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by Ben Pastor

  • ISBN: 1904738826
  • Author: Ben Pastor
  • ePub ver: 1316 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1316 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 210
  • Publisher: Bitter Lemon Press; F First Edition edition (February 21, 2012)
  • Formats: mobi mbr lrf rtf
  • Category: Mystery
  • Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
epub Liar Moon (Martin Bora) download

Ben Pastor spares her German military policeman few of the horrors of war as she transports him from one WWII battlefield to another in her intriguing series of frontline crime

Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Ben Pastor spares her German military policeman few of the horrors of war as she transports him from one WWII battlefield to another in her intriguing series of frontline crime. In Liar Moon Martin Bora is thrust into the middle of confused fighting in Northern Italy and comes up against a band of partisans in the most dramatic fashion at the start of the book. The edgy mood washes over his subsequent crime solving efforts.

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Ben Pastor, born in Italy, lived for thirty years in the United States, working as a university professor in Vermont, before returning to her home country. Liar Moon is the second in the Martin Bora series and follows on from the success of Lumen, also published by Bitter Lemon Press. Ben Pastor is the author of other novels including the highly acclaimed The Water Thief and The Fire Waker, and is considered one of the most talented writers in the field of historical fiction. In 2008 she won the prestigious Premio Zaragoza for best historical fiction

Praise for the Martin Bora series:"The tone of Liar Moon has a flu-like grimness, appropriate the 1943 setting. Pastor is excellent at providing details (silk stockings, movie magazines, cigarettes) that light up the setting. -Booklist"Lumen's plot is well crafted, her prose shap. a disturbing mix of detection and reflection. -Publisher's WeeklyRome, 1944.

Praise for Ben Pastor's Lumen: Pastor’s plot is well crafted, her prose sharp. Having survived hell on the Russian front, Wehrmacht major and aristocrat Baron Martin von Bora is sent to Verona. Publishers Weekly Rivets the reader with its twist of historical realities. A historical piece, it faithfully reproduces the grim canvas of war. A character study, it captures the thoughts and actions of real people, not stereotypes. The Free Lance-Star And don’t miss Lumen by Ben Pastor.

You can read book Liar Moon by Ben Pastor in our library for absolutely free. e space reminded Bora of the summers at his godmother’s in Rome (hot afternoons, day trips, reading forbidden books, the first sins against innocence). He stayed serious, but could have smiled. A drooling, cross-eyed Pomeranian quit chewing on a magazine to snarl against him. Claretta was a high-breasted, slim girl with an interesting taste in perfumes, as Bora was amusedly to remark later. A disturbing mix of detection and reflection

Praise for Ben Pastor's Lumen: Pastor’s plot is well crafted, her prose sharp. Praise for Ben Pastor's Lumen: Pastor’s plot is well crafted, her prose sharp. Publishers Weekly "Rivets the reader with its twist of historical realities.

2001) (The second book in the Martin Bora series) A novel by Ben Pastor. Italy, September 1943. The Italian government switches sides and declares war on Germany. The north of Italy is controlled by the fascist puppets of Germany; the south liberated by Allied forces fighting their way up the peninsula. The prime suspect is the.

Ben Pastor (March 4, 1950 – present), pseudonym of Maria Verbena Volpi, is an author born in Rome. She has Italian and US citizenship.

Praise for Ben Pastor's Lumen:

“Pastor’s plot is well crafted, her prose sharp. . . . A disturbing mix of detection and reflection.”—Publishers Weekly

"Rivets the reader with its twist of historical realities. A historical piece, it faithfully reproduces the grim canvas of war. A character study, it captures the thoughts and actions of real people, not stereotypes.”—The Free Lance-Star

“And don’t miss Lumen by Ben Pastor. . . . An interesting, original, and melancholy tale.”—Literary Review

Italy, September 1943. The Italian government switches sides and declares war on Germany. The north of Italy is controlled by the fascist puppets of Germany; the south liberated by Allied forces fighting their way up the peninsula.

Having survived hell on the Russian front, Wehrmacht major and aristocrat Baron Martin von Bora is sent to Verona. He is ordered to investigate the murder of a prominent local fascist: a bizarre death threatening to discredit the regime’s public image. The prime suspect is the victim’s twenty-eight-year-old widow Clara.

Haunted by his record of opposition to SS policies in Russia, Bora must watch his step. Against the backdrop of relentless anti-partisan warfare and the tragedy of the Holocaust, a breathless chase begins.

Ben Pastor, born and now back in Italy, lived for thirty years in the United States, working as a university professor in Vermont. The first in the Martin Bora series, Lumen, was published by Bitter Lemon Press in May 2011.

Comments (7)

Wrathshaper
On the face of it, creating a likable Wehrmacht officer that a reader can empathize with is quite the challenge: right off the bat most will be disinclined to have much sympathy for a man who fights with the Nazis. Yet Ben Pastor has done just this with Martin von Bora, a poised, exceptionally polite, very well mannered, and very well educated Abwehr officer who descends from a distinguished family with an illustrious past. Bora (he soon drops the ennobling ’von’) is Catholic, married, and in his late twenties when the war begins.

What makes Martin Bora so interesting is his complexity, the richness and fulness of his character, and the nuances of his personality. No, he is not a detective, nor does he come from a police or investigative background (his role in Abwehr is essentially counter-intelligence). And although a patriot, he’s no Nazi. Even though hIs stepfather (a respected retired general) raised him in the stereotypic Prussian manner, there is no sympathy with Herr Hitler at home.

In a way, Bora calls to mind Ernst Jünger from his war memoir, ‘Storm of Steel’, a book often criticized for excessive militarism and the glorification of war. This analogy may be somewhat overstated as Bora is certainly not as gung-ho as Jünger, and he is clearly better educated, more cultivated, and more reflective. Nevertheless, there is that teutonic element that resides within him as well.

Archly self-disciplined and a model of self-control, it is his ability to take himself out of a situation (and the emotions of the moment) to reflect, plan, and then react in a measured proportional way that makes him both so effective and so fascinating. He may not be liked by colleagues and commanding officers but his ability and character earn him their respect and more importantly, their trust.

Despite being little over-drawn (Bora corresponds with his former professor, Martin Heidegger; his late father was a renowned opera conductor and a composer; he is acquainted with cardinals and high church officials; he speaks English, German, Italian, and Russian fluently, knows some Spanish besides being a latinist), I still find myself continually intrigued by him, he is a very engaging (if not always likable) man.

And Ben Pastor is a very intriguing author. Italian by birth, she spent decades teaching in the United States. Clearly she exceptionally well-educated and knowledgeable (as the surfeit of historical, biographical, geographic, and ethnographic details attest). Not withstanding her years on American college campuses her syntax and vocabulary betray her European origin and sensibility, which for me add to the charm of her writing.

As for the books themselves, each of the five in the series so far (a sixth, is scheduled for publication in 2019) are quite different. The first, ‘Lumen’ (2011) is set in Cracow in 1939 where Bora investigates the murder of a convent abbess, aided in part by a Catholic priest from Chicago. The second, ‘Liar Moon’ (2012) (perhaps the weakest of the series) is set in 1943 in Verona where Bora has been sent to investigate the death of prominent local fascist. The third, ‘A Dark Song of Blood’ (2014), is set in Rome in 1943 and centers on Bora’s investigation of the death of a German secretary with the help of a local police officer and involvement from the Roman Curia. The fourth, 'Tin Sky' (2015) takes place in the Ukraine in 1943 (after the battle for Stalingrad) and involves the defection and then death of a prominent Soviet general. The fifth, ‘The Road to Ithaca’ (2017) is set in Crete in 1941, where Bora investigates a massacre of civilians initially believed to be the work of invading German paratroopers.

Earlier reviewers have provided excellent analysis of the individual books, and readers are directed there for detailed discussion. It should be noted that the publication order (which may be the order in which the books were written) is not chronological. For example the fifth book, ‘The Road to Ithaca’ is set a few years before the fourth book ‘Tin Sky’. As such, unlike many series, it is not necessary to read them in order.

To help put my comments in better perspective, let me forthcoming about my tastes: For me the protagonist is the most important element in any series, and the Martin Bora books are if nothing else character driven (perhaps to a fault, as some readers may find the action slow). I am a stickler for details (historic, geographic, biographical, etc.) not because I am very knowledgable, but when I do catch an error it leaps out and breaks the spell of the narrative. In this, Pastor excels. Lastly as a comparison, for me David Downing’s station series (featuring John Russell) are perhaps the best I’ve read.

If you’re intrigued, download a sample from the e-book which (unlike a lot of skimpy samples) will give you a good preview of both Pastor and Bora.
Bloodfire
Ben Pastor spares her German military policeman few of the horrors of war as she transports him from one WWII battlefield to another in her intriguing series of frontline crime. In “Liar Moon” Martin Bora is thrust into the middle of confused fighting in Northern Italy and comes up against a band of partisans in the most dramatic fashion at the start of the book. The edgy mood washes over his subsequent crime solving efforts. This time round he is given support by a capable, but conflicted Italian policeman. Sandro Guido enjoys a difficult professional relationship with Bora, but unusually manages to break through Bora's reserve to the beginnings of friendship despite the huge differences between them. Pastor's plot is another rather dense offering but the welcome human element to Bora's shattered life and body helps balance things out.
BOND
It's late December 1943 and southern Italy has been invaded by the Allies. The Germans are taking over the running of what remains of Mussolini's Fascist state. In Verona, in the north of the country, aristocratic German Army Major Martin Bora has been assigned to bring increasing partisan attacks against the Germans and Fascist forces under control. Bora's prior experience as a battlefield detective brings him the unwanted additional task of working with the local Italian police in resolving the murder of a high-ranking Italian politician/businessman. He partners with a local copper, Sandro Guidi, to investigate the killing and an interesting police procedural follows.

As good as the murder/investigation story line is, the great strength of this novel is the wonderful characters that author Ben Pastor has created and put into play. Major Bora himself, is a complex and conflicted figure who has seen far too much brutality and misery in Spain, Poland and Russia to pursue with much enthusiasm the killer of the clearly corrupt and criminal victim. He is tortured by his past roles as a Wehrmacht officer and foresees the eventual loss of the war by Germany. He also suffers greatly physically from wounds inflicted in a grenade attack when he first arrived in Italy and is hounded by the Nazi security forces who do not consider him politically reliable for acts of conscience he has shown in the past. The Italian characters are almost as good and multi-dimensional, as they struggle with a political situation that is rapidly changing and in which their lives are threatened daily.

This well written novel is intelligent and far from transparent as the storyline moves toward its conclusion. As Pastor's other novels transcend their genre niches, so does "Liar Moon". A really good read by a talented writer.
Hilarious Kangaroo
This is the second Bora book I've read and like the first one, Tin Sky, I got lost somewhere along the way. Pastor is a solid wordsmith and writes authoritatively about her characters (which are very well developed) and the setting. This one takes place near Verona, Italy in the waning days of the war. Colonel Bora is a fascinating character as is Italian Inspector Guida, but I just found the pace of the plot a little too slow and its subtletly more of an obstacle. I think my problem is that I have to read Pastor's books more carefully than my usual fare. I'll keep trying....
Valawye
Not often that we see a German office of WW2 as the hero, but Martin Bora fills that role, figure on Columbo in a Wehrmacht uniform. Enjoyable seeing the overlap of the competing groups in Italy as they are still settling old feuds and setting themselves up to handle the aftermath of the Alied invasion. Think this is an interesting and unusual concept. I have a couple of more Martin Bora books up to read shortly ... if that tells you anything.
Danskyleyn
I enjoy historical fiction and this fits the bill. Not al Germans were Nazi's. Well written and seemingly well researched. If you like the Bernie Gunther novels of Phillip Kerr, you will like Ben Parsons.

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