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by Isabel L. Taube

  • ISBN: 1907804080
  • Author: Isabel L. Taube
  • ePub ver: 1277 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1277 kb
  • Rating: 4.6 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 224
  • Publisher: GILES; n edition (September 14, 2012)
  • Formats: lrf txt azw mbr
  • Category: Hobbies
  • Subcategory: Home Improvement & Design
epub Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay download

Isabel L. Taube, PhD an art historian at the School of Visual Arts, New York, is a specialist in 19th-century American .

Isabel L. Taube, PhD an art historian at the School of Visual Arts, New York, is a specialist in 19th-century American painting and a frequent contributor to the online journal 'Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide'.

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Walter Gay (1856 -1937) was a highly accomplished artist, collector and tastemaker. ISBN13:9781907804083.

Impressions of Interiors. Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay. Boards. By Isabel L. Taube,Sarah J. Hall. Guest exhibition curator Isabel L. Taube teaches art history at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the School of Visual Arts in New York. Contributors Tracy L. Kamerer. Fig 1: Walter Gay (1856–1937)’ The Artist’s Study, rue de l’Université, ca. 1910 Oil on wood panel, 16 12¾ inches Private collection Courtesy of Jill Newhouse Gallery. Sarah J. Hall is the director of curatorial affairs at the Frick Art & Historical Center in Pittsburgh, Penn. Tracy L. Kamerer is the chief curator at the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, Palm Beach, Fla.

Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay, which recently opened at the Frick Art & Historical Center in Pittsburgh, includes dozens of paintings by the American expatriate artist, who spent much of his life in France, swanning in and out of the finer châteaus an. .

Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay, which recently opened at the Frick Art & Historical Center in Pittsburgh, includes dozens of paintings by the American expatriate artist, who spent much of his life in France, swanning in and out of the finer châteaus and hôtels particuliers and capturing their boiseried glories on paper and canvas

Discover ideas about Interior Rendering. June 2019 In 1876 the couple moved to Paris, France where Walter Gay became a pupil of Leon Bonnat.

Discover ideas about Interior Rendering. In 1876 the couple moved to Paris, France where Walter Gay became a pupil of Leon Bonnat. They lived in an apartment on the Left Bank and in 1907 purchased Chateau Le Bréau on a 300-acre (. km2) walled park near the Forest. Find this Pin and more on Walter Gay by Iris Iris.

Walter Gay (January 22, 1856 – July 13, 1937) was an American painter noted both for his genre paintings of French peasants, paintings of opulent interior scenes and was a notable art collector. Walter Gay was born on January 22, 1856 in Hingham, Massachusetts into an established New England family. He was the son of Ebenezer and Ellen Blake (née Blood) Gay. His uncle was the Boston painter Winckworth Allan Gay, who introduced the young man to the art community.

Walter Gay was well known at the beginning of the 20th century for his painterly views of.Panelists include guest curator Isabel Taube, author of th.

Walter Gay was well known at the beginning of the 20th century for his painterly views of beautifully appointed residential interiors. Comprising 69 paintings and works on paper by Walter Gay, as well as a selection of ancillary historical material from 40 public and private collections, Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay will debut at The Frick Art Museum in Pittsburgh, before traveling to the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, Florida, where it will be on view from January

La Robertsau by Walter Gay - Reproduction Oil Painting

La Robertsau by Walter Gay - Reproduction Oil Painting. It's About Time: Interiors by American in Paris Walter Gay. Home Decorators Lighting Collection Key: 5219566355. Do It Yourself Home Decorations. In the midst of all of the blockbuster fall book releases, there is one book that I hope will not be overlooked. Titled Impressions of I. William McGregor Paxton the Letter - Bing Images. Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay. Paintings and rendering of interiors have elements of magic and wonder, a special quality and personality that even photographs by accomplished artists will never measure to or should ever replace.

Taube, Isabel . et al. London: Giles, 2012. Walter Gay, 81, American Painter: Dean of Group in Paris Passed Entire Career in France Dies at Chateau du Breau. Scope and Content Note. The bulk of the Walter and Matilda Gay Collection is formed by the diaries of Matilda Gay found in Series I: Diaries.

Presenting 70 works from public and private collections, this beautifully illustrated volume offers the opportunity to re-evaluate the American artist Walter Gay’s depiction of “empty” rooms, filled with furniture but with no human presence. Walter Gay (1856 -1937) was a highly accomplished artist, collector and tastemaker. He and his wife Matilda lived in Paris for much of their life and enjoyed a leading role in stylish society; many of the interiors that he painted, with their 18th-century French furnishings, were rooms in their own homes, or those of friends.Awarded a gold medal at the Paris Salon in 1888, it is the poetic rooms that form the basis of Gay’s legacy. Three essays explore his career, his reputation within the art market, his place in the history of American collecting; and the importance of interior decoration to Walter and Matilda Gay, along with the influence of leading contemporaries such as Edith Wharton. This new title has a strong appeal beyond art lovers to include interior designers and decorators, as well as architects and those in architectural conservation.The “go-to” volume on the work of Walter Gay, it fills a yawning gulf in published scholarship on the artist.
Comments (7)

Akinonris
this is a gift, but it looks like what she wants
EXIBUZYW
Wonderful
Amis
Lovely book
Andronrad
Such an amazing man and life.
Querlaca
Let me place this review in its proper context. I became interest in the history of interior decoration after reading Mario Praz's An Illustrated History of Interior Decoration. I eventually went on, for pure enjoyment, to purchase works by Peter Thornton and Charlotte Gere (among others). Mr. Gay himself wrote that he wished his work to reflect "the spirit of empty rooms." Indeed, the rooms Gay painted are not only imbued with the past, they also represent how its current occupants (circa early 20th century) refashioned the past to reflect their own ideals. Mr Gay himself, as the text states, would insert an object when he thought the original lacked a certain unity or contradicted his own vision. So, Gay's works are multidimensional. They reflect an historical past and an evolution toward the present as each successive generation makes their mark. It is fascinating to understand how even the rearrangement of the furniture or the addition or sale of this or that piece can reflect a great deal about the historical process. It also represents Gay's own place in time - the selection of a particular angle to the exclusion of other aspects, the insertion of elements that were not in situ, and even the underlying reverence which propelled the artists to depict a certain room. I am a CPA. I rely upon text to explain the significance of these things. I think it would have enhanced the appreciation and understanding of the works presented in this volume if these aspects had been explored. This can be done succinctly, and in a lively and witty manner as Praz did so wonderfully (even in translation). The text in this volume provides little. As a general rule, the description provides only a summary of the artist's occupation of a place, occasionally that of the owners, and a little about about how Mr. or Mrs. Gay eschewed or revered this or that element of the interior. The rooms do not come to life. They are static and lifeless forms. The text does not inform me how the elements of a whole mise-en-scen excited both the original possessors and their subsequent caretakers. Each of Gay's interiors evokes a history and it is this history which makes the object within them come alive. If I wished for a biography of the Gays, I would have purchased one. One does exist. Even for an exhibition catalog, this quite misses the mark. Like a mummified artefact, it will sit on my shelf unopened and unread with an artist's vision and his whole world lost to the mists of the time. Very disappointing.
Mikarr
Love this book and I particularly love paintings of interiors. A very talented artist and I highly recommend this book to lovers of interiors.
Welen
We just saw this marvelous show at the Flagler Museum in Palm Beach. Sure we were in a good mood already, having just gone to Testa's to have their legendary she-crab soup and the their great Crunchy Catch. But this show was so ravishing for the utter beauty of the paintings, that it really surprised. I really was not familiar with Walter Gay's works, and what I could see online did not convey what these intense paintings are really like. What they are like, to my eyes, is something similar in effect Dutch "Pronk" Still Lives. That is, they are not just pretty, and have something of the brilliant severity of vision of those Pronk works. Yet, let's be clear, the intensity is all close to the surface. What they do not convey in the least is any really existential sense of anything.

The text that I was able to read briefly was very informative on the genesis of Gay's style. But it seemed to want, especially at the end, to make them something they clearly are not. the last few paragraphs actually try to compare these works with Demuth's iconic Figure 5 painting, by way of some forced analogy. And then, these works are compared to Sargent's incredible painting of the Boit daughters. Only because, it seems, there are big Chinese urns in the painting as well. Well, first of all, it is uncharitable to this fine artist to compare him to a vastly greater artist like Sargent, and in one of his greatest works no less. Second, the Sargent canvas, like Chase's Hide and Seek at the Phillips, has a truly different mien, reaching back to Velazquez and even perhaps Sanchez Cotan. By contrast, what is amazing about Gay's works is that they are like a heady, sober and genius intensification of the ever-familiar and pleasurable tropes of standard "Sunday painters". But used for a very savvy and clever purpose, such that it never cloys.

Still the book is very attractive, and most of the text very instructive on why these works are so fine. The most amazing thing about the show, in the end, was that with so many paintings, of all the same type, they never grew dull. That in itself is something very special for works like this.

Lastly, I was a bit wistful to see that the Flagler Museum has finally accepted apparently what some of us always knew. One of my favorite artists is Vernet, and though I always found their "Vernet" canvas very charming, it had about as much chance of really being by Vernet as a snowball on the top of the Flagler Museum. I was not surprised to see that the little plaque with Vernet's name on it had disappeared.

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