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epub A Year in Van Nuys download

by Sandra Tsing Loh

  • ISBN: 0609608126
  • Author: Sandra Tsing Loh
  • ePub ver: 1809 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1809 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 240
  • Publisher: Crown Archetype; 1st edition (April 24, 2001)
  • Formats: txt lit lrf rtf
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
epub A Year in Van Nuys download

Sandra Tsing Loh (Chinese: 陸賽靜; pinyin: Lù Sàijìng, born February 11, 1962) is an American writer, actress, radio personality, and . Loh is the author of several books, including the l A Year in Van Nuys.

Sandra Tsing Loh (Chinese: 陸賽靜; pinyin: Lù Sàijìng, born February 11, 1962) is an American writer, actress, radio personality, and former professor of art at the University of California, Irvine.

by. Loh, Sandra Tsing. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by booksale-cataloger3 on September 27, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Sandra Tsing Loh's latest book reads more like a series of her hilarious essays cloaked in the guise of a novel. The novel's structure follows the character of "Sandra" through one year of her life as she struggles with writers block, perilously careens towards 36, and lives in of all places-horrors!-Van Nuys California. Yes, I believe it's that good. She's both arrogant and self-deprecating at the same time. It's a lethal combination and downright brilliant!

A Year in Van Nuys book.

A Year in Van Nuys book. Her work has appeared in Best American Essays.

Sandra Tsing Loh, a self-described neurotic, nonachieving, downwardly mobile Dumpy, has started to come out of. .

Sandra Tsing Loh, a self-described neurotic, nonachieving, downwardly mobile Dumpy, has started to come out of denial over the fact that she does not live in Provence. Not only does she not live in Provence, she doesn’t even live in a nice part of Los Angeles. In A Year in Van Nuys, we find Sandra, an obscure writer, blocked at page 100 of her Great American Novel - the one that, when finished, will bring her fame, fortune, and the requisite country house in Provence.

Sandra Tsing Loh, a self-described neurotic, nonachieving, downwardly mobile Dumpy, has started to come out of denial over the fact that she does not live i.Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Sandra Tsing Loh (Chinese: 陸賽靜; pinyin: Lù Sàijìng, born February 11, 1962) is an American writer, actress, and radio personality.

By Sandra Tsing Loh. Sept. Recently I've started coming out of denial over the fact that I do not live in Provence. Not only do I not live in Provence, I do not even live in a nice part of Los Angeles. It's true that when we first moved to Van Nuys & this ethnically mixed, lass suburb in the sun-swept grid of the San Fernando Valley & it didn't seem such a hellish place to live. My hand-painted Italian ceramic coffee cup rattled in its saucer but once a month due to wheeling police helicopters.

Sandra Tsing Loh, a self-described neurotic, nonachieving, downwardly mobile “Dumpy,” has started to come out of denial over the fact that she does not live in Provence. Not only does she not live in Provence, she doesn’t even live in a nice part of Los Angeles. This upper-lower-middle-class suburb in the sun-swept grid of the San Fernando Valley, consistently ranked one of the worst places to live in America, whose night sky is flamed by a million fast-food neon signs and whose streets are chockablock with carnicerias, taquerias, and pupuserias, will, she’s pretty sure, never be Provence.In A Year in Van Nuys, we find Sandra, an obscure writer, blocked at page 100 of her Great American Novel — the one that, when finished, will bring her fame, fortune, and the requisite country house in Provence. She’s 35 and she has eyebags like Bert Lahr, a too-rich, too-thin sister who torments her about her lack of initiative, and a $300-an-hour Malibu therapist. She writes for a failing women’s website — Amelia.com — makes a disastrous appearance on CNN, entertains a network’s idea about making a sitcom of her life, especially her eyebags, and watches new and old acquaintances alike succeed wildly at various pursuits. And this is merely the tip of the iceberg of a year in Sandra’s life. Divided by season — The Winter of Our Discontent, Spring Without Bending Your Knees, Summer Where We Winter, and Fall of Our Dearest Expectations — Sandra’s narrative charts a hilarious course through the anti-Hollywood, a morbid inferno that none other than Robert Redford called a “furnace that could destroy any creative thought that managed to creep into your brain.”The result of this journey? Not thinner thighs, smoother skin, or a kind of space-age Zen Buddhist acceptance. (Notwithstanding the fact that a wise [gay] man notes that even Madonna has an inner Van Nuys.) No, the true grail turns out to be, unbelievably enough, Maturity. Which coincides, sadly, with the official end of Youth. Which, after a brief mourning period, turns out to be an odd relief for Sandra. After all, when one is no longer burdened by Youth, or Promise, or Potential, or even worldly Interest, a writer finally finds . . . the rush is over. Sandra has all the time in the world. And on a sunny blue-sky morning, a story begins to occur to her — of a 35-year-old, with Bert Lahr eyebags, who was blocked in the course of a Great American Novel in a colorful, tattered little outpost called Van Nuys . . .
Comments (7)

NI_Rak
Saying that it's parochial and esoteric and only giving four stars doesn't mean I didn't enjoy it and that I don't buy every Loh. The ideal reader, however, for whom this would be a five+++
would be a female writer who lives, or has lived, in Los Angeles, watches television, and has read Peter Mayle's "A Year in Provence." Not qualifying on any of the above,I missed some of the cultural references and some brilliant satirical points were lost on me. The deficiencies are mine, not Loh's.
It does not have a plot in the usual novelistic sense, except that it describes the events of a year. Some of the essays or anecdotes, such as the account of her relationship with a WEB magazine are linked. Her relationships with her husband and sister form leitmotifs. It is a collection of self-deprecating humorous pieces of the type one reads in in syndicated newspaper columns by such people as David barry or the late Irma Bombeck.
She doesn't succeed in making Van Nuys sound all that bad. I've been there once and thought it was quite nice.
Wiliniett
Sandra Tsing Loh's latest book reads more like a series of her hilarious essays cloaked in the guise of a novel. The novel's structure follows the character of "Sandra" through one year of her life as she struggles with writers block, perilously careens towards 36, and lives in of all places-horrors!-Van Nuys California. All of this is done with her bone dry humor in rare form, especially in the earlier half of the novel when she's expounding on the Zone diet, and Bally's Total Fitness. I loved the first two thirds, then felt it petered out a little by the end. Living in Los Angeles I found alot of the book really funny, although I don't know how people outside the city would relate. However most people in their mid thirties will find her characters plight at "what am I doing with my life" syndrome very real, funny, and a little bit scary. If you're a fan of David Sedaris, N.P.R., or just like to feel like you're hip and in the know, you'd probably enjoy this.
Flocton
Sandra Tsing Loh is one of the funniest writers in the U.S. and this book is a must-read. She is devastatingly dead-on in her critiques of L.A.-area "society," which, even to someone like me who has never visited the area, means I never HAVE to, because I couldn't know it any better than through her eyes. Her frustration with, and hilariously expressed anger at, the superficiality of the society that she finds herself in is wonderful to read if you have ever experienced that profound shallowness masquerading as self-importance that she seems to confront in just about everyone she deals with every day. If you're an intelligent person trying to fit into American society, she is your spokesperson. It's so fulfilling to find someone who can articulate her disgust with cultural stupidity in such a hilarious way. It just makes you feel good. She is a national treasure.
Arcanefire
I have taken an interest in Sandra Loh's writing for a combination of reasons, including that I met her when she was a freshman, that I took a class with her brother, and that I've heard her say some very funny things on NPR. While she can be hilarious at times, at other times her absorption in "The Valley" leaves me yawning a bit. Although a native of Southern California I was born in the other (the San Gabriel) valley, and have never lived in the San Fernando valley. Although I "get" all the local references I don't find them all raucously funny; I can imagine readers unfamiliar with Southern California being completely lost while trying to understand some of her jokes. This latest work starts off with a strong focus on "The Valley" that I didn't find very engaging. Midway through it transitions to a more universal consideration of the perils of aging and the abandonment of youthful expectations and becomes much funnier; it is also poignant at times. This book is amusing and worth reading, but don't go in with excessive expectations.
Mullador
What other compliments can I pay than saying that I ran out and bought every single one of her last books. She is absolutely the most insightfully funny writer alive. Superb book that deserves six stars! Looking forward to reading more books by her. (Go Sandra.)
Kitaxe
This was a an entertaining book for someone new to Van Nuys/the San Fernando Valley. An easy read- worth it to me.
Unereel
A dive into the swirling mind of a truly gifted and original writer. A Year in Van Nuys is like nothing I've read before and madly entertaining. And I do mean madly. This gal is downright cracked, and I LOVE her for it.

So, why one star? Sandra Tsing Loh, who lives in "a strange little corner with no rules," might believe that a star-rating label system for the masses is too provincial and I wouldn't want to insult her. (She might also appreciate the tough love, as I certainly did when she recounts her appearance at a writing workshop.) I would give her 365 stars if I could-one for each day of the Year in Van Nuys. From here I'm going straight to the search mechanism to become a computer stalker of her material. Yes, I believe it's that good. She's both arrogant and self-deprecating at the same time. It's a lethal combination and downright brilliant!

To anyone reading this review: loosen up, buy this book and laugh with Sandra Tsing Loh.

Michele Cozzens, Author of A Line Between Friends and The Things I Wish I'd Said.
Good book. I heard reviews on it, so I bought it. Fairly interesting, but not as great as I expected. Tries too hard to be "Carrie Bradshaw"-esque but not quite there.

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