» » Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling

epub Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling download

by Charles Allen

  • ISBN: 1605980315
  • Author: Charles Allen
  • ePub ver: 1516 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1516 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 426
  • Publisher: Pegasus Books; 1St Edition edition (March 8, 2009)
  • Formats: lit mbr rtf doc
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling download

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865 and spent his early years there, before being sent, aged six, to England, a desperately unhappy experience

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865 and spent his early years there, before being sent, aged six, to England, a desperately unhappy experience. Charles Allen's great-grandfather brought the sixteen-year-old Kipling out to Lahore to work on The Civil and Military Gazette with the words 'Kipling will do', and thus set young Rudyard on his literary course. And so it was that at the start of the cold weather of 1882 he stepped ashore at Bombay on 18 October 1882 - 'a prince entering his kingdom'.

A brilliantly insightful biographical study. Allen is equally sound on all important aspects of Kipling  . Select Format: Hardcover.

The strength of Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling comes from Charles Allen's deep knowledge of British Indian society, which he demonstrated in his previous book, Plain Tales from the Raj, and his ability to describe Kipling's place in it (The Age)

The strength of Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling comes from Charles Allen's deep knowledge of British Indian society, which he demonstrated in his previous book, Plain Tales from the Raj, and his ability to describe Kipling's place in it (The Age). Kipling Sahib is a revealing study of a much maligned and fascinating man who was much more than a mere propagandist for the Empire (Sydney Morning Herald). Allen tells his complex story with concision, insight and wide-ranging vision (SUNDAY TIMES). A fascinating new book (SPECTATOR).

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission: a free online library for everyone. This is our day. Today

Allen's Kipling is certainly engaging - complex, truculent, rash and frank to the point of social suicide - and his scrapes with pukka hill-station society, his dangerous intimacy with the low-life of Lahore and his bouts of mental illness are deftly told.

Allen's Kipling is certainly engaging - complex, truculent, rash and frank to the point of social suicide - and his scrapes with pukka hill-station society, his dangerous intimacy with the low-life of Lahore and his bouts of mental illness are deftly told.

Charles Allen (born 1940) is a British freelance writer and popular historian who lives in London Works.

Charles Allen (born 1940) is a British freelance writer and popular historian who lives in London. His British parents were both born in India and his numerous works focus on the British Raj. Contents. Plain Tales from the Raj: Images of British India in the Twentieth Century. RAJ: A Scrapbook of British India 1877-1947. Tales from the Dark Continent: Images of British Colonial Africa in the Twentieth Century.

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd/ RUD-yərd; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He was born in India, which inspired much of his work

Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd/ RUD-yərd; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He was born in India, which inspired much of his work. Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888). His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If-" (1910).

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865 and spent his early years there, before being sent, aged six, to. .Charles Allen is the author of a number of bestselling books about Indian and the colonial experience elsewhere.

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865 and spent his early years there, before being sent, aged six, to England, a desperately unhappy experience. A traveller, historian and master storyteller he is one of the great chroniclers of India.

The first biography of Kipling's younger years: his Indian childhood, abandonment in England, and coming of age as a writer.

Rudyard Kipling was born in Bombay in 1865 and spent his early years there, before being sent to England at the age of six, where he was desperately unhappy. Charles Allen's great-grandfather brought the sixteen-year-old Kipling back to India to work on The Civil and Military Gazette, and thus began young Rudyard's literary career. He arrived in Bombay on October 18, 1882―"a prince entering his kingdom"―and for the next seven years, his writing established him as a popular and critical, though sometimes controversial, success. Allen has written a brilliant account of these formative years―as a child in India, his unhappy years in England, and his coming of age back "home" in Bombay. In this tale of family and Empire, Allen traces the Indian experiences of Kipling's parents, Lockwood and Alice, and reveals what kind of culture the young writer was born into and how it would shape his life and writing over the next twenty years.
Comments (7)

Quendant
To see how Kipling came to be the author of books, short stories, and poems about India, this is the book to read. It drags for awhile, as it goes into background details about Kipling's father, Lockwood, and some of the other personages that affected Kipling in some way, but this background goes a long way toward explaining how Rudyard Kipling developed over the years.
It wasn't just that Kipling was born in Bombay, hence was automatically qualified to write about India. Much more than that----his insights developed over time. His basic will to understand India and its people is very important.
How did Kipling come to be the writer that he was? This book delves into that question in quite some detail. Highly recommended.
Uickabrod
I beleive that this book is one of Allen's best. The introduction is personal and yet objective enough to allow the reader to form his or her opinion without a pre- condeived prejudice. The detailed narrative moves along briskley. I think thats what I enjoyed the most was the detail. A good read, especially if you enjoy Kipling's work.
Elildelm
It about Kipling, what else if there to say.
Inertedub
Fact-laden but a bit too dense and dry for my taste.
Buzatus
The author is completely at home with his subject and takes us along with us to the Mysterious East. He makes us understand what living in this place 'Out East' was like during the British Raj and how it influenced Kipling's writing.

Kipling learned to take each man for who he was. He was a man ahead of his time. Sadly this has been forgotten in this politically correct climate.

Rediscover Kipling. I dare you.
Painshade
Received book in pleanty of time for Christmas, son enjoyed receiving it as a gift. It came as promised and quickly. Good transaction.
Zahisan
A fascinating insight to Kipling's background. I had no idea he was such a precocious, bumptious and opinionated young man. How he matured so young! And of course that terrible time in the Southsea foster home. He was also quite a lad, seemingly with all kinds of dalliances, especially in Simla. It all goes to explain how he could write a poem like "The Ladies".

Incredible how he developed such a deep understanding of the East. Breaking convention and wandering the streets of the native cities by night and making all kinds of unconventional acquaintances and soaking up novel experiences. That was the local color so wonderfully exemplified by his novel Kim Kim (Penguin Classics), and his Ballad of East and West.

Kipling also did something that no Sahib had done before: talk to the ordinary Tommy in the barracks and absorb all the terrible privations they suffered. That is how he could write a short story like "The Drums of the Fore and the Aft" in The Man who would be King The Man Who Would Be King and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics) and searing poems like Danny Deever Collected Verse Of Rudyard Kipling.

Charles Allen only sounds one false note when, seemingly as a a sop to the politically correct, he is unnecessarily apologetic about Kipling and his time. Quite uncalled for! Kipling's works display a wonderful understanding and sympathy for humanity in general. How lucky we are to have his works as an insightful record of the British Raj.
This is a terrific book, with everything you might want to know about this period in Kipling's life, well-written and with some good maps (!!!!!). Allen's take on Kipling's outsiderness and complicated imperialism is excellent. The final chapter on Kim is perhaps the best of all (as is Kim itself).

Related to Kipling Sahib: India and the Making of Rudyard Kipling: