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by Frank Van Overwalle

  • ISBN: 184169665X
  • Author: Frank Van Overwalle
  • ePub ver: 1113 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1113 kb
  • Rating: 4.9 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 536
  • Publisher: Psychology Press; 1 edition (September 12, 2007)
  • Formats: lrf azw mbr rtf
  • Category: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
epub Social Connectionism: A Reader and Handbook for Simulations download

by Frank Van Overwalle (Author). ISBN-13: 978-1841696652.

Social Connectionism offers an overview of the most recent theoretical developments of connectionist models in social psychology

Social Connectionism offers an overview of the most recent theoretical developments of connectionist models in social psychology. The volume is divided into four sections, beginning with an introduction and overview of social connectionism. This is followed by chapters on causal attribution, person and group impression formation, and attitudes. Each chapter is followed by simulation exercises that can be carried out using the FIT simulation program; these guided exercises allow the reader to reproduce published results.

When playing violent video games, aggressive actions are performed against the background of an originally neutral environment, and associations are formed between cues related to violence and contextual features. This experiment examined the hypothesis that neutral contextual features of a virtual environment become associated with aggressive meaning and acquire the function of primes for aggressive cognitions.

Social Connectionism: A Reader and Handbook for Simulations By Frank Van Overwalle1) (2007) Psychology .

Social Connectionism: A Reader and Handbook for Simulations By Frank Van Overwalle1) (2007) Psychology Press. Read & Montoya, An Autoassociative Model of Causal Reasoning and Causal Learning: Reply to Van Overwalle's (1998) Critique of Read and Marcus-Newhall (1993). Van Overwalle, When One Explanation is Enough: A Connectionist View on the Fundamental Attribution Bias. Van Overwalle, Part III: Person and Group Impression Formation.

Social connectionism: A reader and handbook for simulations. Van Overwalle, F. (2010). Infants’ teleological and belief inference: A recurrent connectionist approach to their minimal representational and computational requirements. NeuroImage, in press. (2009). New York: Psychology Press. Journal Articles: Ma, . Vandekerckhove, . Van Overwalle, . Seurinck, . & Fias, W. Spontaneous and intentional trait inferences recruit a common mentalizing network to a different degree: Spontaneous inferences activate only its core areas. Social cognition and the brain: A meta-analysis. Human Brain Mapping, 30, 829-858.

Social Connectionism : A Reader and Handbook for Simulations. by Frank Van Overwalle. Many of our thoughts and decisions occur without us being conscious of them taking place; connectionism attempts to reveal the internal hidden dynamics that drive the thoughts and actions of both individuals and groups. Connectionist modeling is a radically innovative approach to theorising in psychology, and more recently in the field of social psychology.

Van Rooy, . Vanhoomissen, . Labiouse, C & French, R. (2007). Person and group impression formation (Chapter 8). In F. Van Overwalle (E., Social Connectionism: A Reader and Handbook for Simulations. & Van Rooy, D.

Overwalle, Frank van Routledge: London, 2007 ISBN 184169665X (pb)

Overwalle, Frank van Routledge: London, 2007 ISBN 184169665X (pb). This book presents a collection of papers exploring connectionist simulation models in social psychology, for the most part written by the author and collaborators. The majority of contributions appeared in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology between 1998 and 2005. Although the original papers have been revised for the purposes of the book, such a collection has to contend with the disadvantage that a certain degree of repetition cannot be avoided.

Distributed connectionist models of mental representation (also termed PDP or parallel distributed processing, or ANN or artificial neural networks) constitute a fundamental alternative to the associative or schematic models that have been much more prevalent in social psychology. A connectionist model is made up of a large number of very simple processing units, richly interconnected and able to send signals to each other depending on their momentary activation levels. No individual processing unit represents a meaningful concept; instead, overall patterns of activation hold representational.

Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium. Social cognition and the brain: a metaanalysis. Human brain mapping 30 (3), 829-858, 2009. Understanding others' actions and goals by mirror and mentalizing systems: a meta-analysis. F Van Overwalle, K Baetens. Neuroimage 48 (3), 564-584, 2009.

Many of our thoughts and decisions occur without us being conscious of them taking place; connectionism attempts to reveal the internal hidden dynamics that drive the thoughts and actions of both individuals and groups. Connectionist modeling is a radically innovative approach to theorising in psychology, and more recently in the field of social psychology. The connectionist perspective interprets human cognition as a dynamic and adaptive system that learns from its own direct experiences or through indirect communication from others.

Social Connectionism offers an overview of the most recent theoretical developments of connectionist models in social psychology. The volume is divided into four sections, beginning with an introduction and overview of social connectionism. This is followed by chapters on causal attribution, person and group impression formation, and attitudes. Each chapter is followed by simulation exercises that can be carried out using the FIT simulation program; these guided exercises allow the reader to reproduce published results.

Social Connectionism will be invaluable to graduate students and researchers primarily in the field of social psychology, but also in cognitive psychology and connectionist modeling.


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