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epub Channels of Power: The UN Security Council and U.S. Statecraft in Iraq download

by Alexander Thompson

  • ISBN: 0801447186
  • Author: Alexander Thompson
  • ePub ver: 1756 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1756 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 261
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (April 1, 2009)
  • Formats: rtf lrf txt mbr
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Military
epub Channels of Power: The UN Security Council and U.S. Statecraft in Iraq download

policy toward Iraq, and of the informational role of international organizations more generally. Much of the political science literature regards IOs as sources of information, yet remains vague about what information they might provide or under what conditions they can do so effectively. Channels of Power is a brilliant book by a sound academic thinker. So often ivy-covered professors write obtuse material aimed at their own colleagues. This work, while a formal inquiry, is written with a style that any educated person can appreciate.

Thompson, Alexander, 1972-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Security Council - History, United Nations - Iraq, Persian Gulf War, 1991, Iraq War, 2003-2011, United States - Foreign relations - Iraq, Iraq - Foreign relations - United States. Ithaca : Cornell University Press. Cornell University Press. Uploaded by LexW on June 6, 2018. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Channels of Power book . When President George W. Bush launched an invasion of Iraq in March of 2003, he did so without the explicit approval of the Security Council. led Gulf War in 1991.

In Channels of Power, Alexander Thompson surveys . policy toward Iraq, starting with the Gulf War, continuing through the interwar years of sanctions and coercive disarmament, and concluding with the 2003 invasion and its long aftermath

In Channels of Power, Alexander Thompson surveys . policy toward Iraq, starting with the Gulf War, continuing through the interwar years of sanctions and coercive disarmament, and concluding with the 2003 invasion and its long aftermath. He offers a framework for understanding why powerful states often work through international organizations when conducting coercive policies-and why they sometimes choose instead to work alone or with ad hoc coalitions.

Channels of Powersis the rare book that manages to successfully combine sophisticated international relations theory with .

The book’s empirical focus is on the attempts by the United States to coerce Iraq into compliance with its demands, starting with the 1990 Gulf War all the way to the Second Iraq war in 2003. The particular question of interest is why the .

When President George W. Bush launched an invasion of Iraq in March of 2003 .

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The book does not offer any new empirical insights into America’s Iraq .

The book does not offer any new empirical insights into America’s Iraq policy at the Security Council, but then this is not its main aim. Instead, it deploys a particular theoretical lens, institutionalism, through which it explores the reasons why powerful states use or eschew international organizations. It seems likely that had the Security Council authorized the use of force in Iraq in 2003, it would certainly not have been perceived as politically independent, a perception that is central to its ability to transmit such information to other states.

This article argues that explicit Council.

The book’s empirical focus is on the attempts by the United States to coerce Iraq into compliance with its demands, starting with the 1990 Gulf War all the way to the Second Iraq war in 2003

Channels of power: The UN Security Council and . Statecraft in Iraq (Ithaca: Cornell University Press). Published online: 7 November 2009. Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009. The book’s empirical focus is on the attempts by the United States to coerce Iraq into compliance with its demands, starting with the 1990 Gulf War all the way to the Second Iraq war in 2003. has sometimes successfully channeled these efforts through the United Nations Security Council and other international organizations and why it has at other times circumvented these institutions?

When President George W. Bush launched an invasion of Iraq in March of 2003, he did so without the explicit approval of the Security Council. His father's administration, by contrast, carefully funneled statecraft through the United Nations and achieved Council authorization for the U.S.-led Gulf War in 1991. The history of American policy toward Iraq displays considerable variation in the extent to which policies were conducted through the UN and other international organizations.

In Channels of Power, Alexander Thompson surveys U.S. policy toward Iraq, starting with the Gulf War, continuing through the interwar years of sanctions and coercive disarmament, and concluding with the 2003 invasion and its long aftermath. He offers a framework for understanding why powerful states often work through international organizations when conducting coercive policies-and why they sometimes choose instead to work alone or with ad hoc coalitions. The conventional wisdom holds that because having legitimacy for their actions is important for normative reasons, states seek multilateral approval.

Channels of Power offers a rationalist alternative to these standard legitimation arguments, one based on the notion of strategic information transmission: When state actions are endorsed by an independent organization, this sends politically crucial information to the world community, both leaders and their publics, and results in greater international support.

Comments (2)

Nawenadet
I thoroughly enjoyed this read. I felt that it gave a pretty unbiased perspective and told multiple stories in the lead up and crisis in Iraq. This was a book I had to read for a political science course and I actually enjoyed this one.
Aradwyn
Channels of Power is a brilliant book by a sound academic thinker. So often ivy-covered professors write obtuse material aimed at their own colleagues. This work, while a formal inquiry, is written with a style that any educated person can appreciate. The arguments are clearly stated and well delivered. I would say that this book is suitable for any college graduate interested in America's involvement in the Iraq war, and of research merit for PhD's in any related field. Thompson gives us a great book!

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