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epub Terry Jones' Medieval Lives (04) by Jones, Terry [Paperback (2005)] download

by Terry Jones

  • ISBN: 056349316X
  • Author: Terry Jones
  • ePub ver: 1796 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1796 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: BBC BOOKS; New Ed edition (2005)
  • Formats: azw doc mobi mbr
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: World
epub Terry Jones' Medieval Lives (04) by Jones, Terry [Paperback (2005)] download

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives is a 2004 television documentary series produced for the BBC. Written and hosted by Terry Jones, each half-hour episode examines a particular Medieval personality.

The episode The Peasant was nominated for Outstanding Writing for Nonfiction Programming at the 2004 Emmy Awards. Dr. Faye Getz acted as consultant for the series.

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives book. Paperback, 240 pages. Published May 5th 2005 by BBC Books (first published February 1st 2004). Terry Jones' Medieval Lives. 0563522755 (ISBN13: 9780563522751).

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives reveals Medieval Britain as you have never seen it before - a vibrant .

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives reveals Medieval Britain as you have never seen it before - a vibrant society teeming with individuality, intrigue and innovation. Terry Jones is best known as a member of Monty Python but he has also written books on medieval England, Chaucer's Knight, the highly acclaimed Who Murdered Chaucer? and Crusades, as well as Terry Jones' Barbarians, which accompanied a major television series he presented in 2006. He is the author of several children's books including Fairy Tales and Fantastic Stories, The Knight and the Squire and The Lady and the Squire.

Terry Jones: Medieval Lives (Dbl DVD) . The Emmy-nominated Medieval Lives by legendary Monty Python star and medieval scholar, Terry Jones, finally arrives on DVD! Terry Jones has been leafing through the history books to find out what the medieval world was really like. What he discovered is a treasure trove of extraordinary stories and characters that challenge the tired traditional stereotypes we all grew up with. Terry Jones brings his inimitable style, a mix of goofy humor and scholarly inquisitiveness, to the subject of the Middle Ages in Terry Jones' Medieval Lives.

In Terry Jones' Medieval Lives, his mission is to rescue the Middle Ages from moth-eaten cliches and well-worn .

In Terry Jones' Medieval Lives, his mission is to rescue the Middle Ages from moth-eaten cliches and well-worn platitudes. Behind the stereotypes of "damsels in distress" and "knights in shining armor," there are wonderfully human stories that bring the period to life. Terry will start with the medieval archetypes-the Knight, Peasant, Damsel, Monk, Outlaw, King, Merchant, and Physician-and in the course of unravelling their role and function will introduce a host of colorful real-life characters, recreating their world by visiting key locations.

This book is published to accompany the television series Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives produced by Oxford Film . Reprinted 2005, 2006 (twice), 2007

This book is published to accompany the television series Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives produced by Oxford Film and Television for BBC Television and first broadcast on BBC2 in 2004. First published in hardback 2004. Reprinted 2005, 2006 (twice), 2007. The moral rights of the authors have been asserted. ISBN-13: 978 0 563 52275 1. Published by BBC Books, Worldwide Ltd, Woodlands, 80 Wood Lane, London W12 0TT. All rights reserved.

Terry Jones' Medieval Lives. Terry Jones’ Barbarians takes a completely fresh approach to Roman history. by Terry Jones · Alan Ereira. Terry Jones' Barbarians. This is the story of the Roman Empire as seen by the Britons, Gauls, Germans, Hellenes, Persians, and Africans

Terry Jones' medieval lives. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on September 4, 2014.

Электронная книга "Terry Jones' Medieval Lives", Alan Ereira, Terry Jones. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Terry Jones' Medieval Lives" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Famous for lampooning the medieval world in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Terry Jones has a real passion for and detailed knowledge of the Middle Ages. In Terry Jones' Medieval Lives, his mission is to rescue the Middle Ages from moth-eaten cliches and well-worn platitudes. Behind the stereotypes of "damsels in distress" and "knights in shining armor," there are wonderfully human stories that bring the period to life. Terry will start with the medieval archetypes—the Knight, Peasant, Damsel, Monk, Outlaw, King, Merchant, and Physician—and in the course of unravelling their role and function will introduce a host of colorful real-life characters, recreating their world by visiting key locations.
Comments (7)

Moronydit
Terry Jones' love of history is well-known, and this book, which seemed to be based on a BBC series of the same name, goes more deeply and detailedly in the richness of late medieval history in English than one would expect. Written with Alan Ereira, parts of pieces of Jones' comedic voice remains in the the text. Separated into the medieval roles, Jones uses these roles to construct a counter-narrative to many of the stereotypes around medieval history through focusing in on specific instances and highlighting specific anecdotes to clarify the his major points.

It is clearly organized, and the focus on specific anecdotes are useful, but definitely feel more cinematic than scholarly. However, there are reasons why Jones' did this that are beyond limits based on the BBC series: Jones has a bone to pick with much of the historigraphy around the Renaissance. As he said in an interview "...And I'm sick to death of that ridiculous assumption that that before the Renaissance human beings had no sense of individuality." Jones aims to illustrate that this is clearly a misunderstanding of self-conception of humanity in the medieval period. The anecdotes persalize things on an individual level. Furthermore, Jones' is good a pointing out that our conceptions of the medieval period are often more based on Victorian misconceptions and projecting violence of the Renaissance and the early modern period back unto medieval period.

The book is particularly good on the selective criterion for understanding the Plantagent kings as well as omissions from the king's list like Louis the first and last, who was ruler during the first Baron's War. It also is particularly strong in the areas about popular medieval conceptions of women. A close reading of Chaucer would have confirmed a lot of what Jones is saying, but he and Ereira do a particularly good job of finding both historical and literary sources to make their point here. A weak point may be on medieval medicine where Jones seems to think that treatments developed in the medieval period that ther roots of some modern treatments were more effective than they were. He does not mention how dangerous a lot of the medical precedures used by Galen are, and then he justifies it by morality rates in modern hospitals due to infection. The two cases aren't really good analogies for severeal reasons: Most of which having to do with the fact we understand what hospital morality is so high, but medieval doctors didn't understand why so many of their leeched patiences died anyway.

While Ian Mortimer's "Time Travellers Guide to Medieval England" show be paired with this as it is much more substantive and should probably be read with this book, Jones light take on history is still substantive enough for the non-specialist to learn significant amounts and for the specialist to be fairly amused.
PanshyR
This rather light-hearted look at the so-called Medieval period of history had something of the feel of a television program about it. And – surprise! – a look at the acknowledgements section reveals that it apparently is, in fact, a companion book to a television series. I’m sorry I missed it.

Despite that, however, it is serious history, even if it does constitute a somewhat rapid overview of the period. Their approach is to discuss the lives of eight types of people you might have run into during the almost five-hundred year period of the middle ages (which they define as having lasted in England from 1066 to 1536).

One of the constant themes is change – for example, in the lives of peasants. During the period the number of slaves declined as slaves were replaced by villeins – people who were obliged to work a certain number of days a week on their masters’ farms and additionally pay rents in the form of a portion of their crops. Over time the rents began to be paid in cash, and people became more free to move to other parts of the country, or to own small farms on their own. The lives of the other types of people changed over the years too – some improving, some getting now better, now worse (damsels, i.e. higher-class women, for example, were treated more tolerantly at some periods than others, and the changes were not uniformly improvements). Even the role of kings, the last of the types of people covered, changed over the period, but at least in their case many of the changes were initiated by the kings themselves, or were, at any rate, due to such good or bad qualities as they possessed. They also point out how much of our judgements of these kings of the past is due to historical records that may have been manipulated by those who came to power after them, so that those who we think of as ‘good’ kings may not have necessarily been perceived as such by the people of their own times.

I learned a lot from this book, and found little in it that contradicted what I have read in much more ‘serious’ histories of the period. If you would like to learn more about the middle ages but are intimidated by long recitals of minute details, this book is a good choice.
Malaris
This is a really good book. Terry Jones is probably best known as a member of Monty Python, but he's also a medieval scholar. Both aspects of his personality -- the comic and the scholar -- show in this book. It's easy to read. It's funny. And it challenges many of the assumptions we make about the people of the medieval period, their lives, their circumstances, and the history they lived through. He has references for his challenges as well, and the book has an extensive bibliography and many footnotes.

As a reader who's long been fascinated by the medieval period, I found this book stimulating and eye-opening in a few areas. (Some of the instances in the book were things I already knew. Some I'd suspected. And some were completely new to my mind.)

I cannot recommend this book too highly. I didn't give it five stars only because of some formatting glitches in the ebook I bought and a few typographical errors and such. It's a truly good book.

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