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by Stephen Haven

  • ISBN: 0815609280
  • Author: Stephen Haven
  • ePub ver: 1785 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1785 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 175
  • Publisher: Syracuse University Press; First Edition edition (April 17, 2008)
  • Formats: doc azw lrf lit
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Memoirs
epub The River Lock: One Boy’s Life along the Mohawk download

A true bildungsroman, The River Lock traces the forging of Haven's identity from the clash of the two worlds of his youth-home and street.

A true bildungsroman, The River Lock traces the forging of Haven's identity from the clash of the two worlds of his youth-home and street. His return to his childhood past allows Haven to understand and describe how his growing understanding of art, culture, spirituality, and class melded to create a man able to live fully in two distinct worlds, the foundation of the man he is today. Syracuse University Press.

Traces the forging of the author's identity from the clash of his youthful home life and the streets of his native mill town. This memoir reveals how a growing understanding of art, culture, friendship, spirituality, family, and class melded to create a man able to live fully in two distinct worlds.

I have also published a memoir, The River Lock: One Boy's Life along the Mohawk (Syracuse University Press, 2008), and a chapbook of collaborative translations from contemporary Chinese poetry, The Enemy in Defensive Positions (with Wang Shouyi and Jin Zhong, Poetry Miscellany Chapbooks, 2008).

Pulled between the disparate spheres of home life with a minister father he loves and respects, and the world of sex, drugs, and violence of his closest boyhood friends, author Stephen Haven relates his journey of self-discovery in this poignant memoir.

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The River Lock: One Boy’s Life Along the Mohawk. The River Lock: One Boy’s Life Along the Mohawk by Dr. Stephen H. Haven (Steve) '79 View author page View alumni profile Syracuse University Press; 2008; 175 pp. Genre: Non-fiction Category: Memoir Additional Information - Library Catalog. Amherst College 220 South Pleasant Street Amherst, MA 01002.

one boy's life along the Mohawk. 1st ed. by Stephen Haven. Mohawk River Valley (. Published 2008 by Syracuse University Press in Syracuse, . Biography, Childhood and youth.

Drums Along the Mohawk is a 1939 American historical drama film based upon a 1936 novel of the same name by American author Walter D. Edmonds. The film was produced by Darryl F. Zanuck and directed by John Ford. Henry Fonda and Claudette Colbert portray settlers on the New York frontier during the American Revolution. The couple suffer British, Tory, and Indian attacks on their farm before the Revolution ends and peace is restored.

Stephen Haven has published three collections of poetry, The Last Sacred Place in North America . Program in Poetry and Creative Nonfiction, he is also author of the memoir The River Lock: One Boy's Life Along the Mohawk.

Stephen Haven has published three collections of poetry, The Last Sacred Place in North America (New American Press, 2012), Dust and Bread(Turning Point, 2008), and The Long Silence of the Mohawk Carpet Smokestacks(University of New Mexico/West End Press, 2004). Director of the Ashland University MFA Program in Poetry and Creative Nonfiction, he is also author of the memoir The River Lock: One Boy's Life Along the Mohawk. Fu Han at the Nuts Café, Chongqing, China, April 9, 2011. By Stephen Haven February 15, 2012. Whatever song they’re singing, It’s not Tiananmen.

Pulled between the disparate spheres of homelife withhis minister father and the world of sex, drugs, and violenceof his closest friends, author Stephen Havenrelates his journey of self-discovery in this poignantmemoir. After a fourteen-year absence from his homein Amsterdam, New York, Haven returns to the streetsthat molded his character. Through memories of hisadolescence, Haven relives his youth in this economicallydeprived community and explores the values offriendship, loyalty, and privilege.A true bildungsroman, The River Lock traces the forgingof Haven's identity from the clash of the two worldsof his youth-home and street. His return to his childhoodpast allows Haven to understand and describe how hisgrowing understanding of art, culture, spirituality, andclass melded to create a man able to live fully in twodistinct worlds, the foundation of the man he is today.
Comments (7)

Nalmergas
There are certain things that only other former Amsterdamians can understand. I truly enjoyed this book, and understood where he was going with it from the beginning.

In the beginning of the book, he talks about staying in the Best Western, that had formally been the Holiday Inn. This is the nicest hotel in town, though no longer a Best Western, it is where I stayed during a visit last year. As sad and sick as it may be, our hotel room bed still had a Holiday Inn tag on it(after a dozen or so years, and two changes of ownership). This was something I found to be "so Amsterdam". Things in that my look different on the surface, but under it all, it's still the same.

I found this book to be an easy read, and read it in it's entirety last evening. The book is well written, and Mr. Haven creates a clear picture to the life he lead while living in a town of limited possibilities.
Arcanescar
A piercing look into the life of a young man who grew up to become a wonderful poet. Perhaps because I too spend a good many years in upstate New York, I found this memoir not only a captivatingly honest read, but a rare opportunity to glimpse the inspiration for his art.
Rleyistr
Its a very difficult book to read. It doesn't have any flow to the story. I think he did an injustice to the city of Amsterdam. Having lived in Amsterdam growing up in the same timeframe, it was a very different environment and a very good place to live. I was disappointed that i bought the book. If I knew the contents of the book, i would never had bought it.
Jogrnd
Richard Russo nailed life in an Upstate New York milltown; but Stephen Haven does a nice job as well depicting life in a once prosperous factory town now waning and in decline. Russo who grew up a few miles Northwest in Johnstown, NY of Stephen Haven is a Social Phylosopher. Haven is a poet. What remains to bolster the chances for the Cities' Youth of realizing a productive adult life is the above average school system in Amsterdam, NY still available and still vital. Escape is the answer for the Town's youth, and only equipped with an excellent secondary education, along with experiences of growing up in a multi-ethnic milltown give departing youth the opportunity to compete. Haven lends poetry to the simple life of dealing with adolescent hormones.
Manris
As having grown up in Amsterdam at the time when Stephen did, as well as being an active member in his father's church, as my whole family was, and playing basketball with Stephen on the church team, considering all of that, I must say that I enjoyed reading his memoir of that time. And, saying all of that, I must add that I didn't know Stephen very well, but I knew he was someone special, and with great ability. I'm glad that he's doing well and writing.

I rate this book as being mediocre because I expected a bit more of Stephen about the city. Along the lines of Jim Carroll's Basketball Diaries its just not as good in the story telling aspect of Stephen's experiences. It is an honest and bold representation of the Haven Family and Stephen's life, as it was. I had hoped for more.

Also, not to tear it apart too much because I know Stephen's heart was in this project, you can feel it in the book, but to further explain my rating, the reiteration of events was a bit much. As a reader, and a poor reader at that, I felt that he repeated himself in the exact same manner many times in the book.

I expect to read more of Stephen's work in the future and I have hope that he'll improve. I hope to read about the Mohawk Valley in a way that will take me back to the place we both grew up in a way that is original and makes me think of Amsterdam in a new way I hadn't before.

Best wishes Stephen!
Nagis
Stephen Haven's memoir, The River Lock, is an introspective telling of the trials, tribulations and warm hearted escapades of an adolescent coming of age in upstate New York. Stephen's father is a respected rector at a local parish; Stephen's youthful indiscretions often conflict with this pious background and a somewhat laissez faire upbringing. There are a number of amusing childish pranks. There is also an element of danger as Stephen tends to wander between two distinct circles of friends and comes in contact with elements of alcohol, drugs and violence. There are many forks in the road.

This is a story about childhood and about growing up. It is a story about the choices that we make and the forces that shape our lives and remain with us. It is a fond reminiscence to which most can relate. Stephen Haven writes with a sense of humor and a sense of place that make this a novel that will stay with you. Highly recommended!
Delirium
I couldn't wait to get a copy of this book and read it. I had read some of Haven's poetry, and it is great. I read River Lock in one sitting and plan to read it again, so that I can review it in more detail elsewhere.

I'm not sure Haven ever knew where he was heading with this book. The book seems purposeless and almost pointless. The endless telling of adolescent tomfoolery wore thin rather quickly. Frankly, I am tired of stories of people's first sexual experience, first period, first time drunk, etc. It's not that these experiences shouldn't be written about, but it takes an exceptional writer to write about them in a way that's interesting and meaningful. These stories are so common now, they have become cliches.

The book has better moments like the chapter titled PK. Occasionally, Haven's poetic skills break through and there are sentences and paragraphs that are like pearls in pig muck. At times, however, Haven's writing borders on cruelty. This is particularly true when writing about the little Tucci girl's sexual activity. It's not that writing about sex is bad, but disclosing such information about a girl, when everyone in Amsterdam, New York knows who she is, is not great writing. It's simply bad taste.

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