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by R. W. Southern

  • ISBN: 0300002300
  • Author: R. W. Southern
  • ePub ver: 1823 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1823 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 288
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (1992)
  • Formats: txt lrf lrf rtf
  • Category: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
epub The Making of the Middle Ages download

Southern's The Making of the Middle Ages (1953) was a seminal work, and established Southern's .

Southern's The Making of the Middle Ages (1953) was a seminal work, and established Southern's reputation as a medievalist.

So read this book if you want to learn more about the history of the middle ages and the growth of invdividualism in the . It's impossible to read this book in anything other than the light of the post-War Britain .

So read this book if you want to learn more about the history of the middle ages and the growth of invdividualism in the west. You won't be dissapointed. Southern was writing in: countering the Victorians he remains locked into a discourse of cultural evolution. The German societies of Victorian England were quickly forgotten after WWI, presenting something of an embarrassment and a little of that is present here too. Southern sets out in this book to write a history of European thought of the eleventh and All roads lead from Rome?

Before Southern wrote this book in 1952, the period has traditionally been called the High Middle Ages or the . And it is for that reason "Making" is so often classified as one of the most important medieval history books of the 20th century.

Before Southern wrote this book in 1952, the period has traditionally been called the High Middle Ages or the "Renaissance of the 12th Century". However Southern sees it as more than a Renaissance (usually thought of as a period of re discovery of classical texts and ideas), but also a period of new and original ideas and institutions. Southern says the period "had been overtaken by a creative spirit, which was not derived from the past, but nourished by a medley of influences both past and present.

The Gospel Book of which this picture fonns part belonged to Judith of. .

The Gospel Book of which this picture fonns part belonged to Judith of Flanders, wife of Earl Tostig of Northumbria, who is probably depicted in the female figure clinging to the Cross. There was indeed a gleam of hope here: in Anjou, in the middle of the tenth century, we read of the Wlexpected discovery that the long depopulation ofwide stretches ofcOWltry had produced an Wlparalleled fertility in the soil.

This seminal book is required reading for any serious student of medieval history. The writer seems to have an almost uncanny sense of the psychology of Europe in medieval times, a true creator of the Middle Ages is he. Very well written, one of the best books i ever read on Medieval Europe.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Making of the Middle Ages. The New Middle Ages By Vodolazkin, Eugene First Things; A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life, No. 265, August/September 2016. The Making of the Middle Ages. The Children of Abraham: Judaism, Christianity, Islam/aristotle's Children: How Christians, Muslims, and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated the Middle Ages By Oakes, Edward T. First Things; A Monthly Journal of Religion and Public Life, No. 152, April 2005.

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Yale University Press 1976. History text; notees, bibliography, index, 280 pages.
Comments (7)

Laitchai
The Making of the Middle Ages is a study of the period 972 to 1204. Before Southern wrote this book in 1952, the period has traditionally been called the High Middle Ages or the "Renaissance of the 12th Century". However Southern sees it as more than a Renaissance (usually thought of as a period of *re* discovery of classical texts and ideas), but also a period of *new* and original ideas and institutions. Southern says the period "had been overtaken by a creative spirit, which was not derived from the past, but nourished by a medley of influences both past and present." What is the "creative spirit"? According to Southern, it is Romanticism, which can be defined as a heightened sense of self-consciousness in perceiving the physical and natural world, both in the secular and spiritual.

It was with the publication of "Making" that decades of subsequent research into the period has focused on Romanticism as the primary creative movement that helped propel European culture from a backwater throughout the early middle ages to a leading civilization by 1500. The Virgin Cult, courtly love, the Arthurian tradition, the origins of Gothic architecture, are just a few of the peculiar institutions and ideas that have been re-examined from a Romantic viewpoint. And it is for that reason "Making" is so often classified as one of the most important medieval history books of the 20th century. Further, it was groundbreaking stylistically because it legitimized speculative and imaginative cultural history, which has found many imitators, such as Peter Brown (The World of Late Antiquity) and Robin Lane Fox (Pagans and Christians). It's influence on generation or two of Medieval scholars can not be over-estimated and it still remains one of those classic books every medieval student is familiar with.

Although "Making" is accessible and readable by anyone, the books intent as described above is subtle and nuanced, in particular outside of the "state of the art" of medievalism in 1952 which saw the 12th century as a Renaissance at best, or a "dark age" at worst. This was a revolutionary and groundbreaking book for its day and is as interesting today for historiographical reasons, some of the actual content has since been refuted. Literary speaking, it is well written and delightful. It does contain interesting anecdotes about the period, but this is not a survey text and those looking for a introduction to the Middle Ages may be disappointed if not bedazzled.
Conjulhala
Focusing on a period of about 200-years, this brief study is very perceptive and it points out a number of important issues. These are both ideas and events that lead to profound changes in society and in the social contract between the various strata of these societies.

This is history at its finest. Not simply, this happened, then that happened, but what the impact of an event and the impact that the actions of principal players in society had on the life of the times. With the hindsight of 1000-years we can see clearly and appreciate the impact of seemingly disparate happenings.

History like this should be studies far more. Our current world outlook would be sharpened if we reminded ourselves of how our society and culture was forged. Ideas that we take for granted and never question were being hammered out with significant gains for the winners and colossal impacts for the losers. A king is anointed by God, does he also represent God? Is his power both spiritual and temporal or is the office simply administrative and military? We know the settled answer to this now, but at the time it could have gone the opposite way.

The ideas formed in this time lasted till the 1st World War and many are central to political organization today. This is history that should be studied and understood as it informs the very basis of our present society.
Keel
An acknolwedged classic of european history, R.W. Southern's "The Middle Ages" focuses on the period between 900 and 1200 A.D. His geopgraphic focus is mostly northern france, with some asides to Germany, Italy, Southern France and England. His main thesis is the idea that this period saw the emergence of a personal devotion to faith via monasticism that in turn prefigured the rise of invdividual identity in western culture.

No small accomplishment, that thesis, and no small accomplishment this book. Southern's style of writing is charming and concise. You don't get the thesis till the last chapter, but the preceding chapters are entertaining, enjoyable reading.

The author who turned me on to this book was the recently deceased Norman F. Cantor in his dishy "The Making of the Middle Ages", which I also recommend for any one who is reading on this subject outside the academy. Cantor's main point was to show how the empire building mind set of the "Annales" school of the history of the middle ages (which concentrates its focus on the role of the peasant in the society of the middle ages), had deprived other "schools" of much needed oxygen. Well, he didn't put it that way exactly, but that's what he said.

Cantor, of course, studied under Southern, so the bias is there. None the less, having read several books from the Annales school and none from Southern and his progeny, I would have to say that the two compliment one another (and Southern cites Marc Bloch, the much revered founder of Annales school).

So read this book if you want to learn more about the history of the middle ages and the growth of invdividualism in the west. You won't be dissapointed.
Mamuro
Excellent classic text in the field of medieval studies! A must read for all serious students and professional scholars of the middle ages.
Lailace
This is a very well written book that is worth the time to read it. You learn many things about a period of time that is long gone and about humans over time. I would advise my students to read this book.
I am hcv men
Southern was one of the best medieval historians of the 20th century. Reading this with his "Scholastic Humanism" makes a wonderful pairing for thinking about his views on the period from both the beginning and the end of his career.
Thordira
Nice and speedy service.
Met my expectations

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