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epub Voices of the Game: The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting -- from 1921 to the Present download

by Curt Smith

  • ISBN: 0671738488
  • Author: Curt Smith
  • ePub ver: 1450 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1450 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 623
  • Publisher: Fireside; Updated edition (1992)
  • Formats: rtf docx azw mbr
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
epub Voices of the Game: The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting -- from 1921 to the Present download

Voices of the Game book. Really liked the last chapter about how CBS totally screwed up baseball in 1990 with no Game of the Week.

Voices of the Game book. Remember as a kid hating that, and missing the show, "This Week in Baseball. Other parts of the book on Dizzy Dean, Harry Caray, Jack Buck and Milo Hamilton are also interesting. A good read, but don't be like me. Read in a park with a radio nearby playing a baseball game.

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Home SMITH, Curt: Voices of the Game. SMITH, Curt: Published by New York, et. Simon & Schuster, 1992. The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio. The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting - from 1921 to the Present. From Ted Kottler, Bookseller (Redondo Beach, CA, . Price: US$ 7. 0 Convert Currency.

Curt Smith's history of baseball broadcasting on both radio and television from 1921 to 1991 is a must-have for any baseball library and a fun overview of an oft-neglected topic

Curt Smith's history of baseball broadcasting on both radio and television from 1921 to 1991 is a must-have for any baseball library and a fun overview of an oft-neglected topic. Many wonderful insights are revealed for the first time about local and network broadcasters, their comings and goings and their impact on the game itself.

Voices of the Game : The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting from 1921 to the Present.

Curt Smith's seventeenth and newest book is June 1, 2018's The Presidents and the Pastime . His baseball books include Voices of The Game, what Publisher's Weekly called the "monumental" history of baseball broadcasting.

Curt Smith's seventeenth and newest book is June 1, 2018's The Presidents and the Pastime: The History of Baseball and the White House-the ideal author to be the first to exhaustively explore the tie between the two great American institutions of the Presidency and baseball. To USA Today, Smith is the "voice of authority on baseball broadcasting"-and to Chicago Cubs announcer Pat Hughes, "simply one of the best baseball historians, ever.

Curt Smith, author, Voices of The Game: The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting From 1921 to the Present "In its day, boxing fascinated American sports fans, even more so than football does today

Curt Smith, author, Voices of The Game: The Acclaimed Chronicle of Baseball Radio and Television Broadcasting From 1921 to the Present "In its day, boxing fascinated American sports fans, even more so than football does today. The text details the rich role that prizefights played in radio and television's formative years, profiles the colorful announcers behind the microphones and repaints word pictures that captured historic fights!"

The Jewel Voice Broadcast (玉音放送, Gyokuon-hōsō) was the radio broadcast in which Japanese Emperor Hirohito (Emperor Shōwa 昭和天皇 Shōwa-tennō) read out the Imperial Rescript on the Termination of the Greater East Asia War (大東亜戦争終結ノ詔書, Daitōa-sensō-shūket.

The Jewel Voice Broadcast (玉音放送, Gyokuon-hōsō) was the radio broadcast in which Japanese Emperor Hirohito (Emperor Shōwa 昭和天皇 Shōwa-tennō) read out the Imperial Rescript on the Termination of the Greater East Asia War (大東亜戦争終結ノ詔書, Daitōa-sensō-shūketsu-no-shōsho), announcing to the Japanese people that the Japanese Government had accepted the Potsdam Declaration demanding the unconditional surrender of the Japanese military at the end of World War II. This speech was broadcast at noon Japan Standard.

For fans of baseball broadcasting, this is an indispensable book

For fans of baseball broadcasting, this is an indispensable book. From Red Barber to Curt Gowdy, Vin Scully to Mel Allen, Joe Garagiola to Dizzy Dean, this is a loving tribute to the men who broadcast baseball over radio and TV. The various blackout restrictions in the 50's and 60's are explored, and the impact of Dizzy Dean as a broadcaster was a revelation to me. I was too young to remember his heyday, but he was the man who captured the heartland with his folksy rambles.

Traces the history of baseball broadcasting on radio and television, and offers profiles of the top broadcasters
Comments (7)

August
Would be better if Curt Smith wasn't so intent on injecting himself into the narrative, apparently in an attempt to prove to you that he actually spoke to these people. It's great to get the recollections of legendary announcers (many of whom are gone by now), but they could have been quoted instead of Smith insisting on including his questions, asides and winks. And Smith is also bound and determined that you will get that he has a huge, pretentious vocabulary full of Words No One Uses. The info is good. Its presentation is hard.
Sironynyr
This book makes a great gift for anyone who's a fan of old-timey baseball or the art of the spoken word. And who isn't?
Zicelik
Simply put, this is THE definitive history of baseball announcing, with biographies of the individual broadcasters themselves interspersed with more big-picture observations concerning baseball and broadcasting in general. The book was clearly a labor of love for its author, a fact which should make his occasional forays into self-indulgence forgivable. Smith has a decided bias toward the late '50s and early '60s, the era of his own childhood; as the reviewer from Ohio noted, he makes too many critical comparisons between the different "Voices" (although THIS reviewer misses Harry Caray tremendously and considers Jon Miller one of the all-time greats); and he peppers the text with comments derived from his conservative political leanings. Nonetheless, the anecdotes are fascinating and the sheer scope of the work is most impressive. All that's needed now is a third edition to touch on the entry of Fox into the network landscape and other developments of the last decade.
Ielonere
Curt Smith's history of baseball broadcasting on both radio and television from 1921 to 1991 is a must-have for any baseball library and a fun overview of an oft-neglected topic. Many wonderful insights are revealed for the first time about local and network broadcasters, their comings and goings and their impact on the game itself. About the only drawback of this book and which keeps it from five stars is Smith's annoying habit of digressing into his personal opinions about various broadcasters, past and present. While this isn't too intrusive for announcers he praises, I for one was offended by his rude treatment of an announcer I grew up with as a Yankees fan in the late 1970s and who was my "Voice Of Summer" as surely as Mel Allen was to an earlier generation, in my case Frank Messer of the wonderful Yankees broadcast team of Phil Rizzuto, Messer and Bill White. Ditto his obnoxious diss at Gary Thorne of the New York Mets and ESPN who only happens to be one of the top all-around play-by-play men in the business today. Such comments are better suited to a media critic in the newspapers and not to a historical overview and in my opinion keep the book from being a flawless gem.
Dammy
This is not light reading, not at all. But it's worth it if baseball is in your blood, and if its announcers are perhaps even more vital to the game's greatness than the players are. As another reviewer said, the author says needlessly unkind things about certain broadcasters, particularly mentioning their drinking habbits. So what? Unless a guy drinks himself out of a job, (which has happened,) announcers have as much right to booze as players or any other working man. Other than that, the book is filled with great portraits of announcers who are forgotten, though they shouldn't be. Lastly, I find it ludicrous that this book is not availablein audio format. It's about announcers-if ever a book needed to be done in audio format, this is the one.
terostr
Curt Smith is one of the most eloquent writers around today. This chronicle of the great voices who have brought the game of baseball into our homes is an absolute treasure. From Graham McNamee to Ty Tyson up to Mel Allen and Jack Buck, all of the great baseball voices are brought back to life. Curt Smith does a masterful job bringing to life these men who had the rare talent of entertaining us with descriptions of a baseball game.
Celen
Simply put, Mr. Smith's writing gets in the way of the subject about which he writes. This is a great 400-page book. Unfortunately, it's 623 pages long. Mr. Smith never takes one word if he can say it in ten. Were he one of the broadcasters about whom he writes, he would be described as "being in love with the sound of his own voice."

And it's such a shame, because this is a worthwhile topic. I climbed into the book hoping for a great deal, but what I got was a great deal less than that. Wordiness killed this book.

Smith might say that "One man's wordiness is another man's poetry," but I would say the man for whom wordiness is "poetry" is not yet fit to write.

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