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epub Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theatetus and The Sophist (Philosophical Classics) download

by Francis M. Cornford,Plato

  • ISBN: 0486427633
  • Author: Francis M. Cornford,Plato
  • ePub ver: 1447 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1447 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 352
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (April 25, 2003)
  • Formats: lrf txt docx rtf
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
epub Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theatetus and The Sophist (Philosophical Classics) download

Where Cornford's books shine is in placing and interpreting Plato in his historical context, and showing .

Where Cornford's books shine is in placing and interpreting Plato in his historical context, and showing how, in that context, Plato's ideas were insightful, even brilliant, and represented huge conceptual advances over what had gone before.

Similar books and articles. Lambertus Marie de Rijk - 1986. Unity and Development in Plato's Metaphysics. Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theatetus and the Sophist. Plato and Parmenides Francis Macdonald Cornford: Plato and Parmenides.

In the Sophist, a related dialog, Plato redefines the term "sophist," which hitherto had connoted one who gives .

In the Sophist, a related dialog, Plato redefines the term "sophist," which hitherto had connoted one who gives sophia (wisdom) to his disciples. Plato depreciated the term, and ever since, in philosophy, sophistry indicates the deceptive exploitation of linguistic ambiguities. Both works pose eternal questions that keep these dialogs ever-relevant not only for students of philosophy but also for every reader and thinker.

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Plato's Theory of Knowledge: The Theaetetus and the Sophist.

This article introduces Plato’s dialogue the Theaetetus (section 1), and briefly summarises its plot (section 2). Two leading interpretations of the dialogue, the Unitarian and Revisionist readings, are contrasted in section 3. Sections 4 t. . Sections 4 to 8 explain and discuss the main arguments of the chief divisions of the dialogue. The Theaetetus, which probably dates from about 369 BC, is arguably Plato’s greatest work on epistemology. Arguably, it is his greatest work on anything. Plato (. 27–347 BC) has much to say about the nature of knowledge elsewhere. But only the Theaetetus offers a set-piece discussion of the question What is knowledge?

The Theatetus and The Sophist (Philosophical Classics).

The Theatetus and The Sophist (Philosophical Classics). Published April 25, 2003 by Dover Publications About the Book. Some dialogues of Plato are of so various a character that their relation to the other dialogues cannot be determined with any degree of certainty. The Theaetetus, like the Parmenides, has points of similarity both with his earlier and his later writings. The perfection of style, the humour, the dramatic interest, the complexity of structure, the fertility of illustration, the shifting of the points of view, are characteristic of his best period of authorship.

International Library of Psychology Philosophy and Scientific Method Plato's Theory of Knowledge. I have since added the Sophist. Meanwhile the book has been announced under the title, Plato's Theory of Knowledge, which may seem to promise more than I have performed.

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Translated by the noted classical scholar Francis M. Cornford, this edition of two masterpieces of Plato's later period features extensive ongoing commentaries by Cornford that provide helpful background information and valuable insights. Both works pose eternal questions that keep these dialogs ever-relevant not only for students of philosophy but also for every reader and thinker. The Theatetus offers a systematic treatment of the question, "What is knowledge?" Most of the dialog takes place between Socrates and the student Theatetus. Among the answers they explore: knowledge as perception; knowledge as true belief; knowledge as true belief plus an account (i.e., a justified true belief); as well as variations on each of these answers. Like most Socratic dialogs, the Theatetus ends without a definitive answer — leaving the subject open for the reader's further consideration. In the Sophist, a related dialog, Plato redefines the term "sophist," which hitherto had connoted one who gives sophia (wisdom) to his disciples. Plato depreciated the term, and ever since, in philosophy, sophistry indicates the deceptive exploitation of linguistic ambiguities. The dialog follows Socrates' cross-examination of a self-proclaimed true philosopher, The Stranger, on the distinction between philosophers, statesmen, and sophists.
Comments (5)

Ionzar
This book is good only if you want the translator's commentary on Plato's two works Theaetetus and Sophist. For Theaetetus, most of the dialogue is present save for a few spots the commentary replaces what it deems "tedious text". Granted the commentary is nice for helping understanding the whole trilogy (Statesman is absent but rounds out the discussion within this volume) and how Plato compares to other philosophers of the time like Aristotle. But this is why I give it two stars, when it comes to the Sophist, nearly the entire dialogue is replaced by the commentary on the grounds that the modern reader would find it very boring. After nearly twenty pages of commentary, you finally get to the dialogue and it lasts for about two paragraphs and then back to twenty more pages of commentary. If you want to read somebody's thoughts on Plato's two works, Theaetetus and Sophist this book is fine. If you want to read Plato's actual dialogues Theaetetus and Sophist, I would recommend looking else where
asAS
You can't go wrong with the commentary of Francis Macdonald Cornford. The aspiring Plato disciple should absolutely get this along with his other translation/commentary volumes, e.g. "Plato and Parmenides" (the Parmenides), "Plato's Cosmology" (the Timaeus), and possibly the Republic.
Mr_KiLLaURa
met all my expectations
Dagdalas
The author credits for this book should really include Francis M. Cornford, the early 20th century classicist whose commentary accounts for more words in the text than do his translations of the actual dialogs. Some might find the constantly interjected commentary annoying - I found it very helpful. So much so that after reading "Plato's Theory of Knowledge", I purchased a used copy of Cornford's out-of-print "Plato and Parmenides", which I am still in the middle of reading. Between the two, they have much improved my understanding of the philosopher, Plato.

I am not a Platonist by any stretch of the imagination. When it comes to any of the subject matter of philosophy, I am constantly led to the simple conclusion that Plato was wrong - he wasn't right about anything! But Plato's importance in the history of philosophy is another matter, entirely. Where Cornford's books shine is in placing and interpreting Plato in his historical context, and showing how, in that context, Plato's ideas were insightful, even brilliant, and represented huge conceptual advances over what had gone before.

The three dialogs in these two books (the Parmenides, Theaetetus, and Sophist) show Plato acknowledging the immense debt he owed to two philosophers who had gone before - Heraclitus and Parmenides (the influence of the other great pre-Socratic, Pythagoras, in these dialogs is more subtle, but still detectable). The ideas of Heraclitus and Parmenides - both of whom still had followers in Plato's day - were ground breaking, but taken alone, either system had major problems. The relentless logic of Parmenides seemed to show that the perceptible world with its movement and diversity - all that we know - could be nothing but illusion. On the other hand, Heraclitus' insistence on the ubiquity of change seemed to deny the possibility of stable objects of knowledge, and hence, of knowledge itself. Cornford presents Plato's theory of Forms as a rich and flexible alternative to these prior views. It becomes clear that, whatever its ultimate failings as ontology or even epistemology (my analysis, not Cornford's), the theory of Forms was a much better way of thinking about the world than any that had arisen before, in the Greek world.

As an added benefit, Cornford, in numerous asides, throws much light on the differences between Plato's Forms and the Categories and logic of Aristotle, which the distance of time, and the incorporation of elements of both into Christian theology in the middle ages, might otherwise cause to be conflated.

I strongly recommend these books to anyone interested in Greek thought, or the history of philosophical ideas.
Adoraris
Language is a tool that two people who know what they are doing can use to facilitate the way they work together. Philosophy is an introduction to issues that arise when ideal conditions can be pictured only long ago and in another country. American education resembles philosophy when it fails to teach students how to do anything. Dialectic is a form of fiction that attempts to give literary life to two or more characters. For an author like Kierkegaard, it was easy to associate the concept of irony with Socrates because so many of the Plato fictions that used Socrates as a character described a problem in thinking that the Greeks called an aporia.

The dialogues included in the Plato's Theory of Knowledge (1957) by Francis M. Cornford provides an opportunity to observe:

Now we must turn to look
at those who put the matter
in a different way, so that,
from a complete review of
all, we may see that reality
is just as hard to define as
unreality. (p. 228).

Whenever government used to be a matter that was of interest to philosophers, they had some concerns that currently escape the pursuit of free markets by the department of the material fetish which has the top priority for an economy that seeks to benefit from a global system for reducing everything to the marginal thinking of millionaires and billionaires. Good luck with that.

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