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by Andrew L. Simon,Harry Hill Bandholtz

  • ISBN: 0966573463
  • Author: Andrew L. Simon,Harry Hill Bandholtz
  • ePub ver: 1417 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1417 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 320
  • Publisher: Simon Publications (October 1, 2000)
  • Formats: doc rtf lrf azw
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Historical
epub An Undiplomatic Diary download

His diaries display a straightforward military man of honor who nonetheless relishes the ironies and absurdities of events around him as he struggles to see the right thing done.

His diaries display a straightforward military man of honor who nonetheless relishes the ironies and absurdities of events around him as he struggles to see the right thing done. Not only is it a critical primary source for an obscure but important piece of history, but it is a moving and, at times, screamingly funny read.

Harry Hill Bandholtz. Harry Hill Bandholtz. Harry Hill Bandholtz (painting) by Gyula Stetka (1920). The incident is described in detail in his book An Undiplomatic Diary by the American Member of the Inter-Allied Military Mission to Hungary, 1919-1920. Today the crop is on display in the Hungarian National Museum. Romanian representatives objected to the memorial. Simon, Andrew . ed. Major General Harry Hill Bandholtz: An Undiplomatic Diary. Safety Harbor: Simon Publications, 2000. Davis, j. Henry Blaine (1998).

An Undiplomatic Diary book. Lieutenant General Bandholtz was appointed United States representative in 1919

An Undiplomatic Diary book. Lieutenant General Bandholtz was appointed United States representative in 1919. His highly readable diary gives vivid insight into the turbulent period when Hungary was destroyed by war. Get A Copy.

An Undiplomatic Diary. by Harry H. Bandholtz, Ed. By Andrew L. Simon, Contrib. By Fritz Konrad Kruger

An Undiplomatic Diary. By Fritz Konrad Kruger.

Harry Hill Bandholtz (December 18, 1864 – May 11, 1925) was a United States Army career officer who served for more than a decade in the . Safety Harbor: Simon Publications, 2000

Harry Hill Bandholtz (December 18, 1864 – May 11, 1925) was a United States Army career officer who served for more than a decade in the Philippines. He was a Major General during World War I, and the US representative of the Inter-Allied Military Mission in Hungary in 1919. YouTube Encyclopedic.

by Harry Hill Bandholtz. Published 1966 by AMS Press in New York Harry Hill Bandholtz (1864-1925). Published 1966 by AMS Press in New York. History, Inter-allied military mission to Hungary, 1919-1920, Territorial questions, World War, 1914-1918. Harry Hill Bandholtz (1864-1925). Revolution, 1918-1919.

An Undiplomatic Diary - Corvinus Library - Hungarian History. Introductionby Andrew L. SimonMajor General Harry Hill Bandholtz was America’s representative to theInter-Allied Supreme Command’s Military Mission in Hungary at the end ofWorld War I. Before the first world war, Bandholtz was Chief of the in the Philippines from 1907 until 1913.

Major General Harry Hill Bandholtz: An Undiplomatic Diary. With an Introduction on Hungary and WWI. by Fritz-Konrad Krüger. Copy of the original book courtesy of the Cleveland Public Library Reference Department. Published by Simon Publications, . Box 321, Safety Harbor, FL 34695 Printed by Lightning Print, Inc. La Vergne, TN 37086. Introduction 1 Hungary and World War I. 5 Preliminaries to Bandholtz’s Arrival in Hungary 19. An Undiplomatic Diary 23. Simon Publications, LLC. Book Format.

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Lieutenant General Bandholtz was appointed United States representative in 1919. His highly readable diary gives vivid insight into the turbulent period when Hungary was destroyed by war.
Comments (2)

Joni_Dep
Woodrow Wilson promulgated an idealistic solution for the problems of Central Europe: the right of national self-determination. This apparently simple and self-evidently just doctrine ignored a host of psychological, historical, geographical, and above all, political complexities. Sure enough, in the Versailles peace process following WWI, the major powers and minor players pulled and twisted the doctrine to tatters in order to promote their own interests. Nowhere was the result as geographically dramatic as in the case of Hungary. Harry Hill Bandholtz, the American Allied representative in Budapest during some of the chaotic years between the armistice of 1918 and the Treaty of Trianon of 1921, witnessed the conniving, skullduggery, venality, and sometimes brutality of both his allied "bretheren" and all the local nationalities at first hand. He stood alone, at times, trying to enforce order and justice. Thanks to a stroke of luck that put him at the head of the Allied Commission in the nick of time, he single-handedly saved Budapest from a complete sacking by the Romanian forces who occupied it briefly. His diaries display a straightforward military man of honor who nonetheless relishes the ironies and absurdities of events around him as he struggles to see the right thing done. Not only is it a critical primary source for an obscure but important piece of history, but it is a moving and, at times, screamingly funny read.
Xurad
There is not much difference between the press coverage given to Hungary in 1919-1920 and now by willful misrepresention of the aspirations of a country which had been ruled since 1492 (death of the last Hungarian king, Mattias Corvinus) by foreign rulers who tried mightily and unceasingly to remake the character, traditions and history of this nation. Gen. Bandholtz starts right off with the "well-established fact that (Hungary's) Prime Minister, Count Stephan Tisza, was the only leading statesman of the Dual Empire who opposed the fateful ultimatum of Serbia, the rejection of which led to the outbreak of the World War", and this not only once, until the end of that fateful July of 1914. But this review's purpose is not to quote from the DIARY but rather to encourage all those who are truly interested in the forces at work at that time to read it, and right after that PARIS 1919 by Margaret MacMillan. What an eyeopener both of these volumes are!

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