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epub Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford (Random House Reader's Circle) download

by Julia Fox

  • ISBN: 034551078X
  • Author: Julia Fox
  • ePub ver: 1755 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1755 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 416
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reprint edition (March 24, 2009)
  • Formats: txt docx lrf lrf
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford (Random House Reader's Circle) download

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with "the infamous Lady Rochford

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. As powerful men and women around her became victims of Henry's ruthless and absolute power, including her own husband and sister-in-law, Queen Anne Boleyn, Jane's allegience to the volatile monarchy was sustained and rewarded. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with "the infamous Lady Rochford. But now historian Julia Fox sets the record straight and restores dignity to this much-maligned figure whose life and reputation were taken from her.

31 That Bawd, the Lady Jane Rochford. EPILOGUE: History Finds a Scapegoat. Appendix: The Likeness of Jane Boleyn. References and Abbreviations. One of the knights who had jousted with the king on that carefree day and who later helped carry the body of the tiny child was Sir Thomas Boleyn, a courtier who was very much in favor with his sovereign. Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth Howard, had two daughters and a son. The girls’ names were Anne and Mary, and their brother was George. When the mourners entered Westminster Abbey on that raw February day, these children were playing with their attendants.

Infamous Lady: The True Story of Countess Erzsebet Bathory. The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn. The True Story of the Bilderberg Group. The True Story Of The Kelly Gang. Infamous Ploesti- The whole true story. Report "Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford".

The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with the infamous Lady Rochford, but now historian Julia Fox sets the record straight

The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford. The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with the infamous Lady Rochford, but now historian Julia Fox sets the record straight.

Julia Fox. If he ventured on to it again, it would be at a time of his own choosing and only after exhaustive enquiries regarding the lucky bride had been undertaken by men he trusted. such things should not be rushed. In the interim, he delighted in his son. The child was strong and happy, cared for by a carefully selected team led by Lady Margaret Bryan, Edward’s lady mistress. The prince was in good health and merry, Lady Bryan wrote to the king in one of her many letters.

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with the infamous Lady Rochford. As powerful men and women around her became victims of Henry’s ruthless and absolute power, including her own husband and sister-in-law, Queen Anne Boleyn, Jane’s allegiance to the volatile monarchy was sustained and rewarded. But the price for her loyalty would eventually be her undoing and the ruination of her name.

Jane Boleyn, Viscountess Rochford née Parker, (c. 1505 – 13 February 1542) was the wife of George Boleyn, 2nd Viscount Rochford, brother of Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII. Jane had been a member of the household of Henry's first wife, Catherine of Aragon. She had a role in the judgements against, and subsequent executions of, her husband and Anne Boleyn

Jane Boleyn, is something of a shadowy figure, so I assumed that this book would bring forth lots of new information and insights into her characterand circumstances.

Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford. Julia Fox. Download (mobi, . 8 Mb). EPUB FB2 PDF TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The house that Jane inherited at Blickling is no longer there. All that remains is one chimney, which has been incorporated into the grand Jacobean mansion that replaced it shortly after James died, but the site, nestling in the gentle Norfolk countryside, is of course the same. It is pretty, but remote, a far cry from the noise and bustle of Henry’s palaces.

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from relative obscurity to the inner circle of King Henry VIII. As powerful men and women around her became victims of Henry’s ruthless and absolute power–including her own husband and her sister-in-law, Queen Anne Boleyn–Jane’s allegiance to the volatile monarch was sustained and rewarded. But the cost of her loyalty would eventually be her undoing and the ruination of her name. For centuries, little beyond rumor and scandal has been associated with “the infamous Lady Rochford,” but now historian Julia Fox sets the record straight. Drawing upon her own deep knowledge and years of original research, she brings us into the inner sanctum of court life, teeming with intrigue and redolent with the threat of disgrace. In the eyes and ears of Jane Boleyn, we witness the myriad players of the stormy Tudor period, and Jane herself emerges as a courageous spirit, a modern woman forced by circumstances to make her own way in a privileged but vicious world.
Comments (7)

komandante
This book is only okay. Frankly, I would have preferred a fictionalized version of Jane Boleyn's life. That way, the author could have inserted her opinions in a way that wouldn't make us question so much. There is simply no way to prove Ms. Fox's version of events. On the other hand, we have hundreds of stories about how nasty Lady Rochford was. I am reminded of all the scholars who were so "certain" Richard III didn't have a crooked back, until the evidence proved that he did. In my view, there a reason so much calumny followed Jane Rochford after her death. She was, at the very least, a gossip and a deceitful servant, and possibly much worse.The biggest problem I had with this book was the author's supposition that Jane repeated a remark about King Henry's sexual prowess that she heard from Anne Boleyn to her husband, Anne's brother. How does she know Anne didn't tell her brother herself? How does she know Jane didn't write a letter condemning her husband and his sister? She doesn't. This book is mostly a recounting of the Tudor tale, the rise and fall of Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Cromwell, etc. Little new ground is covered, but you might pick up a few new facts about the Tudors. It's thoroughly researched, but mostly kind of boring. I gave it three stars mainly because I managed to finish the book. In the end, it didn't convince me that Jane Boleyn was any nicer than I ever thought her to be
Zeli
Telling the story of any woman that lived more than 500 years ago is a challenge. Unless the woman in question was highborn, there is unlikely to be much secondary information about her and unless she wrote letters and the receivers saved them, there's no insight into the woman herself. This is the challenge Julia Fox faces in writing about Jane Parker Boleyn.

The Infamous Lady Rochford was on scene for the beheading of two of Henry VIII's wives. The first, Anne Boleyn, was a natural. Jane was not only Anne's sister-in-law, she was a lady in waiting to Queen Katherine. The second always strike me as simply odd. Who keeps their dead/annulled wife's sister-in-law around to take care of your new wife? Especially when you had her husband executed for sleeping with his sister/your wife? Surely good help wasn't that hard to find in Tudor England.

Fox starts out tentatively, telling Jane's story with liberal use of the words "maybe", "probably", "perhaps," and "we can't be certain." Another writer might have boldly made suppositions and presented them as likely facts. I can't fault Fox for being so scrupulous but it did make those first chapters a tiring read for me. Once Fox has access to primary sources, she's more at ease and Jane's story picks up.

Jane Boleyn remains unknowable through no fault of Fox's. There are few surviving letters from her and her testimony at Catherine Howard's was obviously constrained. Fox makes a convincing case that Jane was simply seduced by the abundant luxury of living close to and being in favor with the King. If he liked you, the perks flowed and you were sleeping in a custom carved bed and drinking from gem-encrusted gold cups. You were also living at the most exciting place in England. The temptation was too much for Jane. Even after seeing the consequences suffered by Anne and George Boleyn. She also convinced me that Jane probably (there's that word again!) did not conspire against or even testify against Anne and George.

Fox is less successful at explaining why Jane helped Catherine commit adultery. That is a hard one to explain even from the lips of the woman herself. And Fox does occasionally try to wring too much from her scant primary sources like when she tries to make a direct connection between the likely charitable endeavors of Jane and Anne and the charitable bequests in the will of Anne's grandfather.

This is an interesting attempt to reclaim a notorious figure from the unsubstantiated stories told against her for centuries. I'm not sure who is the best audience for this book, though. If you're a Tudorphile, like me, you'll find yourself covering a lot of ground you've been over before many times but you will get a fresh perspective on Jane Boleyn. If you're new to the Tudors, will you even care about Jane Boleyn? I'm not sure. If you are interested in the lives in non-royal women in Tudor England, you could do much worse than to read this book.
great ant
There are plenty of more in-depth criticisms, but I'd just like to affirm how disappointing this book was. It reads like a 7th grader's paper on the wives of the Henry VIII, where every few lines the author remembers she's supposed to be writing about Jane Boleyn and throws in a "We have no way of knowing if Jane was there or not, but she probably was," "At this time, Jane might have felt happy/sad/scared," etc. You come away with next to no actual knowledge about Jane herself. If you're reading this, you doubtless already have a pretty solid understanding of Henry's marriages; at best, this is a quick refresher course in them.
Velan
I really enjoyed the first few chapters of this book. The pages flew by and really drew me in. But after a 100 pages of could bes, perhapses and maybes and I was more than ready to put the book down. As a matter of fact I started another book just to get away from the lack of information.

Now, granted that most women in the medieval and Tudor times are considered basically property and no one thought that they were important enough to remember birthdates and other milestones in their lived, but there has to be more imformation than we're getting from Ms. Fox. I'll keep the book and use it as a reference, just because it's more imformation about the Tudor court and the interesting people that populated it. Perhaps in another life there will be a way to get to know this vinditive, evil shrew of a woman.

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