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epub Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide download

by David A. Taylor

  • ISBN: 020184463X
  • Author: David A. Taylor
  • ePub ver: 1884 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1884 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 384
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional (October 4, 2003)
  • Formats: lrf doc lit rtf
  • Category: Money
  • Subcategory: Management & Leadership
epub Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide download

In Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide, best-selling author David Taylor shows you how to assemble a killer supply chain using the knowledge, technology, and tools employed in supply-chain success stories.

In Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide, best-selling author David Taylor shows you how to assemble a killer supply chain using the knowledge, technology, and tools employed in supply-chain success stories. Using his signature fast-track summaries, graphics, and sidebars, Taylor offers a clear roadmap to understanding and solving the complex problems of supply-chain management. Modern manufacturing has driven down the time and cost of the production process, leaving supply chains as the final frontier for cost reduction and competitive advantage.

Written by best-selling author David A. Taylor, this is a guide to understanding and solving the complex problems of supply chain management. This shift in focus is quickly changing the nature of business competition. The battle is no longer company vs. company, it's supply chain vs. supply chain. The formula for winning this new battle is assembling a killer supply chain - the one that, like those of Dell and WalMart, will let them deliver products to their customers faster, better, and cheaper than anyone else.

A Non-Supply Chain Manager's Guide to Supply Chains. com User, October 17, 2003

A Non-Supply Chain Manager's Guide to Supply Chains. com User, October 17, 2003.

Start by marking Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide By David A. Taylor, P. Report "Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide". Managing Closed-Loop Supply Chains.

Not the same David Taylor who wrote this manager's guide. Chapter 10 Forecasting Demand. 208. The concept of the tipping point is best explained by Malcolm Gladwell in his compelling book, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2002.

This is one of the best overviews of the supply chain I have ever read. If you are lookig to gain an understanding of supply chain issues and terms, this is the book for you. Categories: Business\Management. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Building Internet Firewalls.

Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide. Object Technology: A Manager's Guide. David A. Before founding Enterprise Engines, In. a company that develops supply-chain software, Dr. Taylor worked as a consultant helping Fortune 500 companies adopt object technology.

Find nearly any book by David A. Taylor. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Supply Chains: A Manager's Guide: ISBN 9780201844634 (978-0-201-84463-4) Softcover, Addison-Wesley Professional, 2003. Tall Ship Odysseys: Fifty Years of Operation Sail. ISBN 9780939526260 (978-39526-26-0) Hardcover, Operation Sail, 2010.

During the past twenty years, companies have reduced the time and cost of the manufacturing process. Now, they are attempting to streamline their supply chains in the same way, but they are struggling with this initiative. This shift in focus is quickly changing the nature of business competition. The battle is no longer company vs. company, it's supply chain vs. supply chain. The formula for winning this new battle is assembling a killer supply chain -- the one that, like those of Dell and WalMart, will let them deliver products to their customers faster, better, and cheaper than anyone else. Written by best-selling author David A. Taylor, this is a guide to understanding and solving the complex problems of supply chain management. Using Taylor's signature fast-track summaries, graphics, sidebars, and additional content and exercises on the CD-ROM and Web site, readers will easily grasp the critical insights into this demanding subject, and walk away knowing just what they need to know in order to contribute effectively to their company's supply chain success.
Comments (7)

Tuliancel
This is one of the best books I've bought on this subject. It provides no nonsense advice and gives clear guidance from an extremely experienced engineer. I regularly refer to the book during my work week. Good stuff!
Brol
This is one of the best overviews of the supply chain I have ever read. If you are lookig to gain an understanding of supply chain issues and terms, this is the book for you.
Aloo
Applying some of Tate's basic principles at our Software as a Service company has increased our team's productivity and the quality of our product dramatically. The team has never been more engaged, and now people have some breathing room to be more creative to come up with more extraordinary solutions to complex problems. Amazing!

If you play any role in a company that makes software you should read this book.
Drelahuginn
Perhaps the single best point made in this book is in the Introduction. As a programmer, you are probably aware (actually you SHOULD be aware) of what design patterns are, even if you don't know too many of them. Famously, these grew out of observations made in architecture, that there are a few very common design patterns in modern buildings and city planning. It has been found in programming that design patterns are indeed a key observation. But an unfortunate consequence was that architectural design is also taken to be a good metaphor for software design. Many programmers believe this. Tate certainly believes that metaphors are vital for understanding software. But the metaphor of architecture is a dreadful choice. A building is fixed, after it is completed. Very difficult to make significant structural changes. Often, if pushed, one has to demolish the building and start over. Yet software is commonly asked to be continually changed. Certainly, this is true of successful, widely used code. The peril of the architecture metaphor is that believing in it elides one into a monolithic waterfall approach to software design. The waterfall is now widely recognised as badly flawed.

Even if you take nothing else from this book, the above is well worth your time in understanding the limits of metaphor. While it sounds like an abstract literary finesse, using the wrong metaphor can lead to a bad design process.

The bulk of the text has many suggestions about designing and programming, in the expectation that the code will have to be continually modified. Without getting too close to Extreme Programming, which has many detractors of its own.

One suggestion is that the long hours put in by a team is not necessarily a sign of strength. A team might occasionally do this, to meet a deadline. But too often can be a symptom of misdesign and mismanagement. As well as lowering the productivity of the group.

Another suggestion is simply to fix all bugs as soon as they are known. Before going on to add new functionality. This helps you maintain a stable base, and prevents the number of bugs from exploding.

There are more suggestions. Most, like those above, have been known for decades. The book is a useful collection of these.
Kamick
Would you like to start practicing agile development without the "extreme-ism" of Extreme Programming (XP)? Sustainable Software Development: An Agile Perspective by Kevin Tate does a good job in its explanation without some of the emotional baggage that XP often encounters.

Contents: Sustainable Software Development; Unsustainable Software Development and its Causes; The Principles of Sustainable Software Development; Working Product; Defect Prevention; Emphasis on Design; Continual Refinement; Culture Change and Sustainable Development; Practice Summary; Extreme Programming and Sustainable Software Development; Sustainable Software Development and the CMM; Recommended Reading; Conclusion; References; Index

If you've studied any of the agile methodologies currently in vogue, you'll recognize most of the material in here. There's the emphasis on short iterations, fixing defects early and often, continuous builds, and so forth. What I liked most about this book however, was that it sounded much more "reasonable" than XP. XP can often come across as a "cult", where you have to take it all or nothing. That's not true, but for some it becomes a religious issue (like pair programming). Tate takes a more reasonable approach, outlining a complete program that will definitely lead to shorter development cycles and higher quality. But he also recognizes that it doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing approach, and that even minor steps can pay off with big dividends. The chapters from Working Product through Continual Refinement are broken up into a number of "Practices" that allow you to focus on one aspect of agile, sustainable development. Once you understand how that works and how it plays together with everything else, you can then put it into play in your environment. The Practice Summary chapter is a short summary of all the practices together, along with indicators next to each practice that is a keystone practice to making it all work. If you do nothing else, implementing the keystone practices will improve your development life by leaps and bounds...

While it may not be groundbreaking material, it's solid and workable. It's also packaged in such a way that you can start to implement lightweight methodologies without the preconceptions that XP often has (no documentation, no design, etc.). For the right audience, it's definitely a suggested title.

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