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by A. B. Chitty,Joe Sacco,Priscilla Murolo

  • ISBN: 1565844440
  • Author: A. B. Chitty,Joe Sacco,Priscilla Murolo
  • ePub ver: 1737 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1737 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 364
  • Publisher: New Pr (October 1, 2001)
  • Formats: mobi lit docx doc
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
epub From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: A Short, Illustrated History of Labor in the United States download

A comprehensive history of American labor. Enlivened and diverted by the humorous cartoon narratives of Joe Sacco. Like Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," this work shows the great depth and breadth of the workers struggle in the story of America

A comprehensive history of American labor. An enjoyable introduction to American working-class history. Like Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," this work shows the great depth and breadth of the workers struggle in the story of America. From the days of the American War of Independence, workers united against every form of slavery, dominance, and exploitation,. Their struggles won the 40-hour week, the 8-hour day, the end of child labor, workplace safety laws, and the minimum wage.

Outstanding history of labor in this country, up to about 2000. This is really more of an American history book with some Labor history thrown in. Overall, it's a good idea but the execution is lacking. The range of this history is broad, including bonded servants, Native Americans, slaves, and undocumented workers along with native-born laborers.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 333-344) and index. From the folks Who Brought You the Weekend is an history of labor in the United States, capturing the full range of working people's struggles, from indentured servants and slaves in the seventeenth-century Chesapeake to high-tech workers in contemporary Silicon Valley.

Priscilla Murolo teaches American history at Sarah Lawrence College. Weekend: An Illustrated History of Labor in the United States (The New Press). He lives in Portland, Oregon. The co-author, with . Chitty, of From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: An Illustrated History of Labor in the United States (The New Press), she lives in Yonkers, New York. Comics journalist Joe Sacco is the author of Palestine, Safe Area Gorazde, and The Great War and the illustrator for From the Folks Who Brought You the. Chitty works as a librarian systems officer at Queens College.

Murolo online on Bookmate – Newly updated: An enjoyable introduction to American working-class history.

Read From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend, by . Chitty, Priscilla Murolo online on Bookmate – Newly updated: An enjoyable introduction to American working-class history.

Chitty have added a wealth of fresh analysis of labor's role in American life, with new material on sex workers, disability issues, labor's relation to the global justice movement and the immigrants' rights movement, the 2005 split in the AFL-CIO and the movement civil wars that followed, and. the crucial emergence of worker centers and their relationships to unions. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee. Published by New Press, The. Need help ASAP?

Автор: Murolo Priscilla, Chitty A. B. Название: From the Folks Who .

First published in 1964, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was Ian Fleming's only children's book, written for his son Caspar.

of labor in the United States, Priscilla Murolo and A. Chitty; illustrated by Joe Sacco. A Flik grant from Sarah Lawrence College gave Priscilla some money for travel. p. cm. Includes index. Feedback from students in labor history courses at Sarah Lawrence, the Midwest Summer School for Women Workers, and summer workshops sponsored by Hospital and Health Care Workers District 1199 in Ohio, West Virginia, and Kentucky sharpened the analysis and the narrative. Friends and comrades like Kim Scipes, David Cline, and Gideon Rosenbluth helped us at particular points.

to be a struggle for working people in the United States. The tone for the laboring class was set early on in our nation's history.

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend : A Short, Illustrated History of Labor in the United States. Clearly the theme for this book is that life has been and continues to be a struggle for working people in the United States.

Joe Sacco and Christopher Hitchens. The Fixer: A Story from Sarajevo. Naji al-Ali and Joe Sacco. Ken Kesey, Chuck Palahniuk (introduction), Robert Faggen, and Joe Sacco (cover artist). A Child in Palestine: The Cartoons of Naji al-Ali.

Ranging from indentured servitude in seventeenth-century colonial America to high-tech workers in modern-day Silicon Valley, this comprehensive history of labor in the United States explores the efforts of working people to win the rights we take for granted--basic health and safety standards, fair on-the-job treatment, minimum wage, and weekend leisure.
Comments (7)

Frosha
Like Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States," this work shows the great depth and breadth of the workers struggle in the story of America.

From the days of the American War of Independence, workers united against every form of slavery, dominance , and exploitation,.

Their struggles won the 40-hour week, the 8-hour day, the end of child labor, workplace safety laws, and the minimum wage. These great accomplishments created the middle class in America and the highest standard of living in history.

The capitalistic class fiercely fought union organization at every step, using police, goon squads, and state and federal troops to harass, gas, attack, beat, arrest, shoot, and, massacre strikers and organizers.

The workers' strike is the prototype of all non-violent resistance. The workers' movement spawned and supported many initiatives of social justice, including the vote for women and blacks, equality in the workplace, the rights of immigrants, gays, Native Americans, and the poor, and protection of the environment.

The capitalist class remains more powerful than ever. The workers and their movement show us what must be done and what struggles remain ahead to change the system.
Gavirim
Quick read, not perfect but better than a lot of things you could be reading designed to alienate you from your fellow workers and sabotage your life by promoting pro 1% ideologies
Macill
Clearly the theme for this book is that life has been and continues to be a struggle for working people in the United States. The upper class, whether the pre-Revolutionary landed aristocracy or the more recent industrial or post-industrial capitalistic class, through its power, privilege, and wealth, has largely dominated and controlled the working class irrespective of wage or slave labor. The democratic promise of the nation's founding has taken a beating in this arrangement.
The authors attempt the impossible: the description of working class life in general over the last five hundred years with snapshots of countless names and events to provide the sustenance. The tone for the laboring class was set early on in our nation's history. The brutal and deadly nature of both indentured and permanent servitude is vividly brought home by the authors' careful description of their conditions and often futile resistance. Yet the fissures within the working class itself are evident throughout the book. Immigration and slavery and resulting ethnic conflicts and racism are shown through any number of positions taken and violent incidents to have been devastating to working class solidarity. In addition to ethnicity and race, the authors do not shrink from gender and sexual orientation issues. And the trampling of Native Americans fortifies the authors' arguments for the abuse of power.
To counter power and to assert their own voice, workers have formed countless organizations such as political parties (Socialist, Greenback), advocacy and reform groups (Ten Hour Leagues, producer and consumer cooperatives), community groups (Black Panthers, fraternal orders), as well as labor unions. The authors provide enough detail for the reader to see a U.S. labor movement at odds with itself in terms of basic philosophies. It has adopted any number of approaches: the political of the Knights of Labor, the syndicalist of the IWW, the bargaining of the AFL, the CIO's social unionism, and the post-WWII social-accord, not to mention narrow, craft-based unions versus industrial. Of course the issues of native-born versus ethnic or racial differences have been played out in the labor movement.
The authors accurately point out that there have been few periods where the democratic promise for the American working class has made sustained headway. Interestingly enough they comment little on WWI as being a period where workers called for making the world safe for democracy. The U.S. government was forced to back the right of workers to elect representation committees within workplaces. The two periods in our history where workers and their unions gained the most power, that is WWI and WWII, were followed by periods of either suppression or containment. And in both cases red-baiting was a primary instrument of their foes with some conservative unions leading the charge against their more radical brethren. Clearly these were huge turning points not overly emphasized by the authors.
While the book is consistent in showing that working class life has been a constant struggle, there is a lack of an attempt to understand the basis of continued setbacks. The issue of American "exceptionalism," the failure to achieve a stronger, permanent political position, is relevant in any history of the American working class. The Western European working class managed to tame the worst excesses of capitalism. The role of the mass media and the educational system might well be factors to consider. In addition, the attempt to be inclusive of most relevant players and events in the working class story results in what seems like a mountain of details, which can cloud the bigger story. One might question how much insight can be achieved into the American working class from this book alone. It seems that some previous background would have to be assumed.
I'm a Russian Occupant
Great read for anyone that needs a reminder of why corporations need to be kept in check.
Pedora
This book is written in plain language that is easy to read and understand. It has made learning in class better.
Bukus
this book was very interesting, similar, but differnet from other books on labor history....gave its own unique perspective of the labor movement. informative.
Ericaz
The unions have been constantly harassed since their inception. No, unions did not kill Detroit, Robots killed Detroit. Unions are great when they are honest, and they usually are. The Kindle version of Joe Sacco's drawings are illegible, you will need to print them out. Anyone who wants to know about labor history in America should read this. It would be nice if Rand Paul and Newt Gingrich would read it. It would also serve them well in suppository form.
Great

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