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epub Outsourcing America: What's Behind Our National Crisis and How We Can Reclaim American Jobs download

by Ron Hira

  • ISBN: 0814408680
  • Author: Ron Hira
  • ePub ver: 1340 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1340 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: AMACOM (May 13, 2005)
  • Formats: lit mbr lrf doc
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
epub Outsourcing America: What's Behind Our National Crisis and How We Can Reclaim American Jobs download

This book, "Outsourcing America," gives us what we are looking for to learn more about the subject. The OPEC oil crisis showed us how vulnerable we were in the area of power.

This book, "Outsourcing America," gives us what we are looking for to learn more about the subject. I found it very readable. It flows wells, is full of details, and does not pull its punches. We were becoming a debtor nation, and we were losing control of our most valuable resources: large American companies, which had seemed to have our nation's interest at heart.

Home Browse Books Book details, Outsourcing America: What's behind Our National. Outsourcing America: What's behind Our National Crisis and How We Can Reclaim American Jobs. By Ron Hira, Anil Hira. Outsourced jobs have extended well beyond the manufacturing sector to include white-collar professionals, particularly in information technology, financial services, and customer service. Outsourcing America reveals just how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact has been and will continue to be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs.

Outsourcing America book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Outsourcing America: What's Behind Our National Crisis and How We Can Reclaim American Jobs as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Publisher description: Outsourcing America reveals how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs

Publisher description: Outsourcing America reveals how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs. The book shows how outsourcing is part of the historical economic shifts toward globalism and free trade, and demonstrates the impact of outsourcing on individual lives and communities. The authors discuss policies that countries like India and China use to attract .

Outsourcing America reveals just how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs

Outsourcing America reveals just how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs. More than an exposŽ, the book shows how outsourcing is part of the historical economic shifts toward globalism and free trade, and demonstrates the impact of outsourcing on individual lives and communities.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Outsourcing America: What's Behind Our National Crisis .

More than an exposŽ, the book shows how outsourcing is part of the historical economic shifts toward globalism and free trade, and demonstrates the impact of outsourcing on individual lives and communities. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Outsourcing America : The True Cost of Shipping Jobs Overseas an. .

Outsourcing America : The True Cost of Shipping Jobs Overseas and What Can Be Done about It. by Anil Hira and Ron Hira.

Bibliographic Details. Title: Outsourcing America: What's Behind Our. PE (Rochester, NY) is a recognized expert on outsourcing, and the only person to testify twice before Congress on its implications

Bibliographic Details. Publication Date: 2005. PE (Rochester, NY) is a recognized expert on outsourcing, and the only person to testify twice before Congress on its implications. He has appeared on national television and radio, and has been widely quoted in The New York Times, Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Times of London and other publications. Burnaby, BC) is a specialist in international economic policy and trade issues. He currently teaches at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.

The Offshore Outsourcing Of American Jobs: Congressional Act Of Unemployment Terrorism! by Volubrjotr, 10 Nov 2013. November 9, 2013 Source: Dr. Paul Craig Roberts Is offshore outsourcing good or harmful for America? To convince Americans of outsourcing’s benefits, corporate outsourcers sponsor misleading one-sided studies. Only a small handful of people have looked objectively at the issue. These few and the large number of Americans whose careers have been destroyed by outsourcing have a.

Foreword by Lou Dobbs

One of the hottest, most controversial topics in the news is the outsourcing of American jobs to other countries. Outsourced jobs are extending well beyond the manufacturing sector to include white-collar professionals, particularly in information technology, financial services, and customer service. Outsourcing America reveals just how much outsourcing is taking place, what its impact is and will be, and what can be done about the loss of jobs.

More than an exposŽ, the book shows how outsourcing is part of the historical economic shifts toward globalism and free trade, and demonstrates the impact of outsourcing on individual lives and communities. The authors discuss policies that countries like India and China use to attract U.S. industries, and they offer frank recommendations that business and political leaders must consider in order to confront this snowballing crisis -- and bring more high-paying jobs back to the U.S.

Comments (7)

Gavirim
The shifting of jobs from the U.S. to other countries and its workers has been going on for decades. We hear news reports of examples of this now and then, but we do not get a good overview of its magnitude. This book, "Outsourcing America," gives us what we are looking for to learn more about the subject. I found it very readable. It flows wells, is full of details, and does not pull its punches. And although the book is pushed by Lou Dobbs in the Forward, I would not let his involvement worry you, if, like me, you tend not to be a Lou Dobbs fan.

In the Preface, the authors remind us that after World War II, Americans did not see much of anything other than prosperity on the horizon. The war was over, the Great Depression was a thing of the past. America was truly on top of the heap, with most of the money in the world, and most of the consumers and the manufacturing. But by the early 1970's, Americans were shocked to find that they were not in charge of their own destiny, as they had wanted to believe. The OPEC oil crisis showed us how vulnerable we were in the area of power. President Ronald Reagan talked a good story, but the truth was that he was growing the size of our federal government and the size of our debt. We were becoming a debtor nation, and we were losing control of our most valuable resources: large American companies, which had seemed to have our nation's interest at heart.

The authors tell us the truth: "U.S. companies are enthusiastically embracing offshoring" for a variety of reasons, including the lower wages found in other countries, plus the huge tax breaks to be gained. They also tell us of the terrible track record the corporations have had in the areas of compensation and/or retraining of workers who lose their jobs because of outsourcing. And they tell us that U.S. immigration and tax laws have actually promoted outsourcing and all its problems for U.S. workers.

The first awareness of major outsourcing came in the form of Japanese imports in the 1970s. Detroit was devastated by the impact, and the reaction of the U.S. business community was twofold: First, it promoted the idea that those American workers who lost jobs to overseas competition quickly would find domestic jobs that were as good or better; and, second, that the largest American companies would participate in what we now call "globalization" for their own benefit and, indirectly, for the benefit of the U.S. and its workers.

The reality is that millions of U.S. jobs have been lost to foreign competition since the 70s and that the majority of those workers have NOT found jobs that were as good or better than the jobs they lost. The reality is that most of our major U.S. companies HAVE done well in their involvement in globalization. Very well, indeed. But this, for the most part, has come at the expense of the American workforce.

Per the authors, outsourcing creates winners and losers, and American workers, for the most part, have been the losers. Companies tell us that they find better workers and opportunities overseas. What they really mean is that the costs of labor are cheaper, and the benefits paid are less. And all the talk about "penetration" into foreign markets is mostly used as a smokescreen. But what are the facts involved here? What do the studies of all this show?

The authors tell us that there have been three major studies done. They poo-poo them all as self-serving and purposely inaccurate. They also point out that the federal government has done little to slow the growth of outsourcing. No statistics are kept by the government, and companies are reluctant to share this information. Per the authors, the federal government has felt little pressure to slow the outsourcing process. Former Secretary of Labor, Elaine Chao, once said, "The stock market is, after all, the final arbiter." And several former CEOs have been upfront with their plans. Jack Welch, former head of GE, once said that GE would outsource 70 percent of its future work. And Carly Fiorina, former head of Hewlett-Packard, was deeply involved in the promotion of outsourcing of domestic work to India. Per the authors, IBM laid off its first domestic worker in 1992.

But it gets worse. American companies use subsidiary companies to hide their involvements with outsourcing and/or their development of new facilities overseas. Even federal and state governments have been found to be using companies that were outsourcing work, instead of hiring domestic workers. And American companies are buying foreign companies to get footholds in other countries. In many cases, their workers overseas travel back and forth from their native country to the U.S., as the demand for their services shifts. Major U.S. companies such as Microsoft have demanded H-1B visas for tens of thousands of overseas workers, claiming that they could not find domestic workers to fill the positions. No proof of these claims has been demanded by the government.

Also of concern is the development of huge foreign companies with business models designed around the exploitation of outsourcing of American jobs. The Indian company, Infosys, is a prime example. Per the authors of this 2008 book, this company, which is listed on the U.S. stock exchange, had a market capitalization of more than $30 billion. The bulk of its work is "designed to service North American and Western Europe markets, not its local markets." And much of this work is not in lower-level jobs, such as telemarketing. Infosys has become a major international IT company that has the resources and track record to be competitive with IBM in bidding opportunities around the world.

In many ways, this globalization of employment is a race to the bottom, as companies are always on the lookout for lower-cost labor and better taxation deals. The authors claim that our current immigration policies have been written, for the most part, by industry lobbyists. H-1B visas allow as many as 120,000 new foreign workers into the U.S. each year, and no one really knows the true number of these workers in the country at any one time. Estimates are as high as 500,000. The federal government does not track the salaries/wages of these workers. The assumption is that they are being paid 40-50% lower than what American workers would be paid with similar work skills. And, of course, these same workers can take work "home" with them, if they or their employer so choose. They would still be employed by the American company. In a well-documented case, Siemens transferred work done in the U.S. from domestic to foreign workers, who earned about one-third of what the domestic workers had been paid.

The book includes much more, including discussions about outsourcing from and into many other countries of the world. In the end, the authors say that "there are no silver bullets, and we don't advocate shutting down offshore outsourcing." They add, "The correct way to think about it is that outsourcing does not have to be a zero-sum game if we install the right policies." Ten recommendations are made and discussed:

1) Acknowledge the problem.
2) Gather the data and study it
3) Reform U.S. Visa policies
4) Review government procurement
5) Develop assistance programs for displaced workers
6) Establish better worker protection
7) Train U.S. workers for lifelong skills
8) Look for ways to better represent the rights of workers
9) Try to maintain U.S. leadership in technology
10) Review U.S. trade policies

The conclusion is that the U.S., and its economy, has its work cut out for it, if the momentum of outsourcing is to be reversed. The companies cannot be trusted, nor can the studies. And the federal government, to date, has not done much to help. One could wish that the book was more optimistic in its outlook, but maybe this shot of realism is what we need to understand the magnitude of the problem of outsourcing. I recommend the book highly.
sergant
This book contained great information and I am sure the government and the corporations mentioned in the book didn't want you to know. I used this book as a basis for a graduate paper I wrote on Offshore outsourcing. Thorough reference section and lots of facts and statistics. You will be surprised that various government organizations use tax payer monies to pay foreign workers.

If you are wondering why America is in the position we are in now - read this book. It is not Terrorism that is responsible for the economy, it is corporate greed. Gordon Gecko's (Wall Street, 1987) mantra was "Greed is Good" and the ethics of corporate America haven't changed.
Aria
Overall it was a decent book. What I found it was lacking was any substantial evidence to support its claims. It seems to be mainly opinions and theories on outsourcing and not much facts or statistics. Granted the book is almost a decade old now, so I wasn't expecting much up-to-date information. It also seemed to repeat itself a few times and could have gotten some of its points across without being as lengthy as it is. I did get some good information out of it though.
Malien
This book is much better and in-depth inside than its cover would suggest.It is very readable without sacrificing detailed coverage of the economic and social processes and effects of the outsourcing/offshoring of US jobs. The examples, explanations, and thorough referencing make this book valuable for research and reference as well as a frightening look at what all Americans should really know and understand. This should be required reading for all. The author has an in-depth knowledge of the subject with many references from foreign sources and not just the US perspective. The author has an incredible background which substantiates his authority on this subject and can be found on google-it's worth a look. Be prepared to get very angry and depressed when you read this book, but it should be done. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
Marirne
This book tells a lot a pig how corporations are ruining this Country and the facts are what makes this book great.
Gaudiker
Ron Hira is definitely a hardcore liberal. Some of his facts are actually quite inaccurate.
Eyalanev
ok

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