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epub Egypt's Making: Origins of Ancient Egypt, 5000-2000 B.C. download

by Michael Rice

  • ISBN: 0415050928
  • Author: Michael Rice
  • ePub ver: 1177 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1177 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 416
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1st edition (March 1, 1990)
  • Formats: txt rtf mbr azw
  • Category: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
epub Egypt's Making: Origins of Ancient Egypt, 5000-2000 B.C. download

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Michael Rice is an extensively published author on the history and archaeology of ancient Egypt and the near . Rice appears to be unaware of the fact that Egyptian chronology, as we now find it, has no scientific basis.

Michael Rice is an extensively published author on the history and archaeology of ancient Egypt and the near East. He is particularly interested in the origins of complex societies, and has established museums throughout the Arabian peninsula states. The First Dynasty of Egypt was originally placed in the fourth millunnium BC (by Eusebius) because he, along with Jewish chroniclers, wished to tie in the history of the Bible with that of Egypt.

Examines Egyptian history from . 000 BC to c. 2000 BC down to the collapse of the old kingdom, showing in particular how the art of the period throws light on the psychology of the people and explores the essentially African nature of Egyptian society, institutions, and art. Download (pdf, . 5 Mb) Donate Read. Categories: History.

Egypt's Making examines the 1st 3000 years of Egyptian history, from. Evoking the wonder of ancient Egypt, Michael Rice explains the essentially African character of the historic Egyptian society, institutions & art. He augments his text with many illustrations of the art & architecture of this relatively Egypt's Making examines the 1st 3000 years of Egyptian history, from . 000-2000 BCE, down to the collapse of the old Kingdom.

Michael Rice's bold and original work evokes the fascination and wonder of the most ancient period of Egypt's history. Egypt's Making is a scholarly yet readable and imaginative approach to this compelling ancient civilization. Covering a huge range of topics, including formative influences in the political and social organization and art of Egypt, the origins of kingship, the age of pyramids, the nature of Egypt's contact with the lands around the Arabian Gulf, and the earliest identifiable developments of the historic Egyptian personality.

Encounters with Ancient Egypt ; Ancient Egypt in Africa by David O'Connor; Andrew Reid; Ancient Perspectives on Egypt by Roger Matthews; Cornelia Roemer; Consuming Ancient Egypt by Sally MacDonald; Michael Rice; Imhotep Today: Egyptianizing Architecture by Jean-Marcel.

Encounters with Ancient Egypt ; Ancient Egypt in Africa by David O'Connor; Andrew Reid; Ancient Perspectives on Egypt by Roger Matthews; Cornelia Roemer; Consuming Ancient Egypt by Sally MacDonald; Michael Rice; Imhotep Today: Egyptianizing Architecture by Jean-Marcel Humbert; Clifford Price; Mysterious Lands by David O'Connor; Stephen Quirk; "Never Had the Like Occurred": Egypt's View of Its Past by John Tait; Views of Ancient Egypt Since Napoleon Bonaparte: Imperialism, Colonialism and Modern Appropriations by David Jeffreys; The Wisdom of Egypt: Changing Visions Th. .

Egypt's Making is a scholarly yet readable and imaginative approach to this compelling ancient civilization. Rice achieves his declared intention of creating the work as "a celebration of most ancient Egypt, the origins which appear to me to be without precedent or equal. great strength of Rice's approach is that he is determined to treat Egypt as part of a wider spread. has much to recommend it, not least in its infectious enthusiasm for its theme. Times Literary Supplement. thoughtful and original contribution to a neglected field.

Egypt's Making examines the first 3000 years of Egyptian history, from . 000 BC - . 000 BC, down to the collapse of the old Kingdom.

Rice is not a professional Egyptologist nor a prehistoric archaeologist involved in studying Predynastic and early Dynastic .

Rice is not a professional Egyptologist nor a prehistoric archaeologist involved in studying Predynastic and early Dynastic Egypt. He is archaeologically concerned with the Arabian Peninsula. Manufacturer: Routledge Release date: 4 July 1991 ISBN-10 : 0415064546 ISBN-13: 9780415064545.

Looks behind the artefacts of the all too often stuffy museum representations of Egypt, to an Egypt littered with toys, jewels and cosmetics, a country busy with the everyday transactions of ordinary life, and the people involved in them. This book should be of interest to wide general readership, as well as academics in the fields of archaeology, Egyptology and ancient history.
Comments (3)

Minnai
Not the latest edition.
Honeirsil
I purchased this book not for my own use but as a gift to my son's high school on completion of his schooling. His teacher was extremely pleased with it - he had done a thesis on the author whilst at university and could not speak highly enough of the book.
riki
This is an enjoyable and informative read, with Michael Rice displaying great erudition and flair for explanation. The chapters dealing with the origns of dynastic civilization in the Nile Valley are particularly intriguing, and the proofs listed of early Mesopotamian influence on Proto- and Early Dynastic Egypt have arguably put the question of Mesopotamia's influence of archaic Egypt beyond dispute.
But the book does have flaws, not least of which is Rice's unquestioning acceptance of conventional dates and dating-systems. Rice appears to be unaware of the fact that Egyptian chronology, as we now find it, has no scientific basis. The First Dynasty of Egypt was originally placed in the fourth millunnium BC (by Eusebius) because he, along with Jewish chroniclers, wished to tie in the history of the Bible with that of Egypt. In doing so, they made Menes, the first pharaoh, identical to Adam, the first man, and therefore placed him in the fifth or fourth millnnium (estimates varied) BC. And that is the position (subject to minor amendment) that he still occupies. The irony, of course, is that this mistaken attempt to sycnronize Egyptian and Israelite histories has obscured the very real contacts that existed between the two peoples, and made proper synchronization all but impossible.
Take for example the Mesopotamian influence on early Egypt. This sounds remarkably like the culture-bearing migration from Mesopotamia to Egypt and Canaan recorded in the biblical story of Abraham. The two were never connected, of course, because the Abraham story is placed by conventional historians a thousand years after the founding of Egypt's First Dynasty. Yet it can be shown that everything, absolutely everything, about the Patriarch epoch, the epoch of Abraham, Joseph and Moses, indicates that it belongs in the Early Bronze Age. The Patriarch narratives are full of references to cultural and religious practices which point clearly in this direction. Among the most notable of these are: (a) Human sacrifice (mentioned in the Abraham story and the birth legend of Moses); (b) Religious use of ziggurats and pyramids (Jacob's "stairway to heaven", at the top of which was the "house of God".); (c) Mention of cosmic catastrophes (In Abraham, Joseph and Moses narratives); (d) References to Cosmic Pillar or Tower, and its destruction (In Abraham narrative).
It is in fact with Abraham that Hebrew history first connects with Egypt - and the connection was established, it appears, right at the beginning of the histories of the two peoples. We might note, for example, the striking phallic associations of both Abraham and Menes, the first pharaoh. The name Abraham actually means "father of many", and the Patriarch initiates the custom of circumcision, whilst the Egyptian Menes (or Mena or Min) clearly takes his name from the phallic god Min, who was also associated with circumcision and was perhaps the most important deity in Egypt at the beginning of the First Dynasty. Similarly, Jewish legend recalls that Abraham entered Egypt during the reign of the first pharaoh, and emphasizes that, when he arrived, the Egyptians were virtual barbarians, and to the Patriarch went the credit of teaching them the rudiments of civilization. (See Ginzberg, Legends of the Jews).
All this dramatically calls to mind the evidence of archaeology, which has revealed a culture-bearing migration from Mesopotamia to Egypt just before the beginning of the First Dynasty, which Michael Rice has so ably illustrated.
If "Abraham" then, or the Abraham epoch, was contemporary with Menes, the first pharaoh, this has dramatic consequences for the whole of Egyptian and Hebrew history. Most immediately, it implies that the Patriarch Joseph, who brought the Hebrew tribes into Egypt, be identified with the Egyptian seer Imhotep, who laboured for pharaoh Djoser at the start of the Third Dynasty. Imhotep was the greatest and most celebrated of all Egyptian seers, who solved the crisis of a seven-year famine by interpreting Djoser's dream. In precisely the same way, biblical history tells us that, about two centuries after Abraham, a young Hebrew seer named Joseph became vizier to the pharaoh after solving the crisis of a seven-year famine by interpreting the king's dream.
Removing a thousand years from Egyptian chronology therefore seems to have the effect of producing a precise match between the histories of the two neighbouring peoples. And the matches continue through subsequent centuries. These however are missed by Rice and by all mainstream Egyptologists, who remain wedded to a chronology based ultimately on a fundamentalist interpretation of the Book of Genesis (though they are unaware of this).

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