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epub The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s–1920s (Reconfiguring American Political History) download

by Liette Gidlow

  • ISBN: 0801886376
  • Author: Liette Gidlow
  • ePub ver: 1197 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1197 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 280
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (March 15, 2007)
  • Formats: lrf mobi mbr doc
  • Category: Politics
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
epub The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s–1920s (Reconfiguring American Political History) download

Low voter turnout is a serious problem in American politics today, but.

Low voter turnout is a serious problem in American politics today, but. Start by marking The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s–1920s as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In The Big Vote, historian Liette Gidlow shows that the Get-Out-the-Vote .

In The Big Vote, historian Liette Gidlow shows that the Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns―overlooked by historians until now―were in fact part of an important transformation of political culture in the early twentieth century. Weakened political parties, ascendant consumer culture, labor unrest, Jim Crow, widespread anti-immigration sentiment, and the new woman suffrage all raised serious questions about the meanings of good citizenship.

Liette Gidlow shows that the Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns of the 1920s - overlooked by historians until now - helped to connect politics to a modern culture of consumption, define the place of newly enfranchised women in civic life, and remake the very meanings of citizenship

Liette Gidlow shows that the Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns of the 1920s - overlooked by historians until now - helped to connect politics to a modern culture of consumption, define the place of newly enfranchised women in civic life, and remake the very meanings of citizenship. The Big Vote: Gender, Citizenship, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s-1920s. Reconfiguring American Political History. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Reconfiguring American Political History. Culture, and the Politics. of Exclusion, 18 9 0 s - 1920s.

gender, consumer culture, and the politics of exclusion, 1890s-1920s. by Liette Patricia Gidlow. Published 2004 by Johns Hopkins University Press in Baltimore. The methods of Wrigley and Barnum : the get-out-the-vote campaigns and the commodification of political culture. Conclusion : the new regime. Includes bibliographical references and index.

The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s1920s October 2005 · The American Historical.

Thesis (Ph. -Cornell University, 1997. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 537-579). It calls on citizens to challenge dominant politics, power, and consumer culture in the name of tackling one of the world's great socio-environmental issues. Fashioning Socialism: Clothing, Politics and Consumer Culture in East Germany. November 2008 · Historical Materialism.

The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s–1920s (Reconfiguring American .

The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s–1920s (Reconfiguring American Political History). Kate Clarke Lemay -The Historian. Sheds new light on the early women's rights movement in the United States. Essential reading for anyone interested in nineteenth-century reform and in women's history. Journal of American History.

The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s-1920s by Liette Gidlow. The Vanishing Voter:Public Involvement in an Age of Uncertainty by Thomas E. Patterson.

Election 2008 made American history, but it was also the product of. .Liette Gidlow is an associate professor of history at Wayne State University and the author of The Big Vote: Gender, Consumer Culture, and the Politics of Exclusion, 1890s-1920s.

Election 2008 made American history, but it was also the product of American history. Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Sarah Palin smashed through some of the most enduring barriers to high political office, but their exceptional candidacies did not come out of nowhere.

Low voter turnout is a serious problem in American politics today, but it is not a new one. Its roots lay in the 1920s when, for the first time in nearly a century, a majority of eligible Americans did not bother to cast ballots in a presidential election. Stunned by this civic failure so soon after a world war to "make the world safe for democracy," reforming women and business men launched massive campaigns to "Get Out the Vote." By 1928, they had enlisted the enthusiastic support of more than a thousand groups in Forty-six states.

In The Big Vote, historian Liette Gidlow shows that the Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns―overlooked by historians until now―were in fact part of an important transformation of political culture in the early twentieth century. Weakened political parties, ascendant consumer culture, labor unrest, Jim Crow, widespread anti-immigration sentiment, and the new woman suffrage all raised serious questions about the meanings of good citizenship. Gidlow recasts our understandings of the significance of the woman suffrage amendment and shows that it was important not only because it enfranchised women but because it also ushered in a new era of near-universal suffrage. Faced with the apparent equality of citizens before the ballot box, middle-class and elite whites in the Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns and elsewhere advanced a searing critique of the ways that workers, ethnics, and sometimes women behaved as citizens. Through techniques ranging from civic education to modern advertising, they worked in the realm of culture to undo the equality that constitutional amendments had seemed to achieve. Through their efforts, by the late 1920s, "civic" had become practically synonymous with "middle class" and "white."

Richly documented with primary sources from political parties and civic groups, popular and ethnic periodicals, and electoral returns, The Big Vote looks closely at the national Get-Out-the-Vote campaigns and at the internal dynamics of campaigns in the case-study cities of New York, New York, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Birmingham, Alabama. In the end, the Get-Out-the Vote campaigns shed light not only on the problem of voter turnout in the 1920s, but on some of the problems that hamper the practice of full democracy even today.


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