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epub The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which has Defied Interpretation for Centuries download

by Rob Churchill,Gerry Kennedy

  • ISBN: 075286422X
  • Author: Rob Churchill,Gerry Kennedy
  • ePub ver: 1327 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1327 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 294
  • Publisher: Orion Publishing (July 1, 2004)
  • Formats: lrf azw rtf mbr
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
epub The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which has Defied Interpretation for Centuries download

The Voynich Manuscript, or MS408 in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale, is this fantastic . In the end, the riddle remains unsolved.

The Voynich Manuscript, or MS408 in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale, is this fantastic artifact, which if it appeared as the McGuffin in a work of y fiction the reader would dismiss it as unbelievable even by Dan Brown standards, and yet there it i.

The Voynich Manuscript book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which has Defied Interpretation for Centuries as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author:Churchill, Rob. Book Binding:Hardback. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. He has made a number of BBC Radio 4 programmes, including one on the Voynich Manuscript. Rob Churchill has written scripts for the BBC, Thames Television and numerous independent production companies in Britain and abroad. Country of Publication.

In 1912, Wilfrid Voynich, an antiquarian book dealer, stumbled upon a strange volume, its vellum . The codex has remained undeciphered from that day to this.

In 1912, Wilfrid Voynich, an antiquarian book dealer, stumbled upon a strange volume, its vellum pages covered in a beautiful but unrecognisable script accompanied by equally mystifying pictures. Voynich believed the codex to be the work of medieval philosopher Roger Bacon, others that of the Elizabethan mathematician and occultist John Dee. Whoever created the bookwhich now resides at Yale Universityit remains to this day a singular enigma which continues to defy the best efforts of linguists, cryptologists, and scholars.

In 1912, Wilfrid Voynich, an antiquarian book dealer, stumbled upon a strange volume, its vellum pages covered in a beautiful . The Voynich Manuscript : The Mysterious Code That Has Defied Interpretation for Centuries. by Rob Churchill and Gerry Kennedy.

In 1912, Wilfrid Voynich, an antiquarian book dealer, stumbled upon a strange volume, its vellum pages covered in a beautiful but unrecognisable script accompanied.

Gerry Kennedy and Rob Churchill explore the mystery surrounding the Voynich Manuscript, examining the many . Gerry Kennedy is a freelance writer and has produced a number of BBC Radio 4 programs, including one on the Voynich Manuscript in 2001

Gerry Kennedy and Rob Churchill explore the mystery surrounding the Voynich Manuscript, examining the many existing theories about the possible authors of this work and the information it may contain. They trace the speculative history of the manuscript and reveal those who may be connected to it, including Roger Bacon, John Dee, and the Cathars. Gerry Kennedy is a freelance writer and has produced a number of BBC Radio 4 programs, including one on the Voynich Manuscript in 2001. Rob Churchill is a professional writer who has written scripts for many production companies, including the BBC and Thames Television.

The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which Has Defied Interpretation for Centuries. by Gerry Kennedy, Rob Churchill. Published April 1, 2005 by Orion Books Limited. Just as with the provenance of his manuscript, a certain murkiness surrounds Wilfrid Voynich's origins.

Book Which Even Today Defies Interpretation. Manufacturer: Orion Release date: 29 July 2004 ISBN-10 : 075285996X ISBN-13: 9780752859965. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

For centuries, it has acted as a blank screen for numerous people to project their (often somewhat demented) historical . Have you read The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which has Defied Interpretation for Centuries by gerry Kennedy?

For centuries, it has acted as a blank screen for numerous people to project their (often somewhat demented) historical, cryptological, novelistic fantasies onto, or if not that then an academic cliff to throw their hard-earned reputation over: yet recently there are signs that a few people are (at long last) starting to look at the VMs with (relatively) clear eyes. Have you read The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddle of an Extraordinary Book Which has Defied Interpretation for Centuries by gerry Kennedy? If so, it’s any good? Thanks again.

The Voynich Manuscript: The Unsolved Riddles of an Extraordinary Book Which Has Defied Interpretation fior Centuries (London: Orion Books, 2004), summarizes and reflects upon the most prominent theories, even comparing it to Hildegard’s Lingua, along with her illuminations. 16. Aryeh Kaplan, Sefier Yetzirah: The Book ofi Creation in Theory and Practice (York Beach, ME: Red Wheel/Weiser, 1997), p. 2. oogle Scholar.

In 1912, Wilfrid Voynich, an antiquarian book dealer, stumbled upon a strange volume, its vellum pages covered in a beautiful but unrecognisable script accompanied by equally mystifying pictures. The codex has remained undeciphered from that day to this. Voynich believed the codex to be the work of medieval philosopher Roger Bacon, others that of the Elizabethan mathematician and occultist John Dee. Whoever created the book—which now resides at Yale University—it remains to this day a singular enigma which continues to defy the best efforts of linguists, cryptologists, and scholars. With the benefit of the authors' exhaustive research, readers can hazard their own guesses as to the meaning and provenance of this most beguiling of mysteries.
Comments (7)

Xurad
This book was a page-turning introduction to the enigmatic Voynich Manuscript and I recommend it to anyone who wants a sober, thorough beginner's introduction. Like other anomalous phenomena, the Manuscript attracts all manner of lofty and unlikely conjecture, and I feared this edition might be another exercise in New Age speculation. Luckily, there is little mention of aliens, magic, Masonic conspiracy or Bible codes: the scholarly, skeptical authors survey the manifold legitimate disciplines that the Manuscript has been viewed through. The reader will be introduced to such varied studies as cryptography, outsider art, alchemy, medieval literature, the trade of rare books, botany, internet communities, and much more. But don't expect a pat answer as to the Manuscript's origins- the enigma only deepens as more light is shed on it.
Freaky Hook
written by aliens - need to get them to send the decoder
Lo◘Ve
This book is a very interesting read for persons of a certain education. Not easily understood by many readers.
Ventelone
"This is a book about a book. More bizarrely, this is a book about a book no one can read or understand" (from the Introduction). The Voynich Manuscript, or MS408 in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale, is this fantastic artifact, which if it appeared as the McGuffin in a work of historical-conspiracy fiction the reader would dismiss it as unbelievable even by Dan Brown standards, and yet there it is. About 250 pages long, written in an alphabet that "looks kind of like Tolkien's tengwar, and kind of like Arabic, and kind of like 13th century monastic Latin miniscule" (Ken Hite) in no known language, and with illustrations of plants (none of which can be positively identified), alchemical and astrological charts and symbols (ditto), naked ladies in bathtubs, and other stuff even less describable. Do a Google Images search on "voynich manuscript"--worth many thousands of words. A letter found with the manuscript and other circumstantial evidence indicate it must be older than 1608--unless the letter (and/or the entire manuscript) is a forgery, of course. The historical figures who star in the "mainstream" history of the book are an interesting enough collection: Roger Bacon, John Dee and Edward Kelley, Rudolf II, Athanasius Kircher; the more peripheral and/or speculative characters who get mentioned just make it a high-weirdness wampeter, like William Friedman, H.P. Lovecraft, Elizabeth Bathory, the Jesuits, and the Cathars. Wilfrid Voynich, the turn-of-the-last-century rare book collector who discovered the manuscript and for whom it's named, turns out to be quite a character himself.

The book is clearly written, though with some stylistic oddities (like, Kennedy sometimes writes in the first person and sometimes is spoken of in the third; Churchill never makes a first-person appearance until the very end), but does an especially good job of presenting the cryptological problems posed by the MS. The authors indicate along the way which theories are busted and which are at least plausible, and in the final chapter present a raft of theories by the current crowd of Voynicheros and, finally, each their own theory. No, I won't tell you here just what they are; I will say that the sad thing is, the most plausible-sounding theories are the ones that mean no translation will ever be possible. Which means, I suppose, that the most plausible are the ones that inherently cannot be proved, which is some kind of neat paradox.
Vojar
The Voynich manuscript remains one of the most puzzling artifacts handed down to us from antiquity. It is in an unknown language, using an unknown script, and not so much as a word has been successfully translated (though many have tried). It is filled with whimsical illustrations of plants that cannot be identified, stars that do not exist, and astrological diagrams unlike anything seen elsewhere. It is also filled with drawings of naked women cavorting in vessels of green liquid for purposes which cannot be fathomed. The author is unknown, the date is unknown (although figured to be between 1250-1450), and how the manuscript came to be preserved for the past 650 years is also a mystery.

It has been suggested by some researchers, and the authors of this book tentatively agree, that the whole thing might be an elaborate Medieval fake. Yet the sheer magnitude of it -- 272 pages, 211 illustrations, 170,000 characters, all carefully arranged and consistently produced -- would seem to argue against that. Add to that the statistical analysis of the text, which indicates that it probably *is* a legitimate language, and you have a real puzzle on your hands.

Since so little has been gleaned from the manuscript itself, the authors take the reader on a tour through Medieval scholarship, alchemy, astrology, astronomy, religious history and cryptology (since many have speculated it could be in some kind of code). The lives of several of the proposed authors are studied, along with many people who may have had a hand in preserving it. Thus the book is about a lot more than the manuscript itself, and indulges in many fascinating digressions along the way.

In the end, the riddle remains unsolved. The Voynich is probably a minor alchemical text of no particular import, perhaps the last surviving text in this language after the Crusades destroyed nearly 80% of the world's non-Christian libraries. For a fascinating glimpse into the superstitious Medieval world and the learning lost through subsequent winnowing by rampaging zealots, this book offers an excellent read.

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