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epub Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora: From Alexander to Trajan (323 BCE–117 CE) download

by John M. G. Barclay

  • ISBN: 0520218434
  • Author: John M. G. Barclay
  • ePub ver: 1409 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1409 kb
  • Rating: 4.1 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 544
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First Edition Thus edition (February 15, 1999)
  • Formats: rtf lit rtf azw
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: World
epub Jews in the Mediterranean Diaspora: From Alexander to Trajan (323 BCE–117 CE) download

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Most studies of Jews in the period from Alexander to Trajan have concentrated almost exclusively on Jerusalem and Judea. This is a superb book which has lifted our discussion of Jews in the Diaspora to a new plane

Most studies of Jews in the period from Alexander to Trajan have concentrated almost exclusively on Jerusalem and Judea. This is a superb book which has lifted our discussion of Jews in the Diaspora to a new plane. Since understanding the Diaspora is vital to comprehending a good deal about early Christianity, Barclay has also made a significant contribution to this latter field of investigation. -Paul Trebilco, University of Otago.

Uniquely, it combines a study of all the important Jewish communities with a thorough examination of the Diaspora literature as a whole. An important reference for all scholars and students with an interest in Second Temple Judaism, Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity.

In this book, John Barclay assembles and analyzes evidence about the Jewish communities in Egypt, Syria, Cyrenaica .

In this book, John Barclay assembles and analyzes evidence about the Jewish communities in Egypt, Syria, Cyrenaica, Rome, and Asia. Barclay's ambitious goal is to describe, as precisely as the evidence allows, the varying levels of assimilation and. Most studies of Jews in the period from Alexander to Trajan have concentrated almost exclusively on Jerusalem and Judea. In this book, John Barclay assembles and analyzes evidence about the Jewish communities in Egypt, Syria, Cyrenaica, Rome, and Asia.

to Trajan (323 BCE - 117 CE), Edinburgh: T&T Clark, 1996.

-, Negotiating Diaspora: Jewish Strategies in the Roman Empire, Library of Second Temple studies 45, London: T & T Clark International, 2004. Bartlett, J. Jews in the Hellenistic World. Josephus, Aristeas, the Sibylline Oracles, Eupolemus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985. Beard, . North, . Price, S, Religions of Rome, vol. 1, A History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998

Louis H. Feldman,Jew and Gentile in the Ancient World: Attitudes and Interactions from Alexander to Justinian (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993) 6. oogle Scholar.

Authors and affiliations. Louis H. 2. Cf. Victor A. Tcherikover et a. Corpus Papyrorum Judaicarum, Vol. 3 (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1964) 43–87.

Part Two (Chapters 8-13) combines the other four Diaspora locations because of the relative paucity of data outside Egypt, though it does treat these centers separately before offering a synthesis. In Part Three (Chapter 14) Barclay draws general conclusions about the ethnic bond, social and symbolic resources, and practical distinctions that bound Diaspora Jews together and enabled them to maintain coherent and enduring communities.

xvi, 522 pp. Martha Himmelfarb (a1).

Most studies of Jews in the period from Alexander to Trajan have concentrated almost exclusively on Jerusalem and Judea. In this book, John Barclay assembles and analyzes evidence about the Jewish communities in Egypt, Syria, Cyrenaica, Rome, and Asia. Barclay's ambitious goal is to describe, as precisely as the evidence allows, the varying levels of assimilation and antagonism between Jews and the non-Jewish communities in these areas for this 440-year period. With a concluding review of Jewish identity in the Diaspora as a whole, this book provides our first comprehensive and multi-faceted survey of Diaspora communities and Diaspora literature.
Comments (4)

Erennge
This book is awesome. This was one of the first scholarly books that I have read on the topic of early 2nd Temple Judaism as concerns social assimilation. Barclay goes into much detail about the assimilation of Jews in Hellenistic societies throughout the Diaspora examining language, education, religion, philosophy, and also to what various extents Jews were socially integrated in Graeco-Roman societies.
Runeterror
I have not finished my review of the material but I have found this incredibly useful so far, especially with the cross references and appendices. Barclay does a splendid job of defnining the Jews in the Diaspora, providing context and understanding of a very complex time and culture.
Giamah
This was my favorite of all the books for a required class. Excellent shipping on behalf of the company!! Thanks so much.
Ubrise
Although the title of this book is more like a subtitle and thus is not catchy or memorable, 'Jews of the Mediterranean Diaspora etc.', deserves to be widely read and studied by anyone interested in the development of Judaism and early Christianity. John Barclay is consistently even-handed and fairminded in his considerations of literary and archaeological evidence from the Greco-Roman period, describing a vivid picture of the diversity and unity of Jewish communities in Alexandria, Rome, Cyrene, Anatolia and Syria, as well as the shifting fortunes of these communities under the various regimes. A great deal of the pseudepigraphic literature is examined in detail. The chapter on Paul as a Jew in a Hellenistic society, though short, is more enlightening than several books. Barclay's assessments of, and disagreements with, other scholars work are such that scholarly writing could acquire a good reputation if others would emulate them. The style is as accessible as it is informative. Now I wish Mr. Barclay or someone like him would write similar books on the Pre-Exilic, Exilic, and Persian periods. I can dream, can't I?

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