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by Robert S. McElvaine

  • ISBN: 1439506698
  • Author: Robert S. McElvaine
  • ePub ver: 1321 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1321 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Formats: lit lrf mobi azw
  • Category: Money
  • Subcategory: Economics
epub The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941 download

The Great Depression: America, 1929–1941 (. ISBN 978-0-8129-2327-8) is a 1984 history of the Great Depression by acclaimed historian Robert S. McElvaine.

The Great Depression: America, 1929–1941 (. In this interpretive history, McElvaine discusses the causes and the results of the worst depression in American history, covering the time from 1929 to 1941

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Having just read "The Forgotten Man" by Amity Shlaes, and "The Great Depression" by Robert McElvaine, back-to-back, I have the opportunity to compare how both authors treat this complex topic. What struck me is that Shlaes' approach seems to be "top-down" while McElvaine's approach is "bottom-up". Both books are required reading for the student who wishes to understand how America changed from the Roaring Twenties to the Great Depression. 20 people found this helpful.

The Great Depression book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Great Depression: America 1929-1941 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. One of the classic studies of the Great Depression, featuring.

McElvaine's latest book, Grand Theft Jesus: The Hijacking of Religion in America (Crown, 2008) is described by the publisher as "a passionate and often hilarious wake-up call to Christians to reject the 'Right Reverends' who have stolen Jesus from Christianity and replaced His true message with 'ChristianityLite,' an easy, feel-good scheme that promises salvation without sacrifice.

He is the author of ten books and served as historical consultant for the PBS series The Great Depression

He is the author of ten books and served as historical consultant for the PBS series The Great Depression. His writing appears frequently in such publications as the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and The Wall Street Journal, and he blogs on the Huffington Post.

Электронная книга "The Great Depression: America 1929-1941", Robert S. He is the author of ten books and served as historical consultant for the PBS series The Great Depression. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Great Depression: America 1929-1941" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Praise for Robert S. McElvaine’s The Great Depression . Fair-minded, incisive, thoroughly informed, and eminently readable, The . McElvaine’s book celebrates the power of people to direct economic and political change. Newsday . McElvaine’s passion enhances his work.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. McElvaine’s reflections on the Great Depression re-create one of the most dramatic and traumatic times in the history of our country.

Historical currents and the Great Depression - Who was roaring in the . years of the Depression, 1939-41 - Perspective: the Great Depression and modern America.

Historical currents and the Great Depression - Who was roaring in the twenties?: origins of the Great Depression - In the right place at the wrong time?: Herbert Hoover - Nature takes its course: the first years of the Depression - The lord of the manor: FDR - "And what was dead was hope": 1932 and the interregnum - "Action, and action now": the hundred days and beyond - "Fear itself": Depression life - Moral economics: American values and culture in the Great Depression.

Robert S. McElvaine (born in 1947) is a professor at Millsaps College in Mississippi. He's enjoyed a wildly successful and lengthy career as a historian, specializing in the Great Depression. In fact he is one of hte world's leading experts upon that period of . He has written two massive books upon the subject: The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941 and Down and out in the Great Depression: Letters from the "Forgotten Ma. He's also made over 70 public appearances as an expert in his field

A perennial backlist performer.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Comments (7)

Ueledavi
So disappointed with this book. It stayed on my Kindle while I read 5 other books and I was really looking forward to reading this. It is supposed to be one of the better books about the depression and is highly praised.

McElvaine exhibits such slanted bias, that I put the book down after reading the lengthy introduction and half of the first chapter. I rarely do that. I usually stick with a book because I'll have an interest in the subject. I was beginning to believe that the book was more about bashing conservatives and Reagan, than the depression. I decided that I probably wasn't going to learn as much about the people and their challenges during this time, more strictly economics.

I really hate that I spent money on this book instead of choosing a different history book on my Wish List.

I would've chosen 0 stars if I had that option.
Ziena
Having just read "The Forgotten Man" by Amity Shlaes, and "The Great Depression" by Robert McElvaine, back-to-back, I have the opportunity to compare how both authors treat this complex topic.

What struck me is that Shlaes' approach seems to be "top-down" while McElvaine's approach is "bottom-up". McElvaine sprinkles into his text the correspondence from ordinary Americans to the Roosevelts; the language is rich, heartfelt, evocative, and infuses the text with a deep sense of melancholy. Shlaes focuses more on the major players, people in a position of power, thought leaders.

Both authors approach the topic of the New Deal from diametric economic and political camps. McElvaine's commentary is definitely biased toward a liberal belief in government. His swipes at President Reagan may seem anachronistic (I believe the book was published in the early eighties, and then re-published in the early nineties) so Reagan-bashing may have been more au courant at the time, but now it seems like cheap jabs. Fortunately, these remarks are not too distracting.

Shlaes makes a strong case that the New Deal was concident to the easing of the economic downturn, while McElvaine plays both sides - he attributes the New Deal as "saving capitalism" but as having little influence on ending the Depression.

Both books emphasize the experimental nature of FDR's attempts at righting the economy, and ascribe much of the direction of the New Deal to political rather than economic forces. Both books are required reading for the student who wishes to understand how America changed from the Roaring Twenties to the Great Depression.
Saimath
Writing this in January 2014 and I wish everyone, but particularly those on Wall Street and at the Fed, would read this. Just read chapter 2, Origins, pages 38 to 41 if you don't have time for more. We are here all over again. I had to look at the preface to see when this was written! A different series of events has led again to the same scenario. Great advances in production capability (this time computers, overseas factories), workers pay not keeping up, spending ability of the masses shrinking while the 0.1% grows. He explains why the extravagant spending of the millionaires was not enough to keep the whole economy going. One-sided foreign movement of goods (then exports, now imports) causing global inequalities in money flow. The downturn in Europe (sound familiar?). Together with the fact of psychological cycles in the population, and how group views swing from the liberal to conservative, just like business cycles over 10-20 periods. Nothing we can really do about it, but this book makes it obvious the picture is much bigger than can be addressed by QE. We appear to be right now facing the diminishing of confidence in the market, and in the end that's all that will matter. If the next Depression is imminently upon us, it's all predicted in this book. Not that I think we could really stop this whole cycle, but it's interesting to understand what's happening in the big picture. I recommend this book highly.
Dianaghma
The book is a long and tedious read, but there are many interesting historical overviews regarding the Great Depression. I used the book to help by granddaughter write a research paper for college.

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