such as the relation between Sales Revenue and Accounts Receivables and the significant of depreciation.

I also liked other topics that were covered in the book such as the explanation of various ratios (and their significance both for investors and creditors).

The book is a great gem for whoever wants to learn the language of business - accounting.

Amir Avitzur
Author of "Why do we sell low and buy high? The guide you must read BEFORE you invest"

Related to How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Cash Flow and Other Vital Signs Out of the Numbers: