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by Philip Rousseau

  • ISBN: 0520219597
  • Author: Philip Rousseau
  • ePub ver: 1341 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1341 kb
  • Rating: 4.7 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 250
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (July 6, 1999)
  • Formats: azw rtf lrf lit
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: World
epub Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt (Transformation of the Classical Heritage) download

The Transformation of the Classical Heritage, . Berkeley, Los Angeles, and London: University of California Press, 1985. Pp. xvi, 217; 2 maps, 1 figure.

The Transformation of the Classical Heritage, .

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Philip Rousseau, Pachomius: the Making of a Community in Fourth-century Egypt (The transformation of the classical heritage VI). Berkeley, et. University of California Press, 1985. xvi + 217, 2 maps. Samuel N. C. Lieu (a1). University of Warwick.

He is the author of Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt (California, 1985). Series: Transformation of the Classical Heritage (Book 20). Paperback: 432 pages. Publisher: University of California Press (February 11, 1998). This is the must-read biography of St. Basil. It focuses more on his life and the history of the times than the nuances of his doctrinal teaching. If you're only interested in his theology, read Andrew Radde-Gallwitz's book (Basil of Caesarea: A Guide to His Life and Doctrine) instead.

Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt, by Philip Rousseau VI. They have lacked neither sources nor knowledge of the historical context. Nevertheless the dispute remains puzzling for its intensity and its duration.

Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt, by Philip Rousseau VII. Change in Byzantine Culture in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries, by A. P. Kazhdan and Ann Wharton Epstein VIII. The Christological dispute began, like many religious conflicts, with the discovery of differences among allies.

Pachomius created the community or cenobitic organization, in which male or female monastics lived together and held their property . Philip Rousseau (University of California Press, Berkeley 1985), Pachomius: the Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt, p. 4–75.

Pachomius created the community or cenobitic organization, in which male or female monastics lived together and held their property in common under the leadership of an abbot or abbess. Pachomius realized that some men, acquainted only with the eremitical life, might speedily become disgusted if the distracting cares of the cenobitical life were thrust too abruptly upon them. Crum, Walter Ewing (1939).

Pachomius, who died in 346, has long been regarded as the "founder of monasticism.

Philip Rousseau," Classical Philology 83, no. 4 (Oc. 1988): 377-379. The Pupula Duplex and Other Tokens of an "Evil Eye" in the Light of Ophthalmology. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Carthage and Rome: Introduction. The Omen of Sneezing. The Date of Composition of Caesar's Gallic War. Radin. Hercules, Mummius, and the Roman Triumph in Aeneid 8. Loar.

Transformation of the classical heritage ; 6. Bibliography, etc. Note . Geographic Name: Egypt Church history. Uniform Title: Transformation of the classical heritage ; 6.

Pachomius was born into a pagan family in Upper Egypt in the late 3rd . Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt.

Pachomius was born into a pagan family in Upper Egypt in the late 3rd century. Though ethnically Coptic, his writings show that he was competent in both Coptic and Greek. This book introduces the literature of early Christian monasticism, examining all the best-known works, including Athanasius' Life of Antony, the Lives of Pachomius, and the Sayings of the Fathers (Apophthegmata Patrum). Later chapters focus on two pioneers of monastic theology: Evagrius Ponticus, the first great theoretician of Christian mysticism; and John Cassian, who brought Egyptian monasticism to the Latin West.

Pachomius, who died in 346, has long been regarded as the "founder of monasticism." Available again, Philip Rousseau's careful reading of the available texts reveals that Pachomius's pioneering enterprise has been consistently misread in light of later monastic practices. Rousseau not only provides a fuller and more accurate portrait of this great teacher and spiritual director but also gives a new perspective on the development of monasticism. In a new preface Rousseau reviews the scholarly developments that have modified his views and emphases since the book was published. The result is to make Pachomius an even less assured pioneer, a man likely to have been more involved in the village and urban society of his time than previously thought.
Comments (3)

Mananara
Hard to find book.....Great condition accurate description. Thank you!
Moonshaper
Distinguished Professor Philip Rousseau's book "Pachomius: The Making of a Community in Fourth-Century Egypt" is 217 pages long and has 9 chapters, 2 maps, 1 figure, and some front and back matter. Chapter headings are: 1. Egypt, 2. The Sources, 3. Forming the Community, 4. The Day's Routine, 5. Living under Rule, 6. Leadership and Responsibility, 7. The Ascetic Goal, 8. Monastery and World, and 9. Continuity.

From a scholastic viewpoint, there is a depth and breadth in the book that only a scholar can bring as evidenced by the quantity of footnotes and bibliographical material included. He is intimately familiar with the primary sources and often inserts the original Greek term or phrase, so the reader can judge it themselves. The broad sweep of the book includes assessing the sociological, economic, and religious context in which the Pachomian communities took root, through to Pachomius's life and work, and then beyond Pachomius to the next generation of leadership. Rousseau is deliberately cautious about many of his conclusions and willing to augment his views based on new research, as his preface to the paperback edition shows.

From a narrative viewpoint, I enjoyed reading this very much. I was intrigued by the ways in which Pachomius displayed doubt and fear in the midst of successfully leading his communities. I was interested in the manner in which the communities were organized internally and the way they interacted with the outside world. It was fascinating to learn about how the Pachomians may or may not have regarded the beliefs and practices of the Gnostics, Manichees, and Melitians in Egypt, and whether there was any overlap between these movements and groups. And it was interesting to read about the ebb and flow of leadership transitions of the communities after Pachomius, especially about how Theodore and Horsiesios unofficially shared leadership.

From a stylistic viewpoint, it is generally a readable book, but is not well suited to a popular audience of non-specialists. Sometimes it is tedious to read because of the frequent use of subjective clauses and unnecessary details that do not add much to the discussion at hand.

Overall, this was a very satisfying read. There are practical lessons from this book that I hope to carry over into my own current role in helping to catalyze, coach, and connect the modern-day house church movement.

RAD ZDERO, author of LETTERS TO THE HOUSE CHURCH MOVEMENT and THE GLOBAL HOUSE CHURCH MOVEMENT
Shaktit
Rousseau traces the life of the man who founded the first Christian monastic community, bringing his motives and struggles down to the level of step by step, trial and error experience. He introduces an Egyptian man who served as a soldier in the Roman occupation army, and was moved to see local Christians offering food to the troops. Rousseau is concerned with practical details. Like how Pachomius and his followers started out working as field labourers by day, and experimented with prayer and meditation by night. The book explores each issue in managing a community or its spiritual trials, as those issues appeared and as the monks chose to deal with them. Later the very success of the experiment generated growing controversy, as when Archbishop Athanasius came down from Alexandria to the desert, seeking Pachomius' support in a church power struggle. And Pachomius "hid from the pope", taking the guise of a common monk, till Athanasius went away.

As Rousseau shows, Pachomius hoped his monks would avoid being co-opted as functionaries of the imperial church. He feared that with a rise of institutional overlords, "good men will no longer feel able to speak out for the benefit of the community, but will remain silent and still". For Pachomius, ambition for control over others was an immaturity to be overcome. He openly confessed and ridiculed his own craving for superiority, admitting that he sometimes imagined himself preceded by a voice calling "Make way for the man of God!".

I found the book very good in raising questions about how I manage my life, and how I make my own lifetime a spiritual adventure.

--author of Correcting Jesus

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