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epub Computational Physics download

by J. M. Thijssen

  • ISBN: 0521575885
  • Author: J. M. Thijssen
  • ePub ver: 1362 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1362 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 560
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (June 28, 1999)
  • Formats: doc rtf txt lrf
  • Category: Math
  • Subcategory: Physics
epub Computational Physics download

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This book describes computational methods used in theoretical physics with emphasis on condensed matter applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the wide variety of topics and algorithmic approaches studied in this book. The next chapters concentrate on electronic structure calculations, presenting the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional formalisms, and band structure methods. Later chapters discuss molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo methods in classical and quantum physics, with applications to condensed matter and particle field theories.

Computational Physics - A Practical Introduction to Computational Physics and Scientific Computing. The book is an introduction to the computational methods used in physics, but also in other. 97 MB·1,806 Downloads·New! The book is an introduction to the computational methods used in physics, but also in other. Load more similar PDF files. PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global issues facing the world today. Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away.

In Computational Physics, Thijssen has produced a book that is well suited to meeting these need. his book makes it easier to approach a new topic and encourages the reader to consider a modular approach when writing programs.

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Computional physics involves the use of computer calculations and simulations to solve physical problems. This book describes computational methods used in theoretical physics with emphasis on condensed matter applications.

Home Browse by Title Books Computational physics. Computational physicsJanuary 1999. Author: J. M. Thijssen. of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands. The range of possible topics in computational physics is vast and increases with every new issue of the journals. This book covers atomic and molecular physics, and the topics selected may be described as academic. For example, the self-consistent field theory of Hartree and Fock, which finds approximate electron distributions around complex atoms, is discussed together with alternative approaches due to Born and Oppenheimer.

It includes computational methods such as Monte Carlo and molec-ular dynamics, various electronic structure methodologies, methods for solving partial differential equations, and lattice gauge theory. Throughout the book, the relations between the methods used in different elds of physics are empha-sised. Subject to statutory exception and to the provisions of relevant collective licensing agreements

This book describes computational methods used in theoretical physics with emphasis on condensed matter applications

This book describes computational methods used in theoretical physics with emphasis on condensed matter applications. Computional physics involves the use of computer calculations and simulations to solve physical problems.

Computional physics involves the use of computer calculations and simulations to solve physical problems. This book describes computational methods used in theoretical physics with emphasis on condensed matter applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the wide variety of topics and algorithmic approaches studied in this book. The next chapters concentrate on electronic structure calculations, presenting the Hartree-Fock and Density Functional formalisms, and band structure methods. Later chapters discuss molecular dynamics simulations and Monte Carlo methods in classical and quantum physics, with applications to condensed matter and particle field theories. Each chapter details the necessary fundamentals, describes the formation of a sample program, and includes problems that address related analytical and numerical issues. Useful appendices on numerical methods and random number generators are also included. This volume bridges the gap between undergraduate physics and computational research. It is an ideal textbook for graduate students as well as a valuable reference for researchers.
Comments (7)

Felolune
Very fast service from UK.
Malanim
This book assumes an above average level of computing physics but it is definitely worth buying if youre doing DFT and similar. It gives you good exercises and hints for writing effective programs. It is challenging but worth the time I would say. I had a high level computing physics course and this book was a great reference both for DFT and Monte Carlo which I primarily used it for.
Joni_Dep
Ok, ok, my title seems a little aggressive, but trust me, if you are looking for a *computational physics* (C.P.) book, this is not a good choice. I have been lecturing an introductory computational physics course for two years, and, by far, the most adequate books I found (and use) were Giordano & Nakanishi and Landau & Páez ones. Dr. Thijssen's book is highly concentrated on condensed matter physics, and it has *too few* graphics, figures, or illustrations. In my sincere opinion, is by far the worst book on C.P. I have bought, and I do not recommend it, at least for those who want to learn C.P. "from scratch". Ok, ok, it can be considered a "high level" book (maybe adequate for graduate courses), but I think that it lacks the main points on "pure" C.P. The reason for the two stars is because I am a condensed matter physicist, and therefore the book will at least serve as an additional reference on this subject.
Dddasuk
Excellent
Yellow Judge
This book was assigned in a class I took on the computer modeling of materials. The text itself was slightly above my understanding; but thats fine, I just was not prepared for it. The problem is that there are many exercises that require the reader to download software from the author's web site, and use it to perform calculations. Many times the software did not work as intended, and so the professor had to spend time correcting the code, or writing his own version. And of course there were the usual problems of installing the code properly, compiling it, and executing it. This idea would have worked much better if the necessary code was put onto a CD-ROM that came packaged with the book. For the software problems I dock one star out of five.

The introduction states that this text is intended for graduate students in physics, chemistry, materials science, or electrical engineering, and who have taken classes in numerical analysis. I think a more appropriate wording is that this text is for someone versed in all of these listed fields. There is extensive use of thermodynamics, symmetry and crystal structure, linear algebra, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, etc... This book should not be used as an introductory guide to computational physics or related fields. The necessary prerequisite knowledge is quite extensive.

The intro should specify at least 2 college classes in computer programming as a prerequisite for this book. The programming assignments included at the end of each chapter are quite challenging, and should not be attempted by someone without previous experience in writing mathematical codes. This here lies another problem with the approach taken by this book. Most science and engineering majors will take 1-2 courses in programming as part of their university education, but these classes often emphasize business applications such as reading / writing to a text file, creating and using databases, formatting of screen output, linked lists, etc... These skills are not very useful in writing a code to do computations. For the latter, needed skills include parsing data, recognizing patterns, using built-in functions, importing and using algorithms from online libraries. utilizing large matrices and vectors, etc...

What the author should have done for each computational homework problem is to write out the solution (code) himself, add in the documentation, and then removed the code while leaving the documentation intact. The student can then use the documentation to craft his/her own solution.

For the difficulty of the computing problems, and of the text in general, I dock another star.

Therefore, I rate this book 3 out of 5 stars.
lubov
The only drawback of this book is the title. Too ordinary (and somewhat misguiding) for such a unique touch on the subject. This is a book on computational implementations of ab-initio calculation tools, not on numerical analysis or solving PDEs. I guess some of the low-rated comments reflects that the contents of this book is not well represented by the title 'Computational physics'.
This is as far as I know the only book that gives you the practical knowledge of how density functional theory or quantum Monte-Carlo works. If you feel devastated studying the theories behind quantum simulation program (which you are already using in practice), or need some guidance from the abstract knowledge of the theory to the practical implementation of them, this book is definitely one of the must-read.
Goltikree
I read several computational physics books before but never finished the second chapter. Most books on this subject expect the reader to become an expert after reading them, which is impossible! The authors themselves spent years to achieve their levels so they should have a practical expectation for the readers, especially undergraduates.

I am not saying Thijssen's book is easy. It's far from the truth. I am only saying that Thijssen knows about the reader's difficulty when reading this book and doing its exercises! He not only explains the physics problem but also illustrates the technique to do the computation.

Even though, this book is not for beginners, it's ideal for graduate students on experimental physics (students on theoretical physics need to know beyond this book). Also, it will save the read tons of time if he use Mathematica instead of C or Fortran for programming.

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