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epub Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression download

by Errol Lincoln Uys

  • ISBN: 0415945755
  • Author: Errol Lincoln Uys
  • ePub ver: 1644 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1644 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 302
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (February 7, 2003)
  • Formats: mobi lrf rtf txt
  • Category: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
epub Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression download

Home Browse Books Book details, Riding the Rails: Teenagers on. .

Home Browse Books Book details, Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move during. Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move during the Great Depression. This book has as its primary source thousands of letters sent to Michael Uys and Lexy Lovell, coproducers of the documentary film Riding the Rails. A Tale of Two Depressions: Come the Next Catastrophe, We Will Rue Governments' Cowardice in Failing to Reform the Banks By Jacques, Martin New Statesman (1996), Vol. 138, No. 4960, August 3, 2009. Clinton and Teen Sex By Cockburn, Alexander The Nation, Vol. 258, No. 8, February 28, 1994.

During the Great Depression about a quarter-million people under the age . for hard times to soften.

During the Great Depression about a quarter-million people under the age of 21. struck out on their own to spend months, and even years, as hoboes, cris-crossing. Errol Lincoln Uys’s Riding the Rails recounts the experi-. book so much in the spirit of the men and women whose lives on the road are detailed. between its covers that any criticism seems somehow misplaced.

Riding the Rails book . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Errol Lincoln Uys (Goodreads Author).

George Phillips in Riding the Rails At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage .

George Phillips in Riding the Rails At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America. Some left home out of desperation and went looking for work and a better life, sometimes traveling hundreds of miles on the rumor of a job waiting farther down the line. Based on the award-winning documentary, this book dispels the myths of a hobo existence and reveals the hard stories of a daring generation of American teenagers-forgotten heroes-who survived some of the hardest times in our nations' history.

During the Great Depression, more than 250,000 children left their homes and hopped freight trains crisscrossing . Errol Lincoln Uys. about this book: "A remarkable story! A riveting book of hope and hardship during one of America's bleakest eras.

During the Great Depression, more than 250,000 children left their homes and hopped freight trains crisscrossing the United States. They were looking for work and adventure; some wanted to leave their homes, and some had to. They grew up in speeding. The reader can all but hear the lonesome wail at every whistle-stop. At the height of the Great Depression, a quarter of a million teenagers left their homes and hopped freight trains crisscrossing the country.

At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America

At the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America. Others left out of boredom; still others with a wanderlust and romantic idea of life on the road.

During the Great Depression, more than 250,000 children left their homes and hopped on freight . Riding the Rails gives us the stories of their travels in their own words and tells us what happened to them in the years since.

During the Great Depression, more than 250,000 children left their homes and hopped on freight trains crisscrossing the country.

During the Great Depression, more than 250, 000 teenagers left their homes and hopped freight trains crisscrossing the .

During the Great Depression, more than 250, 000 teenagers left their homes and hopped freight trains crisscrossing the United States. They were looking for work and adventure; some wanted to leave their homes. Uys is author of the acclaimed international best-seller, Brazil, the first work of fiction to depict five centuries of a great nation's extraordinary history, its evolution from colony to kingdom, from empire to modern republic.

But as Errol Lincoln Uys reminds us, in Riding the Rails . The oral histories, letters, and memoirs that comprise this book provide a fascinating and detailed look at life on the road, and recover a slice of Depression history that is both enlightening and entertaining.

But as Errol Lincoln Uys reminds us, in Riding the Rails: Teenagers on the Move During the Great Depression, the good old days didn't look as good in the 1930s: Children as young as fourteen years old were often obliged to work. When they could not (or would not) they generally left home, sometimes at their parents' insistence. Citation: Grace Palladino.

"There is no feeling in the world like sitting in a side-door Pullman and watching the world go by, listening to the clickety-clack of the wheels, hearing that old steam whistle blowing for crossings and towns." -George Phillips in Riding the RailsAt the height of the Great Depression, 250,000 teenage hoboes were riding the rails and roaming America. Some left home out of desperation and went looking for work and a better life, sometimes traveling hundreds of miles on the rumor of a job waiting farther down the line. Others left out of boredom; still others with a wanderlust and romantic idea of life on the road.The restless youth of these boxcar boys and girls, many who went from "middle-class gentility to scrabble-ass poor" overnight, is recaptured in Riding the Rails. Based on the award-winning documentary, this book dispels the myths of a hobo existence and reveals the hard stories of a daring generation of American teenagers-forgotten heroes-who survived some of the hardest times in our nations' history. Whether you're a "gaycat" (novice rider) or a "dingbat" (seasoned hobo), Riding the Rails is entertaining and inspiring, recapturing a time when the country was "dying by inches."
Comments (7)

Mullador
After seeing the documentary "Riding the Rails" as an episode of The American Experience series on PBS, I read this companion book authored by the father / father-in-law of the couple who made the film. Using statistics, vignettes, first person narrative accounts, and 54 black and white photos, the book creates a vivid impression of the lives of hundreds of thousands of American teenagers who, looking for work, or seeking adventure, or in an effort to ease the burden on their families, left their homes during the Depression and hopped trains to travel the country, living as hobos in the 1930s. 
Surprisingly, the tale contains many lessons that remain relevant today.
This is the story of a generation of Americans for whom growing up meant preparing themselves for the road rather than having the road prepared for them. It's a reminder of how important everything can be in one's youth, when everything is still recent enough to seem important and matter.
There are some heartbeakingly sad accounts of people who blamed themselves personally for the struggles and financial hardships which resulted from the collapse of an economic structure that they had no control over, that was beyond understanding, and which had failed them in so many ways. Those who succeeded were those who managed to cling to hope, or who encountered someone who took an interest at a critical time, or maybe were just lucky that at least a president like Roosevelt was in charge. 
After seeing the film, I found this volume to be quite intense and well worth the read.
(Note: I read the 1999 hardcover edition published by TV Books which only had about half a dozen typos -- on pages 58, 60, 189, 199, 232, 243...)
Gldasiy
I am halfway through this book and don't want it to end. It is the story of a dark passage in our history, the Great Depression. It was a time when money and food were so scarce that families asked boys as young as twelve or fourteen to head out to fend for themselves. Others left voluntarily to ease the burden on their parents, and still others left for a chance to see the country. Girls, often dressed as boys, joined their ranks. Uys has done a masterful job of putting this book together so it flows. While narrating, he combines memories of the youths who took to the rails as children growing up all too fast. Interspersed are memoirs of many, now elderly, who put pen to paper to tell their stories. The author paints a clear picture of the reality that was the Great Depression, the hobo jungles that sprang up, the life of the migrant workers, all reminiscent of Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath." Only here it is more searing. These are no fictional characters, these are real life stories depicting great suffering as well as fond memories created. The stories of those to whom the rails still call. Don't miss this memorable book. There is also a documentary film based on the book which is available from Amazon.
Soustil
This is an excellent study of an overlooked bit of US history. Well researched, engagingly written, and well illustrated. For instance it has one of the better descriptions of the CCC program during the Great Depression; and haunting views of what could have gone wrong among American youth. A must read - cogent for our current national situation.
GODMAX
My interest in this book was sparked by a bit of family history. A great-uncle of mine hoboed on trains before the 1920s. Born in 1900, he was attempting to hop a train in 1919 in Chicago, but lost his grip, fell from the car, and lost a leg beneath the train. All I know about this uncle was from a newspaper clipping from 1919 when a brave reporter interviewed my great-uncle just before he died from the infection in his leg.
The stories in "Riding the Rails" were tremendously moving to me. It gave me a perspecitive of the Depression and of Hoboes I hadn't had before. The personal stories were incredible, and the lucidity of expression by these people looking back on those difficult years was accurately relayed in the book. More than once I had to stop reading because of the tears in my eyes. I know this must sound melodramatic, but this book really moved me. But also, I must say this book reaffirmed my faith in human kindness and the perseverance of the human spirit.
Beazerdred
My father, as a young man, rode the rails from Massachusetts to California. He didn't talk much about it. Reading this book helped me realize the hard times he faced during the Great Depression and the possible people and places he encountered moving West.
Painbrand
Great book to read and just imagine the lives of those people.

Very buggy iOS app though. This new app is frustrating.
Jaberini
I enjoyed Riding the Rails. It was so informative and well put together and a piece of history that should be examined. Very interesting.
This book was very helpful! I'm researching this topic for an historical novel I'm working on and this was great information. I'd heard a bit from my father who "rode the rails" during the Depression, but he died when I was very young, so I certainly didn't get a full picture from him.

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