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by Barbara Sinclair

  • ISBN: 1568022778
  • Author: Barbara Sinclair
  • ePub ver: 1409 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1409 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 257
  • Publisher: Cq Pr; 1St Edition edition (February 1, 1997)
  • Formats: doc docx rtf azw
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
epub Unorthodox Lawmaking: New Legislative Processes in the U.S. Congress download

Unorthodox Lawmaking puts the transformation of the lawmaking process in Congress into context, documenting specific changes that have occurred and providing an argument for precisely why they took place.

Unorthodox Lawmaking puts the transformation of the lawmaking process in Congress into context, documenting specific changes that have occurred and providing an argument for precisely why they took place. Sinclair illustrates the use of these new techniques in a way that keeps students interested. Author: Vincent Moscardelli. Unorthodox Lawmaking is a great read, with a strong foundation about Congress as an institution. Sinclair strikes a balance between general statements and nuance, and demonstrates how complicated the policy process has become.

Unorthodox Lawmaking book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Unorthodox Lawmaking: New Legislative Processes in the US Congress as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

New Legislative Processes in the . Barbara Sinclair does an excellent job of showing how contemporary lawmaking departs from the traditional legislative process

New Legislative Processes in the . Barbara Sinclair - University of California, Los Angeles, USA. Courses: Congress. July 2016 320 pages CQ Press. Barbara Sinclair does an excellent job of showing how contemporary lawmaking departs from the traditional legislative process. I can't imagine teaching a course on Congress without this text-it’s absolutely indispensable. Most major measures wind their way through the contemporary Congress in what Barbara Sinclair has dubbed unorthodox lawmaking.

The author introduces students to the intricacies of Congress and provides the tools to assess the relative successes and limitations of the institution. This dramatically updated revision incorporates a wealth of new cases and examples to illustrate the changes occurring in congressional process.

Shahram Arshadnejad Precis 9 Nov. 2016 Unorthodox Lawmaking New Legislative Processes in the .

New major bills are sent to many committees, especially in the House, while some measures bypass committee altogether. Not infrequently, after a bill has been reported, before it reaches the Floor, major substantive changes are worked out via informal processes. Shahram Arshadnejad Precis 9 Nov. Congress Barbara Sinclair Sinclair argues that the legislative process has changed, significantly, although the major legislations still have a great chance of consideration in Congress.

Sinclair aptly calls this 'unorthodox lawmaking', and gives students a much more realistic take on today's legislative process.

Congress There is the textbook a-law' diagram, and then there is the way that most major measures really wind their way through the contemporary Congress. Sinclair aptly calls this 'unorthodox lawmaking', and gives students a much more realistic take on today's legislative process.

Most major measures wind their way through the contemporary Congress in what Barbara Sinclair has dubbed unorthodox lawmaking. COUPON: Rent Unorthodox Lawmaking New Legislative Processes in the .

Unorthodox Lawmaking : New Legislative Processes in the U. S. Congress. This book is a great source of information on the legislative process in Congress today. It is a bit technical and has a lot of examples (that you can skim over), but it is very informative

Unorthodox Lawmaking : New Legislative Processes in the U. It is a bit technical and has a lot of examples (that you can skim over), but it is very informative. If you want to know more about the legislative process or are going to work on the Hill, this is definitely a useful book. The Ugly Reality of Lawmaking. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 17 years ago.

Clean Air: An Introduction to How the Legislative Process Has Changed Multiple Paths: The Legislative Process in the House of Representatives Routes and Obstacles: The Legislative Process in the Senate Getting One Bill: Reconciling House-Senate Differences Omnibus Legislation, the Budget Process, and Summits Why and How the Legislative Process Changed A Tale of Two Stimuli: The Bush/Pelosi/Boehner Stimulus Bill of.

Comments (4)

Kerdana
I got this for my American Legislative Process class. This version is older than the one my professor required. Ooops. It's THE authority on lawmaking, but rather boring. Even my professor tended to find news articles for our class to try to make it more engaging.
Samugul
There exists a profound difference between the legislative process observed on Capitol Hill and the legislative process described in most U.S. Gov't textbooks and Sinclair's work presents a fluid and well written testament to that fact!
In her preface, she explains that this work was written to help the most nascent student of Congress understand the legislative process, but I would say those without a working knowledge of Congress will not appreciate the nuances in this work.
Sinclair compares historical and even for their time, controversial legislation (Clean Air Act) with the more modern examples of legislation that proved out signficantly more problematic than their earlier counterparts. Moving back and forth between the House and the Senate, she begins to paint the picture of the divisiveness that is partisan politics today.
That Sinclair would write such an ambitious work, is a tribute to her understanding of this body. This book is sophisticated and insightful and should be on the shelves of EVERY student in political science, but particularly those who study Congress.
I would add this disclaimer however, that this book is not for the faint of heart. If one has already developed an abiding mistrust in Congress, this book may only serve to reinforce it. The simple fact is, if more people were exposed to the true nature of "doing the business of the people," they would appreciate the "ugliness of democracy" and embrace it for that! Three cheers to Barbara!
Black_Hawk_Down
In her book, Unorthodox Lawmaking: New Legislative Processes in the U.S. Congress, Barbara Sinclair successfully argues that legislation no longer follows the common "textbook method." Representatives and senators alike have adapted new methods, sending each bill through a different custom-tailored process. Though she leaves a few questions unanswered, Sinclair uses multiple forms of research to paint a clear picture of how legislation is now passed.
Sinclair divides the book into three sections - first analyzing the path bills take, then exploring how and why these processes developed, and finally making an in-depth analysis of these changes through several case studies.
The House, she argues, has grown more efficient through this developmental process. The leadership has seized power through a variety of rules and other manipulations. By shipping bills to what committee it wants (or, in some cases, committees), the leadership can put bills in friendly hands. Post-committee changes make bills passable, and finally the leadership can use rules to craft debate exactly how it wants.
In the Senate, the opposite has happened. Senators have used new methods to gain individual power. Most importantly, Senators have often use filibusters, both covertly and overtly, to prevent the majority from getting its way. The need for a 60 person majority gives a minority senator incredible power.
After this analysis, Sinclair then turns to examine how these changes came about. She suggests that opportunity and necessity drove the changes. As parties became more polarized and constituents demanded more efficient legislation, the Senators looked for ways to outsmart and out manipulate the other side. Ultimately, Sinclair argues that these processes have made passing legislation more efficient. Significant legislation has passed more often when such measures have been applied.
Proving any thesis, including this one is a difficult task. Some books, including the Jacobs/Shapiro book and the Fenno book, lack a strong backbone because they rely on only one method of research that each have obvious shortcomings. Sinclair avoids this mistake, opting for a variety of research methods that paint a broad and tightly constructed picture.
The first method Sinclair turns to is statistical data. Multiple charts confirm Sinclair's argument that the legislative process is becoming more complex. Figure 5.1 notes a distinct and obvious trend towards the use of more special maneuvers. Later figures confirm these trends (at least to a degree) in the Senate.
As evidenced in Jacobs and Shapiro, statistical evidence does, however, have its limit. Sinclair successfully researches history and changing political dynamics to explain the statistics, not leaving them to stand on their own ground. Of course, this method has its drawbacks. The reader is forced to accept Sinclair's interpretation and conclusions. Nonetheless, there is no better method to interpret the data, and Sinclair seems to have done her homework, presenting a thoughtful and well researched chapter.
Finally, Sinclair uses another method to bring her point together. Standing alone, case studies do not pass muster; they are simply too narrow to make broad generalizations. When taken in the context of statistical data and interpretations, however, they effectively bring the numbers to life. Sinclair starts by examining the National Service Bill. She highlights a more or less traditional process. The reader does, however, see several uses of non-traditional methods, particularly in the Senate, where a filibuster threat and a non-germane amendment give the minority quite a voice. By the time the Omnibus Health Bill was passed, Sinclair describes a process that was completely different. The bill is sculpted and directed at every turn. The reader sees a clear difference from the first case study to the last.
Using these methods, Sinclair does paint a convincing picture. However, she leaves some notable holes. The first concerns the role of the President in the legislative process. In her initial analysis (chapters 1 through 5), she considers the president only briefly, mentioning his veto power and the occasional need for a summit. Surely, the president's role is not limited to a brief meeting. From reading the case studies, it becomes obvious the president is often influential, even a driving force in legislation. Why is the president's role essentially ignored in her descriptive analysis?
Sinclair's ultimate conclusion is that "unorthodox lawmaking" makes legislating more efficient, but she seems to recklessly add that legislation will now "reflect the will of the people." Through examination of this book, I have encountered scant evidence that would suggest this to be true. The new tools are used to overcome the power of the opposing party; how this reflects public opinion is not seriously addressed.
In fact, Sinclair offers little proof that new legislative processes have significantly increased responsiveness to the general public. By making this statement, Sinclair opens a whole new set of inquiry about the dynamics of public opinion and the influence of outside interests. Unfortunately, she can not substantiate any claims in this area. An interesting addendum to this book might include an analysis of how closely legislation's relation to public preference has changed as these processes developed. Another addendum might include an inquiry into how the public sees these processes. Does it further the view that the Congress is simply power driven and unresponsive?
Despite these minor shortcomings, Sinclair nonetheless proves her point. Congress today is a different body than it used to be several decades ago. Legislation no longer follows the textbook method on its way to becoming law. Instead, it takes many different paths and contours, contours that help promote its passage. Unorthodox Lawmaking is a piece of sound research that describes an evolving process.
Nalmezar
I had to read this book for a course on the Legislative Process. While it is definitely readable, and well-researched, it is expectedly dry. Sinclair describes methods that are becoming more common in getting major legislation passed, and shows that this unorthodoxy is not necessarily a bad thing. The first half of the book describes the changes that the system has undergone, while the second half illustrates how these methods affected several major bills. Examples include a national service bill, regulatory overhaul, an omnibus drug bill, and two budgets.

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