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by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain,Roushan Jahan,Roshan Jahan,Hanna Papanek

  • ISBN: 0935312838
  • Author: Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain,Roushan Jahan,Roshan Jahan,Hanna Papanek
  • ePub ver: 1730 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1730 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 90
  • Publisher: The Feminist Press (August 1988)
  • Formats: mbr txt lit rtf
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
epub Sultana's Dream and Selections from The Secluded Ones (A Feminist Press Sourcebook) download

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain. Reproduced by permission of Roushan Jahan. Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain. Afterword by Hanna Papanek

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain. Afterword by Hanna Papanek.

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880 - 1932) was a Bengali Muslim writer and feminist activist who founded . Roushan Jahan and Hanna Papanek. The Secluded Ones ar Sultana's Dream, is a feminist utopia written in 1905

Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880 - 1932) was a Bengali Muslim writer and feminist activist who founded the first Muslim girls’ school in Calcutta in 1911. The Secluded Ones ar Sultana's Dream, is a feminist utopia written in 1905. The tale address the archaic and cruel practise of seclusion of women and the 'purdah system' prevalent in India. The tale set in Ladyland is a witty tale of reverse seclusion where men confined to the 'zenana' (women's quarters) and women have taken over the public sphere.

In 1905, Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain (1880–1932), a Bengali Muslim woman in colonial India, published ‘Sultana’s . Hossain ‘Sultana’s Dream’ and Selections from The Secluded Ones. New York: The Feminist Press at CUNY, pp. 7–18.

1 Hossain’s short story chronicled the experiences of purdah-observing Sultana in Ladyland, a utopian society created by (and for) women. Selections from The Secluded Ones.

The second section of this book is a section complied by Roushan Jahan in which Hossain's writing about purdah (from a book called "The Secluded Ones") is reproduced in the form of various 'reports' all of which demonstrate something fundamentally absurb or violent about being in purdah.

Sultana's Dream is a 1905 feminist utopian story written by Rokeya Sakhawat Hussain, a Muslim feminist, writer and social reformer from Bengal. It was published in the same year in Madras based English periodical The Indian Ladies Magazine. Bengali women authors, Women authors.

oceedings{A, title {Sultana's Dream: And Selections from The . A Temporal Freedom of Women in Sultana's Dream and The Yellow Wall Paper: Through the Lens of a Critical Reading.

oceedings{A, title {Sultana's Dream: And Selections from The Secluded Ones}, author {Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain and Roushan Jahan and Hanna Papanek}, year {1993} }. Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain, Roushan Jahan, Hanna Papanek.

Sultana’s Dream Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain ONE EVENING I was lounging in an easy chair in my bedroom and thinking lazily of the condition of Indian womanhood. I am not sure whether I dozed off or not. But, as far as I remem- bet, I was wide awake.

Rokeẏā, Begama, 1880-1932; Jahan, Roushan; Papanek, Hanna . Publications of Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain": p. 89. Includes bibliographies.

Rokeẏā, Begama, 1880-1932; Jahan, Roushan; Papanek, Hanna; Rokeẏā, Begama, 1880-1932. New York : Feminist Press : Distributed by the Talman Co. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Written by. Manufacturer: The Feminist Press at CUNY Release date: 1 August 1988 ISBN-10 : 0935312838 ISBN-13: 9780935312836. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Sultana's Dream is a witty, skillful, and appealing tale that posits a world in which women have taken over the public sphere and men are confined to the private hidden world of. . 3. The Secluded Ones: Purdah Observed.

Sultana's Dream is a witty, skillful, and appealing tale that posits a world in which women have taken over the public sphere and men are confined to the private hidden world of seclusion. 4. 5. Rokeya: An Introduction to Her Life.

Sultana’s Dream, first published in 1905 in a Madras English newspaper, is a witty feminist utopia—a tale of reverse purdah that posits a world in which men are confined indoors and women have taken over the public sphere, ending a war nonviolently and restoring health and beauty to the world."The Secluded Ones" is a selection of short sketches, first published in Bengali newspapers, illuminating the cruel and comic realities of life in purdah.
Comments (7)

Preve
Really, I just came here for the dream story. It's set in a conservative part of India (or somewhere near), where strict segregation of men and women remains the norm. Depending on how strict, this could approach imprisonment for the women. It's for the women's own good, of course, because mean can be so dangerous and unpredictable.

The women, in their gender-exclusive research universities, have been developing solar energy, electric vehicles, weather control, and other such fripperies - useless to the men, interested only in more powerful weapons. Then a war breaks out, and the men lose badly. Beaten and in retreat, they retreat to the city and await conquest. At this point, the women offer to give it a shot, reasoning that nothing they do could make things worse. In order to maintain the segregation, this means the men must take to seclusion while the women try to defend the city.

They do this brilliantly, or course. Their mastery of solar energy adapts readily to use as a heat ray. It scorches the enemy where they stand, without ever putting the women's frailty in harm's way. The men's seclusion endures after the war is won - after all, doesn't it make more sense to put the dangerous animals behind bars and let the decent citizens walk freely? It's a very short story, but an interesting Utopia of women in charge.

I also found the brief descriptions of purdah interesting if somewhat horrifying, and only worse knowing that such conditions still exist. The biography and commentary interest me less, so I leave them to other commentators. So, although the content is thin, I found it well worth reading, and notably prescient in some of the women's technology.

-- wiredweird
Bedy
Purdah, or the seclusion of a group of people from the rest of the world, is a practice still alive and well in several parts of the world. While it may not be very common in India at the beginning of the twenty-first century, it was quite common during the first half of the twentieth. This book presents short story "Sultana's Dream" and the recollections of women living under purdah complied by Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain. There is also an introduction to each work and an analysis of Hossain's life and writing by Roushan Jahan interspersed between each piece. In other words, there are four individual essays and one short story in this collection. It could be difficult for women today who do not live in purdah to understand but it is important to remember our collective past and realise similar things are happening today.
Malaris
Love this book! Feminist sci-fi written by a Bengali woman in 1905?! Yes, Please!
LadyShlak
If you are at all interested in Feminism then you must read this book. Discusses Purdah and the utopia dream of Hossain.
Voodoosida
This is a fascinating collection of work written by three near east feminists. The length is part of its strength.

Highly recommended.
Bu
This is an interesting book that gives an insight to the Indian tradition of purda. The only disappointment was that the back cover had a deep crease but, I would still recommend this company.
Winotterin
This is not a book, this is a pamphlet about a book. I am disappointed, great writing just too little for too much money!
This little book was more than just an extraordinary short story written by a woman in 1905 who examined and questioned purdah by turning the issue into a humorous "dream" sequence (in a place where the men are in purdah!) - it is also a compilation of other materials in the examination of what purdah is and means. Relatively unknown and not understood in the West, "purdah" ("parda" in Hindi, meaning 'curtain') is the seclusion and segregation of women (even from other women, not of the family) and is a tradition that is thrust upon women of many Middle Eastern and Asian societies. In the West we confusedly belief it is only Muslim when in fact other religions undertake it as well.
Rokeya Hossain wrote Sultana's Dream at the urging of her husband who was quite forward-thinking (for an Asian male in the early part of the last century!) and who believed that by writing, she would be able to perfect her English skills. The Dream is brilliantly simple and clearly written. The idea that a woman in purdah should suddenly find herself in a place where it is the men in the society who are hidden away and where life is peaceful and intellectual thought and political balance are the norm (as a result of not having the men out messing things up), is a delight even to a contemporary Western reader.
The second section of this book is a section complied by Roushan Jahan in which Hossain's writing about purdah (from a book called "The Secluded Ones") is reproduced in the form of various 'reports' all of which demonstrate something fundamentally absurb or violent about being in purdah. The third section is a piece by a Western woman named Hanna Papanek who examines how much more complicated purdah is than just a means by which men in a given society control and suppress women. That definition is certainly valid, but Papanek also examines a case where a woman raised in purdah finds "exposure" (after a life of purdah) to be fraught with fear and discomfort.
In all, a fascinating and in a strange sense appalling cultural phenomena that is basically unknown to the West, purdah is handed here to the reader in a way that makes it possible to examine it without generating the viseral anger that the idea raises in most educated women. I am strongly inclined to study the issue further and to find "The Secluded Ones" - once I feel strong enough not to let it infuriate me!

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