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by Tom Spanbauer

  • ISBN: 080213663X
  • Author: Tom Spanbauer
  • ePub ver: 1670 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1670 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 368
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reprint edition (January 6, 2000)
  • Formats: doc lrf rtf mobi
  • Category: LGBT
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
epub The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon: A Novel download

The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon is a 1991 novel by American author Tom Spanbauer set at the beginning of the 20th century.

The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon is a 1991 novel by American author Tom Spanbauer set at the beginning of the 20th century. Told primarily in flashback by its protagonist, a biracial Native American named Out-In-The-Shed ("Shed" for short), most of the action occurs in the late 19th century in the fictional town of Excellent, Idaho, as Shed grows up, learns about his parents, and falls in love. The work is Spanbauer's second novel.

Spanbauer, Tom. Publication date. Indians of North America. A Morgan Entrekin book. New York : Atlantic Monthly Press.

Unfortunately however, author Tom Spanbauer falls victim to many of the tropes of contemporary gay fiction and film

Unfortunately however, author Tom Spanbauer falls victim to many of the tropes of contemporary gay fiction and film.

Tom Spanbauer’s I Loved You More is the most important book on sexuality, love, and the lowdown of relationships that I have ever read. The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon is equal parts bizarre Bildungsroman, raucous picaresque, and hard-driving wild-West yarn. This book is not a love story. It guts the heart of the cliché love story and hands it back to you, beating. Love is the endless falling. LIDIA YUKNAVITCH, Author of Dora: A Headcase. The thing about Tom Spanbauer is – he is the real deal.

The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon is a beautifully told, mythic tale . Spanbauer: My fourth novel. Its working title is Now Is the Hour. It is set in Idaho in the sixties.

Here is what JT Leroy (author of Sarah) had to say about Tom Spanbauer's The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon: Jeff Walsh: Tom, thanks for doing this interview. Walsh: The Man Who Fell In Love With The Moon is a book that kept trying to find me, but I never let it in for some reason.

Tom Spanbauer is an American writer whose work often explores issues of sexuality, race, and the ties . Critics have also observed elements of magic realism in the novel. The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon was very well received when it was published in 1991.

Tom Spanbauer is an American writer whose work often explores issues of sexuality, race, and the ties that bind disparate people together. Raised in Idaho, Spanbauer has lived in Kenya and across the United States. He lives in Portland, Oregon, where he teaches a course titled dangerous writing. The Washington Post called it "amazing" and "dazzlingly accomplished" and The Oregonian said the novel "boldly creates a new voice from the Old West.

This may be the most remarkable novel I've ever read. M. panbauer is an excellent writer. He rendered some remarkable dialect flowing from Shed's mind. And one of the most original. That's when he meets Dellwood Barker, the Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon.

Set against the harsh reality of an unforgiving landscape and culture, The Man Who Fell in Love with. Written with his brilliant mastery of voice and detail and his wealth of wisdom and insight, Spanbauer’s saga of race, sexuality, cruelty, and humanity has deservedly become a true classic of Pacific Northwest fiction. Recommended By Gigi . Powells. Set against the harsh reality of an unforgiving landscape and culture, The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon provides a vision of the Old West unlike anything seen before.

Along the way he falls in love with Dellwood Barker, a. .Tom Spanbauer's wild west is the hurly burly of the mind.

Along the way he falls in love with Dellwood Barker, a man who talks to the moon and who may be Shed's father. He takes us into territories where few of us would ever dare to go" Publishers Weekly "This brave, original, ribald, funny, heartrending fable about the Old West.

Set against the harsh reality of an unforgiving landscape and culture, The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon provides a vision of the Old West unlike anything seen before. The narrator, Shed, is one of the most memorable characters in contemporary fiction: a half-Indian bisexual boy who lives and works at the Indian Head Hotel in the tiny town of Excellent, Idaho. It's the turn of the century, and the hotel carries on a prosperous business as the town's brothel. The eccentric characters working in the hotel provide Shed with a surrogate family, yet he finds in himself a growing need to learn the meaning of his Indian name, Duivichi-un-Dua, given to him by his mother, who was murdered when he was twelve. Setting off alone across the haunting plains, Shed goes in search of an identity among his true people, encountering a rich pageant of extraordinary characters along the way. Although he learns a great deal about the mysteries and traditions of his Indian heritage, it is not until Shed returns to Excellent and witnesses a series of brutal tragedies that he attains the wisdom that infuses this exceptional and captivating book.
Comments (7)

นℕĨĈტℝ₦
Although he authored two novels before this one, Tom Spanbauer created a non-forgettable set of characters in an exciting story about the Gold Rush years in a fictitious town in Idaho. It is a book about Ida Richilieu, her native american helper named Shed, Alma Hatch, and Dellwood Barker. They have to deal with people that can't spell, Mormons taking the town over, cold, and other crazy things. Trust me, one reading will hook you with this author for the rest of time.
Zan
"The Man Who Fell In Love With The Moon" is like no other book I've ever read. Spanbauer is a fabulous storyteller! He does something magical on the pages as he brings his characters and scenes to life. The book's unique perspective of the Old West is fascinating. Yes, his characters are flawed and sometimes behave in ways that made me uncomfortable, but that's part of what makes the book so interesting. I read a review where the reader gave the book a low rating in part because she thought the mother was such a terrible person. I love when fiction offers "terrible people" and presents their stories so thoroughly that we might understand why they did what they did. I love a true exploration of human nature, not a safe, ideal presentation. Spanbauer doesn't hold back with his characters. He shows the ugly, the beautiful, the unspoken and the outrageous, creating a story so raw and honest, it's hard not to get caught up in his bizarre world. I opened my mind, stepped outside of myself, and just took in the experience. Every day I looked forward to picking up the book as I had no idea what to expect next! This is a most memorable and thought-provoking read.
Goltizuru
Wow, what an incredibly trippy ride through the Wild West! Set primarily in the gold mining town of Excellent, Idaho during the early 1900's, this novel is filled with adventure and history, magic and adventure, love and debauchery, philosophy and religion. "The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon" is one of the more creatively imagined novels that I've come across recently. At its core is the coming of age story of the main character and narrator Shed, whose quest for a fuller understanding of self leads him on an odyssey that ends, as many do, exactly where it started. In the telling of this story, Spanbauer reinforces the idea that it's rarely the destination but the journey that transforms. Populated with characters both loveable and detestable the novel intertwines each character's story in a way that allows for an exploration of Native American beliefs, frontier values and the human debris that results when the two collide.

It's also a story about the importance of stories; "You can't stop people from talking" - explains Ida, the novel's heroine - "They talk and pretty soon you got a story, and what's a human being without a story?" "The Man Who Fell in Love with the Moon" is not for the faint of heart. It can be seen as modern day ribald in the tradition of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales or an insightful philosophical debate on the nature of the human soul, or both. Vices and virtues intersect in this novel in ways that are at once shocking and enlightening. So get ready for a wild ride on this airship in route to a visit with the man in the moon. These are stories that are comforting and unsettling, familiar and eye opening. But, "you got to consider the source", cautions Ida, "a story about a crazy man, told by crazy people should only make you wonder." Kudos to Spanbauer for superb execution and many thanks to Dave M. for this recommendation. Enjoy!
Tygralbine
What a fantastic book! It grabbed me from the first sentence and its grip only tightened. During the last 50 pages I was crying my eyes continually, at times laughing, sometimes reeling and gasping from the brutality and sadness, but above all the deep truth of the story. I can't remember when I cried so much while reading a novel! As far as I know, this novel is sui generis and quite unique. It is as though you looked right into the soul of the man "Shed." One thing I must denigrate is the slaughterhouse scene. It seemed a little too gratuitiously yucky for effect, to make a point. That part was the toughest to get through and it reminded me of the horrifyingly gray world of "Gorgemghast." But overall, what a book! Phew! I feel just like I took a vacation in Idaho of the 1880s.
Danrad
First I belong to a bookgroup that has met every month for the last 15 years. This is one of only two books we have read twice. And we are a picky bunch of smart people. :-)

When I read the reviews here, again, tears are in my eyes, again. There was once an audio version of this book that I almost got killed while listening to because my tears made it impossible to see the road at one point. On the other hand there are so many parts of the book that make a man laugh out loud.

It is a tale of sexuality, race, America, religion, passion, cruelty, gender, meaning, and life like no other novel I have ever read. As a voracious and consistent reader of way too much education this novel stands like the first wonder of the literary landscape in my soul.

For the new reader: one reviewer "gave up" at a bit into the book. It MUST be appreciated as an oral novel. If you don't read it aloud to yourself you need to let Shed speak into your head as a talking person rather than as words on a page or any other type of narrator. This IS an aural novel.

The sex is graphic and wonderful, the passions unequalled, the pain intense, the joy is palpable, and the influence on a person is permanent after reading this novel.

I loved Brokeback Mountain and love its author all the time, "The Shipping News" is amazing. But the reviewer who said this surpassed Brokeback mountain wasn't saying enough since this is a novel of grand visions of life.

Normally I am somewhat articulate. "The Man Who Fell In Love With The Moon" trancends articulation and leaves me with only the ability to provide pictures of the shadow of what Spanbauer accomplishes in this grand American novel.

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