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epub Essential Elements (Atoms, Quarks and The Periodic Table) download

by Matt Tweed

  • ISBN: 0965465756
  • Author: Matt Tweed
  • ePub ver: 1932 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1932 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 58
  • Publisher: Walker and Company (2003)
  • Formats: docx txt rtf mbr
  • Category: Math
  • Subcategory: Chemistry
epub Essential Elements (Atoms, Quarks and The Periodic Table) download

I have just found that the 2003 book ‘Essential elements’ is now included as Book 3 in a much larger book . designed periodic table at the back! Really highly recommended for kids or for adults who need their science refreshing.

I have just found that the 2003 book ‘Essential elements’ is now included as Book 3 in a much larger book containing all the six smaller Wooden Books, each of which makes up a chapter of the 410-page book called ‘Sciencia’ published in 2011. The publishers have made corrections and I note that the new book has changed the former error from Thursday to Saturday. The erroneous paragraph about isotopes has been removed entirely.

Essential Elements book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks, and the Periodic Table as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Essential Elements' written by Matt Tweed introduces the reader to the complex and beautiful world of the particles everything around is us are made from. Mathemagical Ancient Wizdom.

A Wonderful Little Book! By Thriftbooks. com User, June 30, 2003.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks and the Periodic . item 2 Essential Elements by Matt Tweed -Essential Elements by Matt Tweed.

Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks and the Periodic Table by Matt Tweed (Paperback, 2007). Brand new: lowest price. The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable).

Let Matt Tweed take you on a lightning tour of things small, things invisible, and some things so minute and strange that no scientist is sure if they actually exist.

Items related to Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks and the Periodic. tweed-matt Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks and the Periodic Table (Mathemagical Ancient Wizdom). ISBN 13: 9781904263586. Essential Elements: Atoms, Quarks and the Periodic Table (Mathemagical Ancient Wizdom). About the Author: Matthew Tweed is a producer, mathematician, and illustrator.

Essential Elements: Atoms. has been added to your Basket. by M. Tweed (Author).

Tweed reveals the principal properties and interactions of substances familiar and unfamiliar. He explains atomic bonding, radioactivity, and DNA, and presents alternative ways of visualizing the periodic table, as well as a succinct synthesis of the Big Bang. Scientists and laymen alike will be entranced.

Atoms Elements Compounds Mixtures Read and Write As you read the chapter, list several everyday . Identify which are matter

Identify which are matter. 72 CHAPTER 3 Atoms, Elements, and the Periodic Table (l)Gary C. Will/Visuals Unlimited, (c)Mark Burnett/Stock Boston, (r)CORBIS Why is air matter, but light is not?

Comments (7)

Onaxan
Perfect Condition
iSlate
I think it was cancelled and I was notified, did not yet purchase, changed mind.
Brialelis
A review of ‘Essential elements: Atoms, quarks, and the periodic table’ by Matt Tweed

CITATION: Tweed, M. (2003). Essential elements: Atoms, quarks, and the periodic table. New York: Walker & Co (Wooden Books).

Reviewer: Dr W. P. Palmer

This is a very short book (58 pages), which attempts to cover the whole of chemistry, related to the nature of matter in this space. Anyone who has visited a large public or university library containing packed shelves of many meters of books about chemistry will clearly understand that the author has set himself an impossible task. Each topic is only one small page long (less than 300 words) with the following page consisting of a complex explanatory diagram.

The diagram on p. 3 has two Thursdays. One of these is probably meant to be a Saturday. On p.6, the term isotope is incorrectly defined: Tweed writes ‘Isotopes of the same element can have radically diverse chemical properties’. The first of these errors can be viewed as a misprint. The second error is a misunderstanding of basic chemistry that makes one worry about the book generally.

I have just found that the 2003 book ‘Essential elements’ is now included as Book 3 in a much larger book containing all the six smaller Wooden Books, each of which makes up a chapter of the 410-page book called ‘Sciencia’ published in 2011. The publishers have made corrections and I note that the new book has changed the former error from Thursday to Saturday. The erroneous paragraph about isotopes has been removed entirely.

I would thus suggest that anyone wanting to use this book, purchases the larger book called ‘Sciencia’, which has corrected errors that I noticed in the earlier book. There may well have been other errors that have now been corrected.

Generally, there are other features of the book that are novel. The style of diagrams is unusual and some readers may well like these as explaining difficult concepts. The book also goes further into the nature of matter than is usual in other chemistry books.

My suggestion is to purchase ‘Sciencia’ rather than ‘Essential elements’.

BILL PALMER
Wafi
Another delightful little tome by Wooden Books, that takes an immense and complicated subject and condenses it into 58 (really only 29 ,because half are illustrations)pages. It is done in such a way that anyone,regardless of their scientific education,will find it a fascinating journey into what science knows about how our world is made up.It is a great example of demonstrating how simplicity is the measure of genius.It takes terms ,concepts etc., that everyone has heard ,one time or another;as well as scientific terms that most have never heard and explains them in a way that shows how they all combine to make our world what it is.The complexity of our world is simply mindboggling and we can only wonder ,inspite of all the discoveries,how little we really know about everything--or as a matter of fact--about anything.Throughout history,mankind has always had a sense of wonder about the world around him;some actually believed they knew all the answers,but as the future continues,mankind continues to discover things that have never even been imagined.
Just imagine if ihe wisest men at the time ,say at the beginning of the 1st Century,sat around a table,with this book in their hands,how amazed they would have been to learn what was between its covers. Now,just think how a similar group would think how little we knew,if they were looking at a revised copy in the 30th Century.
Today; we wonder how the ancients built the Pyramids with knowing so little;will they wonder how we explored space ,with our present day knowledge?

How's this for demonstrating a point?

How big would the Earth be if it had no air between its atoms? About as big as a baseball...."Uncle John's 15th AHH- INSPIRING Bathroom Reader"..Page 299
Androrim
The book very briefly lists our current knowledge of the atomic world.

The issue I have is that for those who are even vaguely familiar with the subject already, the book provides no more knowledge. For those who are not familiar, they would albeit get to know about the terms used in Physics, but would gain no appreciation or true understanding of it. (In the sense that you learn that the Earth is round, but appreciating this fact requires understanding how mankind learned that, and what kind of surprise it was for them to learn this.)

Feynman once asked his father why the ball on the top of his toy truck moves backwards (with respect to the truck) if he pushes the truck forward. His father answered that nobody knows! He could have said that it is because of inertia blah blah. But that does not answer the question, it only gives new terminology to ask the same question all over again (what is inertia).

By telling Feynman that the answer is not known, his father developed his curiosity and simultaneously prevented him from developing biases.

This book gives you all the answers without making you appreciate how all that came about. Its doing exactly the opposite of what Feynman's father did to him.

By the way: I have read a few other books from the Wooden Books series. I usually love them.
Meri
This is a really fun book. It successfully manages to get across the massive amount of weirdness down in the smaller end of things. My sons love it. Some of the pictures are the best I've seen anywhere. A little bit of a pity it didn't go into bond angles and so organic chemistry (lack of space I guess), and, as another reviewer has noted, there are some weak places ... but I just love the feel of the book, the way the subjects have been handled, and, unlike so many 'popular' chemistry books, this one at least has a beautifully designed periodic table at the back! Really highly recommended for kids or for adults who need their science refreshing.

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