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by Ophelia Field

  • ISBN: 0312314663
  • Author: Ophelia Field
  • ePub ver: 1761 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1761 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 576
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (July 23, 2003)
  • Formats: docx mbr txt azw
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub Sarah Churchill: Duchess of Marlborough: The Queen's Favourite download

At court, Sarah also met her husband, John Churchill, later duke of Marlborough and one of the 18th .

At court, Sarah also met her husband, John Churchill, later duke of Marlborough and one of the 18th century's greatest generals. Sarah exerted great influence, especially after Anne became queen and the duke a national hero. One of the queen's most favored companions for a great number of years, Sarah eventually blackmailed Anne, whom she believed to have unceremoniously dumped her for another female friend. Intriguingly, Sarah threatened to expose Anne as a lesbian, an accusation that would have implicated Sarah in her own attempted slander of the queen.

Start by marking Sarah Churchill Duchess of Marlborough: The Queen's .

Start by marking Sarah Churchill Duchess of Marlborough: The Queen's Favourite as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Field explores the life of Sarah Marlborough in remarkable detail, never shying away from exploring both her flaws and admirable qualities.

An unforgettable portrait of Sarah Churchill, first Duchess of Marlborough (1660-1744), the glamorous and controversial founder of the Spencer-Churchill dynasty that produced both Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Spencer. Tied to Queen Anne by an intimate friendship, Sarah hoped to wield power equal to that of a government minister. When their relationship soured, she blackmailed Anne with letters revealing their intimacy, and accused her of perverting the course of national affairs by keeping lesbian favourites.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 526-540) and index

Includes bibliographical references (pages 526-540) and index. Miss Jennings - 'Flames of extravagant passion' - The cockpit circle - The glass ceiling - 'Driving the nail' - 'Raised from the dust' - 'Noise of the town' - The good hater - Banished - 'A kind of author' - Dowager - A dozen heirs - 'A flight for fame'. This volume is a biography of Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (1660-1744)

Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Princess of Mindelheim, Countess of Nellenburg (née Jenyns, spelled Jennings in most modern references; 5 June 1660 (Old Style) – 18 October 1744), was an English courtier who rose to be one of the most influe.

Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Princess of Mindelheim, Countess of Nellenburg (née Jenyns, spelled Jennings in most modern references; 5 June 1660 (Old Style) – 18 October 1744), was an English courtier who rose to be one of the most influential women of her time through her close friendship with Anne, Queen of Great Britain.

The Queen’s Favourite. Age Range: 1660 - 1744. Field ably follows Sarah through an era of turmoil, with the Whigs hell-bent on preserving a Protestant line of succession and out to scourge Tory Catholics. With Anne’s coronation in 1702, Sarah had the royal ear and used it effectively to advance Whig issues while her husband, embarrassingly, retained Tory tendencies. Then came the famous fall from grace.

Sarah Churchill Duchess of Marlborough : The Queen's Favourite. Sarah Churchill, 1st Duchess of Marlborough gained notoriety through three things:1. She was a friend to Queen Anne of England. She took this position of power for granted, treating the Queen much like a dumb child. She felt it was her right to instruct the Queen on appropriate political decisions and appointments at court.

Ophelia Field's masterly biography brings Sarah Churchill's own voice, passionate and intelligent, back to life. Sarah Churchill Duchess of Marlborough: The Queen's Favourite. Here is an unforgettable portrait of a woman who cared intensely about how we would remember her - perfect for fans interested in the history behind the major motion picture starring Rachel Weisz with Olivia Colman and Emma Stone. The true story of Lady Sarah, who was portrayed by BAFTA Award-winning actress Rachel Weisz in the critically acclaimed film The Favourite.

The Queen decided to allow John Churchill to remain Captain-General of the army but immediately removed Sarah from all her functions. Eventually, John Churchill was no longer needed as the head of the army. Thus, he and his wife lost all their privileges and went traveling through Europe, to countries where he was appreciated for his military career. Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough Bio As PDF. REPORT ERROR. Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough Biography.

The Queen's Favourite. An unforgettable portrait of Sarah Churchill, first Duchess of Marlborough (1660-1744), the glamorous and controversial founder of the Spencer-Churchill dynasty that produced both Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Spencer.

A brilliant new biographer presents an unforgettable portrait of Sarah Churchill, first Duchess of Marlborough (1660-1744), the glamorous and controversial founder of the Spencer-Churchill dynasty that produced both Winston Churchill and Lady Diana Spencer. Tied to Queen Anne by an intimate friendship, Sarah hoped to wield power equal to that of a government minister. When their relationship soured, she blackmailed Anne with letters revealing their intimacy, and accused her of perverting the course of national affairs by keeping lesbian favourites. Her spectacular arguments with the Queen, with the architects and workmen at Blenheim Palace, and with her own family made Sarah famous for her temper. Attacked for traits that might have been applauded in a man, Sarah was also capable of inspiring intense love and loyalty, deeply committed to her principles and to living what she believed to be a virtuous life.Sarah was a compulsive and compelling writer, narrating the major events of her day, with herself often at center stage. This biography brings her own voice, passionate and intelligent, back to life, and casts a critical eye over images of the Duchess handed down through art, history, and literature. Here is an unforgettable portrait of a woman who cared intensely about how we would remember her.
Comments (7)

Steamy Ibis
I really enjoyed this book. I did not think the author jumped around any more than any other biographer telling a complex story about complex people. I thought she did a great job sorting out what various people have said about Sarah, starting with comments made about her in her lifetime. The author says things like, "this is what Sarah said about her role in the event in 1710 ... and this is what she said about the same event in 1740." I found these comparisons of what she said about herself very interesting. I have read about her in several biographies of her contemporaries (Queen Anne, for instance), but this is the first time I began to see her as an actual person -- complex, intelligent, passionate, interesting. I think I'll read it again! By the way, the author's source material is so extensive that listing them all takes up about 45% of the total book! Fascinating, well-researched, well-written, worth reading again.
Akinohn
still very excited when I receive it! A little disappointed with it being received little banged up it seems like it was you I thought I bought it new maybe its used like new I don't know....
Yllk
Quite frankly, this biography rambles and goes back and forth in its timeline, which, if you know nothing, or like me don't remember most of this period of British history, is downright confusing and disappointing. I stopped reading early on, glad I got the book for free and hadn't wasted my money.

And, by the way, I AM an Anglophile, loving all things British, but this book just couldn't get it together.
Fog
Book exactly as ordered. Not a good bio.
Lahorns Gods
I found this book valuable because unlike other books I have read it makes a serious attempt to evaluate Sarah Churchill's politics.

I became interested in Sarah Churchill after reading Hibbert's 'popular' biography of the Marlboroughs, which I enjoyed immensely. However he tends to skirt the issue of Sarah's politics, partly on the not unreasonable grounds that Queen Anne burnt nearly all her letters. What Hibbert does do is paint a very charming sketch of Sarah in the years after her husband died however.

I then read Gregg's biography of Queen Anne which I think very highly of. It kicks into touch the notion that Queen Anne was a nonentity, a trap which I am not entirely sure Ms Field escapes. I am not always sure of what Ms Field thinks, she is a very bright post-modern historian who likes to do her research and present all viewpoints.

Gregg however makes it clear that Anne was very conscious of her role as a servant of England who felt that keeping a balance between the influences of the political parties was crucial. Anne was an introvert, and apparently, rather like Cromwell, had a dialogue with her creator going which once she was monarch may have sustained her rather more than her friendship with Sarah Churchill, whose influence no doubt had been vital in the years leading up to her assuming the throne because of the confidence it had given her.

It is clear that Ms Field thinks Sarah was more than a beautiful/annoying vamp who attached herself to Marlborough/Anne and stole headlines. I am sure she is right in thinking this and the virtue of this book is that it makes a sustained effort to draw out a picture of Sarah as a player, and presents a picture of her as a conviction politician, whatever else she was.

I wonder if in fact a key fact in Sarah's life was her role in securing a healthy allowance for Anne before she assumed the throne, for which Anne was very grateful, and to achieve which Sarah had to stick her neck out bigtime. When once she became monarch Anne started to distance herself from Sarah's views, Sarah kicked out.
Awene
Sarah Churchill, 1st Duchess of Marlborough gained notoriety through three things:
1. She was a lady-in-waiting/best friend to Queen Anne of England. She took this position of power for granted, treating the Queen much like a dumb child. She felt it was her right to instruct the Queen on appropriate political decisions and appointments at court. When Sarah became too pushy and arrogant, the Queen severed the friendship, leading to a very public fall from favour.
2. She was married to the military man John Churchill, who defeated Louis XIV's French army in the early 1700s (A big thing at the time - remember England and France were arch enemies). This victory led Queen Anne to give John and Sarah titles (Duke and Duchess of Marlborough) and a huge government grant to build a massive palace with - Blenheim, which still stands today outside of Oxford UK.
3. Her direct descendents include Winston Churchill and Diana, Princess of Wales.
Ophelia Field has written a biography which covers all these events, and also tells us objectively about the woman herself. She does not attempt to paint a rosy picture of Sarah, who could be stubborn and domineering. At the same time, she explains WHY Sarah did certain things (based on letters she wrote to family and friends - many excerpts included), and why her political views were as they were. Crucially, she discusses how Sarah's support of the Whig party, her deep rooted belief in their righteousness, developed into a fanatacism which led to her fall from the Queen's favour and high society. Queen Anne is also brought to life as a woman all her own, though her reign was short.
This biography was informative, educational (about the political and aristocratic climate of the time 1680s-1720s), and fascinating. It portrayed a modern woman ahead of her time. I feel if I had met Sarah Churchill, I may not have liked her (she polarised people - you either loved or hated her), but I certainly would have respected and admired her.

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