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by George Gordon Lord Byron,Peter Quennell

  • ISBN: 0192827545
  • Author: George Gordon Lord Byron,Peter Quennell
  • ePub ver: 1789 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1789 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 832
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (September 13, 1990)
  • Formats: mbr rtf mobi azw
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub Byron: A Self-Portrait: Letters and Diaries 1798-1824 (Oxford Paperbacks) download

Most everybody in the educated world, literary or not, has this curious idea that they know all about Lord Byron, who he was, what he was like in person and as poet

Most everybody in the educated world, literary or not, has this curious idea that they know all about Lord Byron, who he was, what he was like in person and as poet. This strange phenomenon has arisen due in no small part to the literary establishment's creation, in Byron's time and in our own, of what is known and taught as the "Byronic hero": A gloomy, world-weary figure, an aristocrat and roué.

Drawing on letters from Byron's pre-Harrow days to those written in the weeks before his death, Quennell has pieced . Byron, a Self Portrait: Letters and Diaries, 1798-1824, with. Volume 1 George Gordon Byron Baron Byron Snippet view - 1950.

Drawing on letters from Byron's pre-Harrow days to those written in the weeks before his death, Quennell has pieced together the extraordinary story of Byron's life as told by himself. Byron, a self-portrait: letters and diaries, 1798 to 1824, with hitherto. Baron George Gordon Byron Byron Snippet view - 1950.

Home Browse Books Book details, Byron, a Self-Portrait: Letters and Diaries, 1798. Ay me! what perils do environ The man that meddles with Lord Byron! murmured a volatile acquaintance caught in the web of the strange Byronic destiny

Home Browse Books Book details, Byron, a Self-Portrait: Letters and Diaries, 1798. Ay me! what perils do environ The man that meddles with Lord Byron! murmured a volatile acquaintance caught in the web of the strange Byronic destiny. It is a complaint that every biographer of Byron must now and then have echoed; for, although Byron is the most alluring of themes, and although there is no other great man who appears at first sight to reveal himself more readily, his character, if we study him closely enough and follow him hard enough, often seems, as our knowledge increases, to be.

Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press. Quennell, Peter, 1905-1993. inlibrary; printdisabled;.

Author:Byron, Lord George Gordon. Lord George Gordon Byron. Place of Publication. Oxford Letters & Memoirs. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Drawing on letters from Byron's pre-Harrow days to those written in the weeks before his death, Quennell has pieced together the extraordinary story of Byron's life as told by himself.

Byron : A Self-Portrait, 1798-1824. With this fascinating selection of correspondence written by one of England's greatest letter writers, Peter Quennell comes as close as anyone can to salvaging what was lost by the alleged actions of one overcautious publisher

Byron : A Self-Portrait, 1798-1824. Select Format: Paperback. With this fascinating selection of correspondence written by one of England's greatest letter writers, Peter Quennell comes as close as anyone can to salvaging what was lost by the alleged actions of one overcautious publisher.

Sir Peter Courtney Quennell CBE (9 March 1905 – 27 October 1993) was .

He wrote extensively on social history. To Lord Byron: Feminine Profiles – based upon unpublished letters 1807–1824 (1939) with George Paston. Caroline of England: An Augustan Portrait (1940). Brown the Bear: Who scared the villagers out of their wits (circa 1940), translator Katharine Busvine. Byron In Italy (1941). Mayhew's Characters (1951).

Byron, a self portrait: letters and diaries, 1798-1824, with hitherto unpublished letters. 1967, Humanities Press. Byron, a self portrait: letters and diaries 1798-1824. 1967, Humanities Press, by arrangement with John Murray. in English - Byron, a self portrait: letters and diaries, 1798-1824, with hitherto unpublished letters.

Selected Verse and Prose Works Including Letters and Extracts from Lord Byron's Journal and Diaries, 1959.

Mayhew's Characters (1951). Selected Verse and Prose Works Including Letters and Extracts from Lord Byron's Journal and Diaries, 1959. An Illustrated History of the British and American Peoples (1960), with Alan Hodge. The Sign of the Fish (1960). Byronic Thoughts: Maxims Reflections Portraits From the Prose and Verse of Lord Byron (1961).

Find nearly any book by George Gordon Lord Byron. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Complete Poetical Works: Volume I (c OET t Oxford English Texts). by George Gordon Lord Byron. ISBN 9780198127567 (978-0-19-812756-7) Hardcover, Clarendon Press, 1986.

Literary legend has it that Byron left behind the beginnings of an autobiography, but that his publisher, John Murray, destroyed it after his death because he found it too shocking. With this fascinating selection of correspondence written by one of England's greatest letter writers, Peter Quennell comes as close as anyone can to salvaging what was lost by the alleged actions of one overcautious publisher. Drawing on letters from Byron's pre-Harrow days to those written in the weeks before his death, Quennell has pieced together the extraordinary story of Byron's life as told by himself. As Byron records his thoughts as a schoolboy, man-of-the-world, rake and womanizer, literary sensation, and poet-in-exile, he reveals the rebellious, warm-hearted, disorderly, fun-loving, and neurotic sides to his private character. The volume conveys how his writing, veering from racy vulgarity to polished eloquence, vividly evokes the worlds in which he lived--London and Venetian high society, the Swiss and Italian countryside, and the Greek war tents at Missolonghi. It also includes Byron's journals reprinted in full.
Comments (2)

Awene
Most everybody in the educated world, literary or not, has this curious idea that they know all about Lord Byron, who he was, what he was like in person and as poet. This strange phenomenon has arisen due in no small part to the literary establishment's creation, in Byron's time and in our own, of what is known and taught as the "Byronic hero": A gloomy, world-weary figure, an aristocrat and roué. But to read these nearly 800 pages of letters and diaries is to get to know the man in full, as rife with contradictory impulses as any other human being - rather than some two-dimensional stock figure. I must admit that I did not know upon embarking on this volume whether I would like or appreciate the "real Byron," so to speak. But, after figuratively putting myself in his shoes for over a week now, I feel that he is an old friend, whom I feel it impossible to dislike, warts and all. In one of his letters to publisher John Murray, Byron confides, "I am not sure that long life is desirable for one of my constitutional depression of Spirits, which of course I suppress in society; but which breaks out when alone, and in my writings in spite of myself." There is no real way to "review" exactly this collection of writings which broke out when Byron was alone save to proffer the prospective reader some of the striking quotes which shed light on Byron at various stages of his life:

"The reason that adulation is not displeasing is, that, though untrue, it shows one to be of consequence enough, in one way or other, to induce people to lie, to make us their friend."

"There is something to me very softening in the presence of a woman, - some strange influence, even if one is not in love with them - which I cannot at all account for, having no very high opinion of the sex. But yet, - I always feel in better humour with myself and every thing else, if there is a woman within ken."

"You are right, Gifford is right, Crabbe is right, Hobhouse is right - you are all right, and I am all wrong; but do, pray, let me have that pleasure. Cut me up root and branch; quarter me like the Quarterly; send round my disjecti membra poetae, like those of Levite's Concubine; make me, if you will, a spectacle to men and angels; but don't ask me to alter, for I can't: - I am obstinate and lazy - and there's the truth."

Writing of his poem "Don Juan": "Could any man have written it who has not lived in the world? - And fooled in a post-chaise? - In a hackney coach? - In a gondola? - Against a wall? - In a court carriage? In a vis à vis? - On a table? - And under it?"

"It is singular how soon we lose the impression of what ceases to be constantly before us. A year impairs, a lustre obliterates. There is little distinct left without an effort of memory: then indeed the lights are rekindled for a moment; but who can be sure that Imagination is not the torch-bearer? Let any man try at the end of ten years to bring before him the features, or the mind, or the sayings, or the habits, of his best friend, and he will be surprised at the extreme confusion of his ideas."

"In general, I do not draw well with literary men: not that I dislike them, but I never know what to say to them after I have praised their last publication. There are several exceptions, to be sure; but then they have either been men of the world, such as Scott, and Moore, etc., or visionaries out of it, such as Shelley."

I could, of course, go on for quite some time but for the 1,000 word limit which Amazon imposes upon me here, but I hope that these diverse states of mind, of mood, of age, of circumstance grant the reader an idea of the richness of personality depicted in these writings. "But who WAS Byron, really?" some may ask. I'll allow him the last word on it:

"Last year (in June, 1819), I met at Count Mosti's, at Ferrara, an Italian who asked me "if I knew Lord Byron?" I told him NO (no one knows himself, you know)."
Dorintrius
I doubt there's going to be a revival of interest in Byron anytime soon, which is a pity because he's a great poet as well as a very interesting "romantic" personality.

Ergo, reading Marchand's lengthy bio of Byron (or later bios if there are such) is probably not necessary if you want a grasp of his person and place in English lit. For that, Quennell's biography of Byron likely will provide with all you want and need to know.

Supplementing it with the "self-portrait" edited by Quennell is possibly supererogatory, but it's still a good read for those who want to experience the ipsissimi verbi of this once-famous poet.

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