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by Iain McLean

  • ISBN: 0631138390
  • Author: Iain McLean
  • ePub ver: 1361 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1361 kb
  • Rating: 4.2 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 232
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; 1 edition (January 8, 1991)
  • Formats: lit docx azw lrf
  • Category: Money
  • Subcategory: Economics
epub Public Choice: An Introduction download

McLean examines the workings of public choice from tworelated perspectives - collective action and the aggregation .

McLean examines the workings of public choice from tworelated perspectives - collective action and the aggregation ofindividual preferences into social consensus. The book highlights the paradox at the heart of collectiveaction- that self-interest in the public domain is ductive. National defense and clean air are things we allbenefit from - they are public goods - but we tend to resistcontributing to them.

from book Readings in Public Choice and Constitutional Political . Public Choice: An Introduction. Chapter · January 2008 with 6,314 Reads.

from book Readings in Public Choice and Constitutional Political Economy (p. 1-46). How we measure 'reads'. Public Choice has been defined as the application of the methodology of economics to the study of politics.

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This book offers students of politics and sociology a non-technical explanation of public choice in theory and practice, examining its intellectual roots in games theory, cooperation and collective choice

This book offers students of politics and sociology a non-technical explanation of public choice in theory and practice, examining its intellectual roots in games theory, cooperation and collective choice. As groups of people will not always voluntarily cooperate to achieve valued goals, some form of government is necessary to provide such benefits as defence or clean air. But the provision of government is itself a public good.

By Iain McLean (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987.

Public Choice: An Introduction. ISBN: 978-0-631-13839-6 January 1991 Wiley-Blackwell 232 Pages. The book highlights the paradox at the heart of collective action- that self-interest in the public domain is frequently counterproductive

Public Choice: An Introduction. The book highlights the paradox at the heart of collective action- that self-interest in the public domain is frequently counterproductive. National defense and clean air are things we all benefit from - they are public goods - but we tend to resist contributing to them. The first part of this book examines how government choice in such areas is shaped, and by whom- political entrepreneurs, bureaucrats, interest groups and ordinary citizens. Iain McLean, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987. for the whole of 2019. Rent this article via DeepDyve.

Iain McLean is official fellow in Politics at Nuffield College, Oxford, and Professor of Politics at the University of Oxford. He has held visiting appointments at Stanford and Yale. His books include Public Choice (1987) and Rational Choice and British Politics (2001).

The 1968 Nobel Prize for Economics was awarded to one of thefounders of public choice theory, James Buchanan, yet many peoplehave only the vaguest idea what public choice is. The book offersand unusually clear and accessible introduction to an importantsubject. McLean examines the workings of public choice from tworelated perspectives - collective action and the aggregation ofindividual preferences into social consensus.The book highlights the paradox at the heart of collective action-that self-interest in the public domain is frequentlycounterproductive. National defense and clean air are things we allbenefit from - they are public goods - but we tend to resistcontributing to them. The first part of this book examines howgovernment choice in such areas is shaped, and by whom- politicalentrepreneurs, bureaucrats, interest groups and ordinary citizens.McLean uses the idea of a public market in which politicians sellwhat they hope voters will buy, and further considers how and whenpeople (and animals) co-operate to produce public goods evenwithout government coercion. In the second part of the book theauthor examines the consequences of combining individualpreferences, arguing that there is no straightforward way of addingthem up to form a 'social ordering' and assesing the implicationsof this both for electoral reform and for the status of 'the willof the people'.

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