» » The Birds of South America: Volume 1: The Oscine Passerines

epub The Birds of South America: Volume 1: The Oscine Passerines download

by Tudor Guy,Robert S. Ridgely

  • ISBN: 0292707568
  • Author: Tudor Guy,Robert S. Ridgely
  • ePub ver: 1372 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1372 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 596
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press; 1st edition (June 1, 1989)
  • Formats: rtf txt lrf lrf
  • Category: Math
  • Subcategory: Biological Sciences
epub The Birds of South America: Volume 1:  The Oscine Passerines download

Back in the days, Robert Ridgely's and Guy Tudor's work was a major breakthrough

Back in the days, Robert Ridgely's and Guy Tudor's work was a major breakthrough. Before 1970, no reliable field guide to South American birds existed at all. Tongue in cheek, Ridgely says that he experienced some difficulty when trying to identify birds around Machu Picchu in Peru solely based on their Latin names! I suppose this gives an entirely new meaning to the expression anno dazumal.

The remaining volumes of The Birds of South America will be: Volume III: The Nonpasserines (Landbirds)Volume IV. .ROBERT S. RIDGELY, a leading ornithologist and author of A Guide to the Birds of Panama and The Birds of Ecuador, is Deputy Director of World Land Trust-US

The remaining volumes of The Birds of South America will be: Volume III: The Nonpasserines (Landbirds)Volume IV: The Nonpasserines (Waterbirds). No release date has been set for the remaining volumes. RIDGELY, a leading ornithologist and author of A Guide to the Birds of Panama and The Birds of Ecuador, is Deputy Director of World Land Trust-US. He has served on numerous boards, and currently is especially involved with Fundación Jocotoco in Ecuador, of which he is president.

A thorough resource on the oscine passerines of South America. Award of Merit in Design, Southern Books Competition, Southeastern Library Association Best Bird Book of the 20th Century Worldtwitch International. The Community Forests of Mexico. A Place in the Rain Forest. Birds of Tropical America. Back to top. University of Texas Press.

Birds are some of South America's treasures and also one of its most endangered resources. If the birds and other plants and animals of South America are to be saved, they must first be known and appreciated. The Birds of South America is a major step in that direction. Hence the need for a descriptive record of South American birds that will serve both professional and amateu A land of incredible natural resources, the South American continent is rich in plant and animal species. Among birds alone, over 3,100 species are either resident or migrant. Birds are some of South America's treasures and also one of its most endangered resources.

by Robert S. Ridgely; Guy Tudor. Published by University of Texas Press. Very good condition in a slightly better than very good dustwrapper. Jays and Swallows; Wrens, Thrushes and Allies; Vireos and Wood-warblers; Tanagers, Icterids, and Finches.

by Robert S. Red cloth, gilt title to spine and gilt vignette to front. Colour plates and b/w distribution maps. Corners bumped, text block slightly grubby. Tape marks to endpapers.

The remaining volumes of The Birds of South America will be: Volume III: The Nonpasserines (Landbirds) Volume .

The remaining volumes of The Birds of South America will be: Volume III: The Nonpasserines (Landbirds) Volume IV: The Nonpasserines (Waterbirds) No release date has been set for the remaining volumes. 31 color plates by Guy TUDOR. International shipping: Our base economy rate pays for a USPS Priority Mail flat-rate envelope. Hence the need for a descriptive record of South American birds that will serve both professional and amateur bird students and encourage conservation of these magnificent species

Birds are some of South America's treasures and also one of its most endangered resources.

Guy Tudor, Robert S. Ridgely. This is a single-volume guide to South American passerines, based on a two-volume work first published in 1989 and 1994.

a b c d Ridgely, Robert . Guy, Tudor (1989). The Birds of South America: Volume 1: The Oscine Passerines. ISBN 978-0-292-70756-6.

Winner, Award of Merit in Design, Southern Books Competition, Southeastern Library Association

A land of incredible natural resources, the South American continent is rich in plant and animal species. Among birds alone, over 3,100 species are either resident or migrant. Birds are some of South America's treasures and also one of its most endangered resources. Hence the need for a descriptive record of South American birds that will serve both professional and amateur bird students and encourage conservation of these magnificent species.

Although South American birds elicit much popular and scientific interest, they have never been completely or satisfactorily described and cataloged in a single, published source. The Birds of South America, projected to be a four-volume work, thus fills a critical void. Starting from a museum approach, the authors have examined specimens of each subspecies, comparing them visually and trying to discern the patterns in their plumage variation, both intra- and inter-specifically. They take a new look at bird systematics, reassessing relationships in light of new information. Perhaps most important, they combine this review and analysis with extensive field observations to give an accurate, incisive portrait of the birds in nature.

At a time when rapid development is devastating millions of acres of tropical habitat in South America, this record of an endangered resource becomes crucial. If the birds and other plants and animals of South America are to be saved, they must first be known and appreciated. The Birds of South America is a major step in that direction.

Volume I includes the Jays and Swallows; Wrens, Thrushes, and Allies; Vireos and Wood-warblers; Tanagers, Icterids, and Finches.

The remaining volumes of The Birds of South America will be:

Volume III: The Nonpasserines (Landbirds)Volume IV: The Nonpasserines (Waterbirds)

No release date has been set for the remaining volumes.

Comments (3)

Unereel
This a huge book, covering 750 passerine birds. There are only 440 illustrations in 31 plates. The whole book is mostly text. The descriptions are in detail, and the illustrations are excellent. I do not recommend it for the casual readers or bird photographers. The other book, Field Guide to the Songbirds of South America: The Passerines (Mildred Wyatt-Wold Series in Ornithology) by Robert S. Ridgely and Guy Tudor (Jul 15, 2009), may be a better alternative.
Madis
This really is a must for everyone who's seriously interested in South-American birds. The colour plates are up to Tudor's high standards. I even managed to identify some birds I saw 2 years ago. This surely was not due to the (poor) quality of my notes, but to the excellent quality of the plates.
The text is as clear as can be with good discription of the species, accompanied by clear distribution maps.
There are only two drawbacks:
- they did manage to illustrate "only" about 60% of the species (this cost them a star),
- we have to wait very long for the two remaining volumes.
Wal
The first of a planned four-volume set cataloging the incredibly diverse avifauna of South America. Ridgely and Tudor "departed from the traditional phylogenetic list sequence, commencing work with the passerine groups and not the nonpasserines (in other words, proceeding 'backwards')", explaining that in doing so they simply wanted "to first tackle the birds which needed attention the most". Regrettably, only this volume and the next (covering the suboscine passerines) were completed, and we can only hope that some intrepid souls will undertake a project of similar scope and depth covering the nonpasserines.

Only this volume (covering the oscine passerines) includes the well-written, informative introductory chapters covering habitats and biogeography; anyone contemplating a birding adventure in South America would be well-served by reading and rereading those chapters.

No one credibly doubts Robert Ridgely's placement among the foremost authorities on the bird life of tropical America, and especially of South America. In this volume he coherently and accessibly takes the reader through the taxonomic minefield that is the bird life of the oscine passerines of South America. He introduces each family with a brief but useful paragraph. He then similarly introduces each genus, and within each generic subchapter are found the species accounts for all birds associated with that genus (be prepared for numerous disclaimers related to ongoing taxonomic disputes).

The species accounts are rewarding and authoritative. Each account includes a section covering identification, followed by a reference to similar species with which the subject might be confused. Perhaps most useful is the section addressing habitat and behavior, summarizing in one place information previously scattered among dozens (hundreds?) of disparate resources (and including a healthy dose of information gleaned from the author's observations of many species). Finally, a written description of the South American range, including elevational distribution (in meters). That range description is supported in each account by a range map in which the species range is shaded in gray. It is after the range description that any taxonomic "footnote" is included.

Guy Tudor is ranked as one of the outstanding wildlife illustrators (he has also collaborated with Steven Hilty on guides to Colombia and Venezuela, to cite well-known examples). The plates in this volume certainly merit praise for their beauty, but perhaps more crucially for their accurate depictions of living birds (no small feat!). This reviewer has first-hand experience with only a small percentage of the birds found on the South American continent (and to date no experience in South America), but I find these few species illustrated faithfully.

It is true that the plates do not include illustrations of every species described in the text. The plates do include at least one member of each genus and of each group within large genera (excepting North American migrants, of which a "selection of common migrants has been included"). The plates portray any "range of variation within each genus or group", and preference is given to species which are "numerous or widespread, all other factors being equal, over those which are relatively scarce". Preference is given to species "found mainly or entirely in eastern or Southern South America; these tend to be less well known as compared with birds found in northern and western South America". And finally, Ridgely and Tudor wanted to "illustrate approximately two-thirds of the species within each (large) genus". They resolved "not to give short shrift to females, as so often is done".

It is inconceivable that any serious student of South American (or even tropical American) bird life would consider his or her library complete without this volume.

Related to The Birds of South America: Volume 1: The Oscine Passerines: