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by Meri Nana-Ama Danquah

  • ISBN: 1583228896
  • Author: Meri Nana-Ama Danquah
  • ePub ver: 1510 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1510 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 304
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press (October 6, 2009)
  • Formats: lrf rtf docx azw
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
epub The Black Body download

Personal Name: Danquah, Meri Nana-Ama. African Americans Race identity Human body Social aspects Body image Anthropometry.

Personal Name: Danquah, Meri Nana-Ama. Rubrics: African Americans Race identity Human body Social aspects Body image Anthropometry. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH's previous work includes the groundbreaking memoirWillow Weep for Me; A Black Woman's Journey Through Depressionand two critically acclaimed anthologies,Becoming.

MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH's previous work includes the groundbreaking memoirWillow Weep for Me; A Black Woman's Journey Through Depressionand two critically acclaimed anthologies,Becoming AmericanandShaking the Tree. She earned an MFA in creative writing and literature from Bennington College. A native of Ghana and a single mother, Danquah lives in Los Angeles, California.

Danquah's literary libation to the Black body consists of a collaboration of folks-Black, White, and both-all of whom .

Danquah's literary libation to the Black body consists of a collaboration of folks-Black, White, and both-all of whom seek to convey what it's like to live in one, be a part of one, and be affected by one. Before opening "The Black Body," I already had preconceived notions of how I thought it would read, considering the fact that I have a Black body, myself. MERI NANA-AMA DANQUAH's previous work includes the groundbreaking memoir Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman's Journey Through Depression and two critically acclaimed anthologies, Becoming American and Shaking the Tree.

Author of The black body, Willow weep for me, Becoming American, Becoming American, Shaking the tree. Showing all works by author. Would you like to see only ebooks? The black body.

Meri Nana-Ama Danquah, a Ghanaian-American author, published Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman’s Journey Through Depression in 1998. 2019 г. 0 ответов 0 ретвитов 0 отметок Нравится.

She is best known for her 1998 memoir Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman’s Journey Through Depression. Nana-Ama Danquah was born in Accra, Ghana, to Josephine Nana Korantemaa Danquah and Norbert Duke Brobby.

by Meri Nana-Ama Danquah. 30 black, white and biracial contributors celebrate the black body's dramatic role in culture.

A startlingly honest, elegantly rendered depiction of depression, Willow Weep for Me calls out to all women who suffer in silence with a life-affirming message of recovery. Meri Danquah rises from the pages, a true survivor, departing a world of darkness and reclaiming her life.

What does it mean to have, or to love, a black body? Taking on the challenge of interpreting the black body's dramatic role in American culture are thirty black, white, and biracial contributors—award-winning actors, artists, writers, and comedians—including voices as varied as President Obama’s inaugural poet Elizabeth Alexander, actor and bestselling author Hill Harper, political strategist Kimball Stroud, television producer Joel Lipman, former Saturday Night Live writer Anne Beatts, and singer-songwriter Jason Luckett.Ranging from deeply serious to playful, sometimes hilarious, musings, these essays explore myriad issues with wisdom and a deep sense of history. Meri Nana-Ama Danquah’s unprecedented collection illuminates the diversity of identities and individual experiences that define the black body in our culture.
Comments (2)

Umi
I would definitively recommend it. It's a great reading and a good inspiration that sparks reflecting further on the real, incremental and underused value of diversity in this "global village" that Earth has turned on for good."How can we have meaningful discussions about race when our descriptions of race defy common sense?" in words of Werner Disse, one of the many contributors to this book. I particularly fancied Susan Matus' relation of a "very-white" looking woman living in Harlem and I was very touched for her heart felt account of her personal discovery journey through the relationship she established with one particular individual in her neighborhood, that allowed her to overcome her initial fear and transmute it into some new inner light to see the world through. Same as with Matus and Disse's personal relations, all the different larger than life contributions to Danquah's collection are absolutely worthy and make it very easy to put ourselves in the shoes of the different individuals and share their memoirs, and I find myself enriched after the reading. Again, I highly recommend THE BLACK BODY.
Mr_Mix
I went to a recent panel discussion, hosted by the editor, and several of the essayist. I thought I was listening to a post antebellum diatribe on race in America. The entire panel either was suffering from severe post traumatic stress from their past or present racial encounters. The premise of the book is an old archaic post civil rights discussion on race. Led by a Ghanaian who has bought in to the orientalist view of race.

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