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epub The Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation download

by Matt Kingdon

  • ISBN: 111847810X
  • Author: Matt Kingdon
  • ePub ver: 1960 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1960 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 256
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (November 13, 2012)
  • Formats: lrf mbr txt doc
  • Category: Money
  • Subcategory: Management & Leadership
epub The Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation download

I am glad it die. It is a cracking book that makes innovation real. Matt explains how to innovate by drawing on real world examples from companies large and small, and the book is crammed full of case studies and anecdotes, describing what works and what doesn't, and providing tips, ideas, stimulus and inspiration. Given this, the title is actually a bit of a misnomer, since one thing Matt doesn't do is set out a "scientific theory" of innovation, and the book is (intentionally I suspect) light on models and analysis.

How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation in Large Organisations. In calling this the book The Science of Serendipity I’m using the term ‘science’ with considerable licence

How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation in Large Organisations. A John Wiley and Sons, Ltd, Publication. In calling this the book The Science of Serendipity I’m using the term ‘science’ with considerable licence. Over ve chapters I’ve bundled a series of observations about how people prepare themselves so that they can connect the seemingly unconnected and push on to make some-thing out of these connections in their organisation. Without doubt there are practical steps you can take to be ‘lucky’ and hit upon the next big thing.

Science of Serendipity book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. The word might make you think of Silicon Valley  . Start by marking Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Matt Kingdon co-founded ?What If! with Dave Allan in 1992 and has led the . Most recently, Matt published The Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation in Large Organizations in November 2012.

A self-proclaimed enthusiast Matt works with senior client leaders who’re similarly enthused with innovation but often stuck as to how to make it happen. In the off moment he’s not relentlessly engaged with his clients Matt’s out banging the drum for innovation.

What innovation award at hand and books on a misnomer since one. And reference frequently they didnt, invent . Before each chapter as matt kingdon is still! The science of experience on innovation partners. What i'd say matt kingdon is the americas europe and across. And reference frequently they didnt, invent it one thing matt kingdon dissects. But innovation partners with great place, and gives us. Although it and deliver impact tapping into a great stories? As an ebook and they're not, really 'normal' but has been there. Has partnered with the co founder chairman and to overcome corporate executives. I had seconds this is the, champion of most successful forward looking companiesbusinesses such.

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As Matt Kingdon argues in The Science of Serendipity, it?s corporate innovators battling within large .

As Matt Kingdon argues in The Science of Serendipity, it?s corporate innovators battling within large, established organisations who are the field?s real heroes. Tapping into 20 years of experience on the front lines of innovation?bringing new products and services to market and helping organisations become more creative?Kingdon dissects the ways in which corporations are continually reborn

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As Matt Kingdon argues in The Science ofSerendipity, it’s corporate innovators battlingwithin large, established organisations who are the field’sreal heroes. ISBN13:9781118478103.

Management Science Books. ENG. Number of Pages. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Science of Serendipity: How to Unlock the Promise of Innovation in Large Organisations.

Innovation. The word might make you think of SiliconValley. But innovation isn’t the sole province of start-ups.They didn’t invent it, and they’re not always the onesfrom which we can best learn. 

As Matt Kingdon argues in The Science ofSerendipity,  it’s corporate innovators battlingwithin large, established organisations who are the field’sreal heroes. Tapping into 20 years of experience on the frontlines of innovation—bringing new products and services tomarket and helping organisations become more creative—Kingdondissects the ways in which corporations are continually reborn. Helooks at the anatomy of innovation, asking: How do time-pressedexecutives go about taking risks? How do they prepare tosee—and seize—opportunity? And how do you place humans,with all of their fears and foibles, at the heart of commercialsuccess?

In a conversational, jargon-free style built on apractitioner’s observations and anecdotes, TheScience of Serendipity traces the dilemmas that executivesin a wide variety of firms face. It details the steps taken toovercome the issues and get great ideas across the finishline. If you’re looking for a guide in your fightagainst the corporate machine, this is the business book foryou.

Matt Kingdon is the Co-founder, Chairman, andChief Enthusiast of What If! Innovation Partners. For 20years, What If! has partnered with the world’s mostsuccessful, forward-looking companies—businesses such asBarclays, Four Seasons, Google,PepsiCo, Pfizer, and Virgin—to galvaniseinnovation and deliver impact. Its 250 inventors work acrossthe Americas, Europe, and Asia.

Comments (7)

Togar
As a consultant I am always craving to hear about other consultant's journeys and stories. This book is a collection of examples, stories and ideas about approaching innovation in large companies. I appreciate the ease-of-reading and easy to understand examples. Every time I picked up the book I felt inspired and buzzing with new ideas. I also felt inspired to push myself to take more risks and be bigger and bolder. I will likely read this book again, for boost of inspiration. The book is personal, professional and clear. I highly recommend this to any other consultants, business leaders or entrepreneurs.
Felhalar
At the start of each section Mr. Kingdon has a section - if I only had 30 seconds this is what I'd say. They are great summaries. I almost decided to tear them out for reference. The information in the book is solid the reason I only did four stars was that most of the stories were from the UK. They just didn't resonate with me as we'll as companies doing business here.
*Nameless*
I'm in awe of people and companies that have track record of innovation (not one off innovations but that innovate again and again). This may be easier for small companies or penniless entrepreneurs. If they don't innovate they might die (necessity is still the mother of most inventions). It's much hard for larger companies to do so and to do so systematically. This is without a doubt the best and most practical guide I've read on how to create and sustain a true culture of innovation that with practice stands to increase the quantity and quality of innovations in any organization.
Preve
I was expecting a book about innovation for smaller organizations even start up. The book is 100 % directed for big orgs with innovation handling issues. So you know some? Who doesn't?
Darkshaper
I read a lot of business books. Disappointing claptrap from start to finish. Was looking forward to it as written by someone from a consultancy company. Really quite poor, structure poor, clarity poor. Just not a very enlightening book.
Love my kindle spend 800 a year on books. Save your money go elsewhere. Had to go to a lot of trouble to find how to write this review. Probably shows you why I am giving it one star.
Malien
Turbulence
“The storms of creative destruction are blowing us to a better place”. This is a quote directly from “Megachange, the world in 2050”. If you watch the technology trends, there is no question about it. Big data, the internet of things, social media, genetics, biology, quantum computing are all big waves. In that context, innovation and future proofing your business, become more and more important.

innovation as the key challenge
99% of our clients are now struggling with innovation as their key challenge. Companies need to become asymmetric. They need to embrace the unexpected. They need to be able to cope with chaos, hyper-competition, uncertainty and change. They need to embrace ambiguity, disruptions and turbulence. They need to rehearse the future and serendipity is a big part of the scenarios. Optimisation is a given, not a distinctive feature any more. What set the standards in one market, sets the standard for all. Innovation and opportunity spotting will give you the edge.

Explosive mix
We have read many (MANY!) books on innovation. My favourite are “Business model innovation factory” , “Makers” and “Digital disruption”. Mix it with some books on future trends (like Megachange) and you have an explosive mix of big bang disruption and innovation.

Serendipity
Serendipity is interesting. There are not that many books on that subject. Surprisingly so. In commodity hell, happy accidents will become more and more important as early warning signals for a potential opportunity.

The science of serendipity
“The science of serendipity, how to unlock the promise of innovation” by Matt Kingston, talks about serendipity as the raw material for innovation. In fact, the books is not about serendipity at all, it is about successful innovation.

Serendipity is hard work
Matt Kingston argues that happy accidents is hard earned. You need to create the connections, collisions, stimulus and “fill your mental filing cabinet” to create the connection, the serendipity and the innovation. Serendipity is an application of connections, not a random process. He makes the point that serendipity is not creativity. Creativity is futile, it is about commercial launch of an idea.

Innovation is a contact sport
In his view innovation is a contact sport (putting a baby in the boxing ring). Innovation is extremely social. It is people sparking of people. Innovation is tough, particularly in big organisations.

KISS
Innovation therefore needs to be humanised and taken away from complex business terminology. It needs a goal people can identify with (“putting a dent in the universe', Steve Jobs). A rally cry if you want. And it needs a deep, deep understanding of the customer. Posh Spice wanted to be as famous as Persil Automatic. Kennedy wanted a man on the moon. It needs to be expressed in everyday, blunt language.and needs to appeal to basic human instincts.

Game of two halves
It is a game of two halves. Colliding with as much stimulus as possible, then seize on the connections and do something with it. Not creativity. Active serendipity and innovation.

The ideal innovator
The ideal innovator according to Matt is intuitive, agile, ambitious, with a small ego, able to make your own decisions. Nor afraid to leave the company. Values diversity. Collaborator (as in distinct from team worker, collaboration is more robust). The master plumber of the organisation. External facing. Has audacity. Has passion. Has ability to listen. Can go expansive as well as reductive. Goes with guts. Is capable of finishing things off. Note that creative is not mentioned.

Lenses of provocation
Innovation is fuelled by new insight. To create that insight you need lenses of provocation as the raw material for serendipity and innovation. Which means you need to bust the silos and go to the margins. Meet the angry, the ambivalent, the rejecters, the do-it-yourselfers. Find extreme and eccentric users.

Prepare you mind
Other ways to prepare your mind:
• Imagine if you were addressing a five year old.
• What if you break all the rules in your industry?
• What does nature tell you? (The bullet train is based on Kingfishers)
• What do related worlds tell you? (BP invigorate is based on insights from a herbal doctor)
• Surf the net
• Map the flow of can and profit across the value chain (read “The wide lens”)
• Use value maps
• Randomise tools on your smart phone
• Role play customers (good for breaking down cynical executives)
• Walk in the customers shoes
• Look for the contradiction

Make it real
And then you have to make the ideas real. Create the right environment (both physical and mental), give it focus with a limited scope and with constraints, create a sense of urgency and intensity, get a good ringmaster and get some handpicked customers.
Develop prototypes, Ask the questions (who, how, when, what, whom, where). Start co-creating with your customers. Use different media. Experiment. Start fast and start quickly. And keep it low cost so you can keep experimenting. Go radical. Explore alternatives. Key question; “What would MacGuyer do?”

Getting innovation accepted in the organisation
The book looses momentum at the end, when it starts talking about how to get the organisation to accept the new ideas. Although we know form bitter experience how important it is. Here are his tips:
• Get contact with the the enemy as quick as possible. Good enough is good enough
• Make sure the prototype is not too finished. Something that is too polished does not invite comment. Commenting makes people part of the innovation.
• Operate in stealth mode.
• Watch the energy management of the the group. There are lots of ups and down. If members of group get dishearten or even disruptive it could kill the project. No festering. Open communication. Avoid the innovation doom loop
• Don’t underestimate the physical environment. Make all ideas visible (so they are not hidden on a hard drive). Create collisions (office design, farmhouse kitchen, watering holes, creative ninjas). Keep it light.
• It will need leadership involvement and buy in from the top. This included getting a very careful framing (why, how) of the challenge. The organisation needs to know why it is important and what is in and out of scope.
• Keep the teams small (pizza teams) and focus on collaboration rather then team.
• Narrative is everything. Frame the story. Create the symbols and use the grapevine to percolate your messaging.
• Let a 1000 flowers bloom (or kiss a lot of frogs)
• Make metrics meaningful. Focus on “how much to find out if it works” vs “how much will we make”. “Digital disruption” uses the metric ROD (return on disruption).
• Introduce business leaders to consumers. Makes them realise how far removed they are from the real world. Great to kill off the cynics.
• Celebrate all the successes and build pockets of optimism.

Cracking book
Serendipity (as a search term and as part of my research in asymmetric management) got me to this book. I am glad it die. It is a cracking book that makes innovation real. Not many books on innovation do that.
Saberdragon
Matt is one of the great experts on innovation, and his book reads like a traveller's guide written by an author who has not only been there, but knows the best bars. He's distilled over 20 years of experience into a readable, practical and entertaining tour of what it takes to innovate in business today. Having spent a few years innovating in large companies myself, it's the book I wish someone had given me at the start.

The strength of this book is its practicality. Matt explains how to innovate by drawing on real world examples from companies large and small, and the book is crammed full of case studies and anecdotes, describing what works and what doesn't, and providing tips, ideas, stimulus and inspiration. Given this, the title is actually a bit of a misnomer, since one thing Matt doesn't do is set out a "scientific theory" of innovation, and the book is (intentionally I suspect) light on models and analysis. So if this is a science book at all, it's not one designed for those studying innovation, but for those who are out in the field actively experimenting.

But actually I don't think it's a science book. I think it's a travel guide, and an immensely readable and useful one at that. If you're going on any kind of innovation journey, you should take it with you.

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