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epub The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium (Charnwood Library) download

by Danny Danziger,Robert Lacey

  • ISBN: 0708991459
  • Author: Danny Danziger,Robert Lacey
  • ePub ver: 1774 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1774 kb
  • Rating: 4.5 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 248
  • Publisher: Charnwood (Large Print); Large Print Ed edition (March 1, 2000)
  • Formats: docx mbr doc azw
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: World
epub The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium (Charnwood Library) download

Welcome to the Year 1000. This is What Life was Like

Welcome to the Year 1000. This is What Life was Like. Written after ‘The Year 1000’ written by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger – a combination of a historian and a journalist – is a time travel back to the Anglo-Saxon England of 1000 ., offering the reader a unique opportunity to inspect and experience its daily life.

Welcome to the year 1000. The book chapters and topics are set up to correspond to the months of the year, detailing what life was life was like during that time and in particular that month. For example, March was the beginning of spring and the equinox, what did they inherit from the Romans, Vikings, and Anglo-Saxons besides the names of the towns and their calendar.

Lacey, Robert, author; Danziger, Danny, author. Includes bibliographical references (pages 207-213) and index. Presents what life was like in the year 1000 for an Englishman. The Julius work calendar : the wonder of survival - January : for all the saints - February : welcome to Engla-lond - March : heads for food - April : feasting - May : wealth and wool - June : life in town - July : the hungry gap - August : remedies - September : pagans and pannage - October

The turn of the millennium (the last millennium, that is) in. .

The turn of the millennium (the last millennium, that is) in England was an interesting world to behold - the country was struggling toward unity, but still wary of invaders from across the various seas (an invasion trend that would stop less than 100 years after the turn of the millennium). Robert Lacey & Danny Danziger put Middle Ages England into easily comprehensible context for me with a few centurys' background history of the Anglo Saxon and Welsh peoples, then filled in the details that brought them to life, so to speak.

In the year 1000 the world was one in of people who feared an apocalypse and people who had no idea what year it was or what lay beyond the nearest valley. Narrated through the progression of the seasons, this book presents a recreation of English life at the end of the first millennium AD. Product Identifiers.

Lacey, Robert & Danziger, Danny. Published by Little Brown. Condition: Good Soft cover. View all copies of this book. Price: US$ 9. 5 Convert Currency. Shipping: US$ . 0 Within . Destination, rates & speeds. verified user30 Day Return Policy. Bookseller Inventory KHB-54710.

Robert Lacey, Danny Danziger. The Year 1000 : What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Year 1000 : What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium from your list? The Year 1000 : What Life Was Like At the Turn of the First Millennium.

What daily life was like for an Englishman at the turn of the last . An excerpt from "The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium: An Englishman's World" by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger

What daily life was like for an Englishman at the turn of the last millennium. An excerpt from "The Year 1000: What Life Was Like at the Turn of the First Millennium: An Englishman's World" by Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger. Jump to: 1 (Daily Life) 2 (The Calendar) 3 (The Saints) 4 (Saints' Relics).

In the year 1000 the world was one of mystery and magicians, monks, warriors and wandering merchants - people who .

In the year 1000 the world was one of mystery and magicians, monks, warriors and wandering merchants - people who feared an apocalypse and people who had idea what year it was or what lay beyond the nearest valley. It was a world of dark forests and Viking adventures in which fear was real and death a constant companion. People felt they walked hand-in-hand with God, and envisaged him so literally that even Christians were sometimes buried with supplies for the journey to the new life in heaven

Robert Lacey (author), Danny Danziger (author) Thoroughly enjoyable.

Robert Lacey (author), Danny Danziger (author). These are portents of the future, and THE YEAR 1000 finishes by examining the human and social ingredients that were to make for survival and success in the next thousand years. Thoroughly enjoyable. a quirky and engaging.

The Year 1000 is a vivid and surprising portrait of life in England a thousand years ago - a world that already knew brain surgeons and property developers and, yes, even the occasional gossip columnist. Uncovering such wonderfully unexpected details, authors Robert Lacey and Danny Danziger bring this distant world closer than it has ever been before. How did people survive without sugar? How did monks communicate if they were not allowed to speak? Why was July called "the hungry month"? The Year 1000 answers these questions and reveals such secrets as the recipe for a medieval form of Viagra and a hallucinogenic treat called "crazy bread." In the spirit of modern investigative journalism, Lacey and Danziger interviewed the top historians and archaeologists. Research led them to an ancient and little-known document of the period, the Julius Work Calendar, a sharply observed guide that takes us back in time to a charming and very human world of kings and revelers, saints and slave laborers, lingering paganism and profound Christian faith.
Comments (7)

Kale
If I were born in England in the year 1000 I would be a farmer because that was the default occupation in those days. With famines ever lurking, food was the issue for most people. And if I had no land to farm I would have to submit myself to a landowner, voluntarily, to be a slave. Because the only alternative was starvation. Mine would be a short life of hard labor and exposure, for others. I would try to keep warm in winter by burning wood or dung, if I could get them. And I might have fleas or worms.

I would not be able to read or write, but could communicate orally in English, such as it was then. I could not afford to own even one book. I would have only one name, no surname. I would live by saints’ days and the church calendar, like the neighbors. I would know nothing of the world beyond a few miles of my home, but would live in fear of invasion by armies of thugs. And I would have to behave myself, lest I be mistaken for the Antichrist who was expected to arrive with the millennium. Typically, there was a gallows on the edge of town. Such was England, or Engla-lond, in the year 1000.

This book is a fascinating glimpse into the past, derived from contemporary documents such as the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, the Julius Work Calendar, monastic rules, wills and legal documents, even bawdy jokes and poems. Plus archaeological findings. It makes me appreciate the comforts I have now, but it was not all bad then. Their world was quiet, unpolluted, and not overpopulated.
Yalone
The book chapters and topics are set up to correspond to the months of the year, detailing what life was life was like during that time and in particular that month. For example, March was the beginning of spring and the equinox, what did they inherit from the Romans, Vikings, and Anglo-Saxons besides the names of the towns and their calendar. July was hay month and goes into harvesting the crops, the weather, and how the monks not only prayed but carried out certain agricultural tasks themselves. December talks about the breaking with the past and beginning anew.

Overall I enjoyed the book, it was not too heavy but such is its design. It was written to ‘ask the questions about everyday life and habits that conventional history books often ignore…’ It paints a picture in one’s mind by merely giving the reader a feel for the time not a starched compilation of tedious facts. As a history buff, I found it a light yet interesting read. If you are looking for a more thorough historical chronicling of the time, this is not the book for you.
Legionstatic
At one time or another growing up, most of us have thought how it would have been to live in a castle or be able to travel back to an earlier time. Samuel Clemens, known to many as Mark Twain, created “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” with that theme in mind.

Many readers recall doomsday soothsayers of the late twentieth century and their predictions of mass electrical outages, food shortages as the time turned from Dec.31, 1999 to Jan.1, 2000. fears from our increasing dependency on computers. Others pointed to scriptural passages from the “Bible” or other traditions predicting the beginning of the end of the world.In the year 999, there were predictions and fears as well. Most of the populous Illiterate, relying on religious leaders to guide but often scared them by warning what was to come for as the end of time drew near.

Plagues were a constant threat, as were invasions from the several directions on hamlets living throughout this island. Life itself was tenuous and often brief. Starvation an ever present threat. Many infants didn’t survive beyond their first year. Sanitation, water purification, illness prevention were over 900 in the future. Life was rough, shelter was primitive, weather harsh, and often what attempts that were thought to cure, most often made medical conditions worse.

The land we know of today as Great Britain, most difficult month for starving to deathwas July! Because of its agrarian culture, the first of two harvests was preserved for their most precious possessions, farm animals. throughout the cold months. The second
harvest was for humans. it was this planting which was often destroyed or not as abundant as the first.

Invaders took food, killed or enslaved the young and hardiest of the population in a hamlet and demanded possessions. Attempts to gather under the lord or one who owned the land on which peasants worked was the only option for survival.

The authors of done exhaustive research; the result is a highly informative book.It includes word derivation language changed over centuries. Most fascinating was English cultural history as invasion and tradition altered the landscape and the conquered people who adapted what they were forced to adopt.

I hope you’ll take time to read this enchanting book and absorb information found in it. After all, we Americans share its common language, though we too have very much adapted what we’ve adopted.

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