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by Roman Frister

  • ISBN: 0802137628
  • Author: Roman Frister
  • ePub ver: 1450 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1450 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 384
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reprint edition (March 30, 2001)
  • Formats: lrf mobi doc txt
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub The Cap: The Price of a Life download

Uncompromisingly frank and unsparing, The Cap is an unconventional Holocaust memoir that defies all moral judgment and ventures into the darkest terrain imaginable: that of a soul blackened by the unforgiving cruelty of its surroundings. com User, January 12, 2008. With one obvious exception, Frister shows an excellent grasp of factual events.

Uncompromisingly frank and unsparing, The Cap is an unconventional Holocaust memoir that defies all moral judgment and ventures into the darkest terrain imaginable: that of a. .Place of Publication.

Uncompromisingly frank and unsparing, The Cap is an unconventional Holocaust memoir that defies all moral judgment and ventures into the darkest terrain imaginable: that of a soul blackened by the unforgiving cruelty of its surroundings.

A Polish survivor’s brutal and beautifully written Holocaust memoir.

The only heroes in this book are those who were there when Roman needed their help

The only heroes in this book are those who were there when Roman needed their help. Although this point is not pressed, it is very clear that he forgot none of them, and did his best to help them, especially after the war, when he could. For Poles too this is uncomfortable reading. Poles need to read this as it is by a man who once thought of himself as a patriotic Pole AND a Jew. His Polish friends though saw him as a Jew first and foremost.

Roman Frister's memoir of his life before, during, and after his imprisonment in the Nazi concentration camps . Chilling and unsentimental, The Cap is a rare and unadorned self-portrait of a man willing to show all of his scars

Roman Frister's memoir of his life before, during, and after his imprisonment in the Nazi concentration camps sparked enormous controversy and became an international best-seller. With bone-chilling candor, Frister illustrates how the impulse to live unhinges our comfortable notions of morality, blurring the boundary between victim and oppressor and leaving absolutely no room for martyrdom. Chilling and unsentimental, The Cap is a rare and unadorned self-portrait of a man willing to show all of his scars. Reflected in stark relief are the indelible wounds of all twentieth-century European Jews.

The war was over when Roman Frister heard those words, from his father-in-law, but he had already learnt part of their truth in labour and concentration camps. In the incident which gives his memoir its title, he had taken another prisoner's cap to replace his own, knowing that anyone bare-headed at roll-call would be shot. The absence of his own cap was not a matter of carelessness. A paedophile called Arpad Basci.

Young Roman watches a German officer kill his mother with a single blow, then is forced to lie on her cooling corpse; at 15.

Young Roman watches a German officer kill his mother with a single blow, then is forced to lie on her cooling corpse; at 15, he sits by his dying father's bed, thinking only of the half-loaf of bread underneath it: "I was afraid it might crumble before he stopped breathing. Yet readers will sense the author is not unfeeling, but rather in a state of profound moral shock that endures to scar his adult existence.

Uncompromisingly frank, "both brutal and beautifully written" (The Boston Globe), The Cap is an unconventional Holocaust memoir that defies all moral judgment and ventures into a soul blackened by the unforgiving cruelty of its surroundings. Roman Frister's memoir of his life before, during, and after his imprisonment in the Nazi concentration camps sparked enormous controversy and became an international best-seller. With bone-chilling candor, Frister illustrates how the impulse to live unhinges our comfortable notions of morality, blurring the boundary between victim and oppressor and leaving absolutely no room for martyrdom. By the time Roman Frister was sixteen, he had watched his mother murdered by an SS officer and he had waited for his father to expire, eager to retrieve a hidden half loaf of bread from beneath the dying man's cot. When confronted with certain death, he placed another inmate in harm's way to save himself. Frister's resilience and instinct for self-preservation -- developed in the camps -- become the source of his life's successes and failures. Chilling and unsentimental, The Cap is a rare and unadorned self-portrait of a man willing to show all of his scars. Reflected in stark relief are the indelible wounds of all twentieth-century European Jews. An exceptional and groundbreaking testimony, Roman Frister's "gut-wrenching memoir is a must-read." -- Kirkus Reviews
Comments (7)

Prorahun
The Cap: The Price of a Life, forced me to read it like being unable to look away from a horrible accident.
I did not "enjoy" this book, but glad I finished it.
Vivaral
deep and moving.
JUST DO IT
I MET MR. FRISTER SO THE BOOK HAD A SPECIAL MEANING TO ME. I WISH HIS BOOK WOULD HAVE BEEN MORE ABOUT HIS TIME IN THE CAMPS RATHER THAN HIS AFTER LIFE.
Conjukus
It's one of the best books that I have read lately. It's brutally honest and vividly illustrates how far people will go in order to survive. It also serves as a cautionary tale of what happens when we let hatred and bigotry run amok.
Nafyn
not convincing enough
Quttaro
The Cap is one of the best Holocaust works I have ever read. I have studied this period in history and the Jewish history too for more than 2 decades. Not starting at the beginning, but putting the reader smack in the middle of things immediately, and then using flashbacks and forward thoughts as one would remember their own story, was a riveting core of this book.

This book would make an unforgettable movie along the lines of Schindler's List, but from a teen's Jewish perspective. That Roman wrote this in Hebrew originally is chilling too, knowing he spared not his race, and yet it was also recently translated into English for the world stage.

He did not spare his thoughts. His story is candid, raw, open, and honest, logical, and clean, and Roman remains brilliant through it, warts and all. I applaud his ingenuity at staying alive and also for the insanely funny yet terrifying way he tried to save his grandparents. I do not know if I could have ever been that strong or that logical in the face of such terror. I applaud Roman. Thank you, Roman, for sharing what must have been hard to regurgitate in such a measured, brilliant manner.
fr0mTheSkY
This has got to be one of the most peculiar memoirs I've ever read, Holocaust or otherwise. I have never seen a person so baldly portray themselves in such an unflattering light. The author admits to being selfish, narcissistic, corrupt, chronically dishonest (but at least he's honest about his dishonesty), a womanizer, a deadbeat father and husband, and even a cold-blooded murderer (after a fashion). Yet I could not dislike him. I too much admired his uncluttered honesty.

This book is not necessarily any more graphic than other Holocaust memoirs, but the author's admissions are shocking, even to me. It also jumps around in time quite a bit, sometimes advancing or retreating decades between one paragraph and another. I wasn't annoyed by this, but I admit sometimes it was hard to keep track of things.

I would recommend this book but only with reservations.
This book is a great insight into how the horrific events of the holocaust affected one man's life. Readers can better relate to just how terrible the holocaust was. The personal aspects of the book added a touching angle that reached out to readers. It also painted a picture of before and after the war too.
The book was confusing at times because of the way it jumped around from one time period to another. However, it contained interesting and shocking stories from Frister's life. the book details his youth in Silesia and then his experiences in Nazi concentration camps. It also follows his life after the end of the war when he becomes a journalist in Poland and then emigrates to Israel. The Cap really showed how the holocaust changed the author. While he was not void of emotions, he became a hardened man due to the traumatic events he lived through.While his writing style left some to be desired, the content was very detailed, informational, and intriguing.

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