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by Robert Reuland

  • ISBN: 0375505024
  • Author: Robert Reuland
  • ePub ver: 1654 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1654 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st Edition edition (June 8, 2004)
  • Formats: azw lrf docx rtf
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
epub Semiautomatic: A Novel download

With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn.

With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn. Drawing on his experience as a homicide prosecutor, Reuland Robert Reuland’s hard-edged yet elegant writing has drawn comparisonsto that of writers as far-flung as Chandler, Hemingway, and T. S. Eliot, but his voice is all his own.

Semiautomatic : a novel. Semiautomatic : a novel. by. Reuland, Rob, 1963-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Robert Charles Reuland (born 1963) is an American novelist and attorney. Reuland commenced his legal career in 1990 in Manhattan. Since 2001 Reuland has had a parallel career as a novelist. He is the author of two published novels, Hollowpoint (Random House 2001) and Semiautomatic (Random House 2004). Both books are set in the Brooklyn . s office, where Reuland worked an assistant district attorney between 1996 and 2001.

Robert Reuland is the author of two highly acclaimed novels, HOLLOWPOINT and SEMIAUTOMATIC. Both are set in the murky world of Brooklyn criminal justice. For many years, Mr. Reuland was an assistant DA in Brooklyn where he was assigned to the homicide bureau. Mr. Reuland’s new novel, BROOKLYN SUPREME, will be published in 2020. Find Us. Address 123 Main Street New York, NY 10001.

With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another . Gio vows to play this one by the book, yet the difficulty of doing that quickly becomes apparent

With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn. With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn. Drawing on his experience as a homicide prosecutor, Reuland captures lives on the edge, men and women working and dying in a very real world that most of us never see, although it exists right under our noses. Gio vows to play this one by the book, yet the difficulty of doing that quickly becomes apparent. He is paired with prosecutor Laurel Ashfield, and the two establish an instant mutual dislike.

Connected to: District attorney Dallas, Texas Legal thriller. Reuland's hard-edged but elegant writing is known for its gritty realism an. . Robert Charles Reuland. 1963-11-01) November 1, 1963 (age 55) Dallas, Texas. Reuland's hard-edged but elegant writing is known for its gritty realism and has drawn praise from Dennis Lehane, Alan Furst, and George Pelecanos. The New York Times said Hollowpoint "may just keep you up all night.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). If I were to pick one point to complain about, I wish he would have included a map or two of Kyushu, the island where he has the Americans invading.

Аудиокнига "Semiautomatic", Robert Reuland. Читает Jason Collins. The Testament: A Novel. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Robert Reuland15 июля 2008 г. Blackstone Audio Inc.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island is the quintessential British adventure story, and like so many such is aimed at a young and chiefly male readership.

Robert Reuland’s hard-edged yet elegant writing has drawn comparisonsto that of writers as far-flung as Chandler, Hemingway, and T. S. Eliot, but his voice is all his own. With Semiautomatic, Reuland delivers another fist-in-the-gut novel set inside the courtroom and on the darkened street corners of Brooklyn. Drawing on his experience as a homicide prosecutor, Reuland captures lives on the edge, men and women working and dying in a very real world that most of us never see, although it exists right under our noses.Semiautomatic follows Reuland’s acclaimed debut, Hollowpoint, which introduced antihero Andrew Giobberti, a prosecutor reckoning with his daughter’s accidental death while investigating a murder case that hits far too close to home. Now, eighteen months later, we find Gio gun-shy, living a rote existence, working in the sleepily academic Appeals Bureau. Then an opportunity comes for personal and professional rebirth: a murder trial.Gio vows to play this one by the book, yet the difficulty of doing that quickly becomes apparent. He is paired with prosecutor Laurel Ashfield, and the two establish an instant mutual dislike. A key witness disappears. The case detective is conspicuously unavailable. The district attorney himself seems to have far more interest in the trial than the mundane facts would seem to merit. And Gio learns that it was not by chance that he was picked for this case.Gio is swept into the seamy, seedy world of Brooklyn politics and prosecution, caught between decent lives and indecent corruption, between streets that are already too dangerous and a killer who will most certainly kill again. And in a world where right and wrong depend on everything from where you were born to where you were last standing, making the wrong choice may cost one man his career, or another man his life.
Comments (7)

WinDImmortaL
I liked Hollowpoint, but I really like the follow-on, Semiautomatic. If you read one, you must start with the debut novel, as there is a tremendous amount of back story that Reuland does not repeat in sufficient detail in this book.

After Hollowpoint, we saw a down on his luck assistant DA do his best to insert the right outcome into a case he was handling for the prosecutor's office. The author's prior work as a DA there lent a lot of charm to the first book and all of that continues here. As with the first book, the protagonist is handled a 'simple' case that turns out to be anything but. He's pared with a partner who has no experience in prosecuting murder cases, and they develop a very tentative and complex relationship while they try to move forward with the case. As you might expect, there are bigger forces and a larger agenda here at work. Watching them figure this out and what they're prepared to do about it is a real treat.

I wrote in my review of Hollowpoint that the sense of place for Brooklyn was strong. It's even stronger here. You can practically smell the steam of the summer shower coming off of the still hot pavements.

Reuland is an author to keep an eye on. I for one will be following him.

Recommended highly.
Zahisan
It would be a mistake to call this a legal thriller, just as it would be a mistake to believe that what happens in most American courtrooms is legally thrilling. This is taut, believable urban crime drama from someone batting .1000 right out of the box on his first two novels. It's not plot-crazed Grisham. It's a story and characters to think about and a protagonist you can actually buy. I loved it, just as I loved Hollowpoint, his first. The second is more enjoyable if you read HP and got the setup but Semiautomatic also stands on its own as a first-rate urban crime novel. Very good stuff.Can't waint for the next one.
Tisicai
Brilliant, insightful page-turner on what it is like to prosecute murders in an overworked big-city homicide unit. Reuland is a superb writer and must be one heck of a good lawyer. Unlike many (but not all) lawyer-writers, he gets it right. Too bad this and Hollowpoint are his only two published books.
Wizer
My son wanted this book for Christmas, so I looked it up, ordered it, and received it very quickly. Thanks!
Fararala
I have loved all of Robert Reuland's novels that I have read in this series. I only hope he writes more!!!!!!!
Risa
I agree both with the people who liked this novel and with those who didn't. The level of writing is well above average, as is knowledge of the subject. Both are so welcome after a J. D. Robb "In Death" novel which is utterly mediocre in comparison.

Except... Mr. Reuland absolutely refuses to use a contraction (e.g. "won't" or "can't") so ALL the dialog (uneducated criminals included) is unbearably stilted. "She will not tell me, and I cannot insist, because we had not...". Nobody talks or thinks like this. How an otherwise perceptive writer could be so obtuse or so self-indulgent - and his editor permit it - is beyond me. It's like avoiding every word with the letter 'e'. Even in the excellent reading by Jason Collins this soon becomes excruciating. I soon began listening as much for an exception to this as to the relatively modest plot. Result: one contraction noted in the entire book.

Also, as mentioned by another reviewer, conversations between the principals are often unrealistically fragmented. People are constantly breaking off just when they're about to explain something important. This authorial trick creates many misunderstandings to advance the plot, but after a few of these the reader is thinking "just spit it out, for heavens sake!".

Mr. Reuland is a talented author and could easily do without the idiosyncrasies I'm criticising. I hope he'll iron these out of his future books. But, what author ever pays attention to the lay reader's opinion?
Zonama
SEMIAUTOMATIC is Robert Reuland's second book following on from his impressive debut with HOLLOW POINT. Like his first book it is set in Brooklyn and features homicide prosecutor Andrew Giobberti. Also, like his first book, SEMIAUTOMATIC focuses heavily on the legal system and the faith that the central characters place in it.

It's been eighteen months since the events of HOLLOW POINT took place and Andrew Giobberti has been removed from his position in the DA's Homicide Bureau to the safer, more sedate dead end that is the Appeals Bureau. But now the DA has decided that Gio has served his penance and is now ready to prosecute homicide cases again.

The homicide case in question is the shooting of the owner of a bodega by a young black man who was robbing the store. At first glance it looks like a straightforward case with a witness who has identified Haskin Pool, the defendant, and is willing and able to testify to what he saw. But after reading through the case records, Gio can't help but feel that there is something more to the case that he's not been told about.

Gio is taking over the case from Laurel Ashfield, a young prosecutor who has been recently appointed to the Homicide Bureau. Laurel had worked the case from the moment it broke until trial only to have Gio brought in to take over at the last minute. Gio expects her to be resentful of him for being bumped to second chair, but surprisingly she is anything but. The reason that she's not is the big mystery of the story. It starts out as a nagging itch but soon leads to the greatest cause for division between the two lawyers.

This is a rather unusual book because although it revolves around a murder trial and features the prosecuting attorney who is trying the case, we never really experience any of the usual courtroom drama scenes. The only time the courtroom comes into play is in between sessions with Gio and Laurel discussing points of the case. As each day's proceedings actually begin we invariably fade to black and then cut to a later scene outside the court.

Social and moral values are put under the microscope as arguments from the younger, idealistic but rather naïve Laurel are countered by the more seasoned and realistic Gio. Reuland concentrates more on emotions and personalities pushing this mystery into a category beyond the mere legal thriller standing. It's dark, confrontational and proceeds to grab your attention as the true story of the case gradually unfolds.

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