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by Geoff Nicholson

  • ISBN: 1594484031
  • Author: Geoff Nicholson
  • ePub ver: 1872 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1872 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 288
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books; 1 edition (November 3, 2009)
  • Formats: lrf mbr azw lit
  • Category: Memoris
  • Subcategory: Arts & Literature
epub The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism download

Электронная книга "The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism", Geoff Nicholson.

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After spending a couple evenings with The Lost Art of Walking (2008) you’ll probably conclude that walking as a medium of expression is anything but defunct. Nicholson has gathered a thick bundle of quirky walking tales and interlaced them with stories of his own curious pedestrian habits.

Geoff Nicholson is the author of twenty books, including Sex Collectors, Hunters and Gatherers, The Food . I really enjoyed this look at everything relating to walking, subtitled "the history, science, and literature of pedestrianism

Geoff Nicholson is the author of twenty books, including Sex Collectors, Hunters and Gatherers, The Food Chain, and Bleeding London, which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize. He divides his time between Los Angeles and London. I really enjoyed this look at everything relating to walking, subtitled "the history, science, and literature of pedestrianism. Besides talking about his own walks, and how he broke his arm while walking near his . home, the author looks at walking in fiction, walking in the movies, walking in music.

Geoff Nicholson is a master chronicler of the hidden subversive twists on a seemingly normal activity. He analyzes the hows, wheres, and whys of walking through the ages

Geoff Nicholson is a master chronicler of the hidden subversive twists on a seemingly normal activity. He analyzes the hows, wheres, and whys of walking through the ages. He finds people who walk only at night, or naked, or for thousands of miles at a time, in costume, for causes, or for no reason whatsoever. Here, he brings curiosity and genuine insight to a subject that often walks right past us.

Nicholson not only discussed walking in art, movies, songs, literature and history, but also writes about phenomenal feats of walking. All that interspersed with his personal anecdotes

Nicholson not only discussed walking in art, movies, songs, literature and history, but also writes about phenomenal feats of walking. All that interspersed with his personal anecdotes. Although about two very different forms of foot travel I think I can safely put this book on par with Born to Run by Christopher McDougall. I so thoroughly enjoyed this book and Mr. Nicholson's writing style that next time I am in a bookstore I am going to stroll over and check out the others he has written. ChristineEllei, July 14, 2015.

Bibliographic Details. Geoff Nicholson is the author of twenty books, including Sex Collectors, Hunters and Gatherers, The Food Chain, and Bleeding London, which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize

Bibliographic Details. Title: The Lost Art of Walking: The History,. Publisher: Riverhead Books. Publication Date: 2009. Geoff Nicholson is the author of twenty books, including Sex Collectors, Hunters and Gatherers, The Food Chain, and Bleeding London, which was shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize. Visit Seller's Storefront. Excellent customer service.

Autobiography: Literary. Trade Paperback (Us),Unsewn, Adhesive Bound. Country of Publication.

Title:-The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism. Genre:-Biography, Autobiography. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 2 brand new listings. Autobiography: Literary.

of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism He examines the history and traditions of walking and its role as inspiration.

The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism. Nicholson finds people who walk only at night, or naked, or in the shape of a cross or a circle, or for thousands of miles at a time, in costume, for causes, or for no reason whatsoever. He examines the history and traditions of walking and its role as inspiration to artists, musicians, and writers like Bob Dylan, Charles Dickens, and Buster Keaton. In The Lost Art of Walking, he brings curiosity, imagination, and genuine insight to a subject that often strides, shuffles, struts, or lopes right by us. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

How we walk, where we walk, why we walk tells the world who and what we are. Whether it's once a day to the car, or for long weekend hikes, or as competition, or as art, walking is a profoundly universal aspect of what makes us humans, social creatures, and engaged with the world.

How we walk, where we walk, why we walk tells the world who and what we are. Whether it's once a day to the car, or for long weekend hikes, or as competition, or as art, walking is a profoundly universal aspect of what makes us humans, social creatures, and engaged with the world. Cultural commentator, Whitbread Prize winner, and author of Sex Collectors Geoff Nicholson offers his fascinating, definitive, and personal ruminations on the literature, science, philosophy, art, and history of walking.Nicholson finds people who walk only at night, or naked, or in the shape of a cross or a circle, or for thousands of miles at a time, in costume, for causes, or for no reason whatsoever. He examines the history and traditions of walking and its role as inspiration to artists, musicians, and writers like Bob Dylan, Charles Dickens, and Buster Keaton. In The Lost Art of Walking, he brings curiosity, imagination, and genuine insight to a subject that often strides, shuffles, struts, or lopes right by us. 
Comments (7)

Silvermaster
I really enjoyed this look at everything relating to walking, subtitled "the history, science, and literature of pedestrianism." Besides talking about his own walks, and how he broke his arm while walking near his L.A. home, the author looks at walking in fiction, walking in the movies, walking in music. You get the picture.

Walking in L.A., walking in New York City, and walking in London are also covered. Beyond that, almost any walking topic you can imagine, such as walking on the moon or labyrinth walking, are also touched on.

This may all sound rather dull but it isn't. Nicholson has a lively writing style, though he does get bogged down in a few places. This book is quite fun.
Hugifyn
I ordered this book sight unseen after reading a favorable review in one of my favorite magazines The Economist. I have always been a huge fan of walking - seeing the world from 5+ feet, moving on at a pace that allows one to engage and disengage at will.

What I ordered this book I hoped to see something on physiology, psychology or philosophy of walking. Instead, this book treats one to a high-speed flow of consciousness - any which thought that flits into the author's mind as he walks goes straight onto the page. The man has an active mind, and the book runs at a pace of a noisy blender.

Now that I had the book in hand, I looked at the dust cover blurbs:

"...demented charm" - Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times
"...not for the faint of heart" - Stephanie Zacharek, Salon.

Wow! When a major reviewer calls a writer demented and the publisher puts that on the back of the book, that is bizzarre, to say the least.

I am sure the author has his audience, and there will be people who'll love this book. Like chewing gum or watching game shows, it will take you away from your life and into another reality. My copy, however, is going right back to amazon.
Mr_KiLLaURa
Love it.
Hap
Better than expected. Haha it was interesting and funny.
Gindian
I had been training for the Vierdaagse in Netherlands. I'm older, so my walk length was about 80 miles in 4 days. Needless to say, I put in some training hours. This book just gave me some laughs and induced some pondering in my off hours soaking my feet.
Shakataxe
Service excellent. The book is sometimes funny, sometimes interesting.
Yllk
Reading this book can be a shambling, tedious bit of exercise. Story telling about Garry Winogrand and the other street photographers catches the reader. Listening to Satie's Gymnopedies on a nocturnal walk is a fine thought. His bibliography is a source. To each, his own attraction.
The Lost Art of Walking: The History, Science, and Literature of Pedestrianism
If you have about four free hours available you could either read this book or go for an extended walk. Provided your surroundings are sufficiently inviting and it is a pleasant day, you may prefer the walk.

Nicholson is not promoting walking as a social cause. He believes we cannot expect grand changes in people's willingness to walk when they have more convenient alternatives available. He says that he himself walks not because it is environmentally correct, but because it keeps him sane and it helps him write.

The book is a ramble, a wandering. Do not expect systematic accounts of the history, science, philosophy, or literature of pedestrianism, as the subtitle suggests. Instead, what you will get is a potpourri of ruminations, many only tangentially related to walking, held together only by the thread of Nicholson's own idiosyncratic preoccupations.

Fortunately, Nicholson seems to be an interesting fellow, one you might want to accompany on a good walk. His polished and lightly humorous essay style keeps things moving.

Some of the author's material comes from his own walks. I found his chapter on walking in Los Angles more compelling than those on New York and London, perhaps partly because walking in Los Angeles is not an activity that is often commended. It will help sustain your interest if you are at least vaguely familiar with his featured locations.

Nicholson also draws from literature, film, music, photography, and painting. A few of his choices may enhance your understanding or appreciation for walking; most likely will not. He writes in an ironic tone about several concept art endeavors that have involved walking, in some cases only marginally, at best.

There is a chapter on the accomplishments of several notable obsessive walkers, the kind whose achievements we might read about in a book of world records (I think it is to Nicholson's credit that he resisted entitling this chapter "Walking Feats"). Unless you are quite well-versed in this history of eccentric walkers already, you will probably be amused or astounded (or both) by at least a few of them.

The book includes a possibly useful bibliography. Nicholson provides the web address if you would like to view over 60 photos (of people, mostly) he has taken on his walks.

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