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epub Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story That Changed the Course of World War II download

by Ben Macintyre

  • ISBN: 1408806002
  • Author: Ben Macintyre
  • ePub ver: 1268 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1268 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 416
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; 1st edition (2010)
  • Formats: lrf lit mbr lrf
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Military
epub Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story That Changed the Course of World War II download

The purpose of the plan-code named Operation Mincemeat-was to deceive the Nazis into thinking that Allied forces were planning to attack southern Europe by way of Greece or Sardinia, rather than Sicily, as the Nazis had assumed, and the Allies ultimately chose

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Operation Mincemeat: The. Packed with the sort of ego-centric toffs who seemed to gravitate towards undercover ops during the war, nicknames like 'Jimbo' and 'Jumbo' makes some of the chapters read like a Dennis Wheatley novel.

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He has worked as the newspaper's correspondent in New York, Paris and Washington

View all . Common terms and phrases. He has worked as the newspaper's correspondent in New York, Paris and Washington. He is the author of seven previous books including Agent Zigzag, the story of wartime double-agent Eddie Chapman, which was shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and the Galaxy British Book Award for Biography of the Year 2008. He lives in London with his wife and three children.

Operation Mincemeat was the most successful wartime deception ever attempted, and certainly the strangest. It hoodwinked the Nazi espionage chiefs, sent German troops hurtling in the wrong direction, and saved thousands of lives by deploying a secret agent who was different, in one crucial respect, from any spy before or since: he was dead. Ben Macintyre, bestselling author of "Agent Zigzag", weaves together private documents, photographs, memories, letters and diaries, as well as newly released material from the intelligence files of MI5 and Naval Intelligence, to tell for the first time the full story of Operation Mincemeat.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Ben Macintyre, bestselling author of Agent Zigzag, weaves together private documents, photographs, memories, letters and diaries, as well as newly released material from the intelligence files of MI5 and Naval Intelligence, to tell for the first time the full story of Operation Mincemeat. Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Updated: 25 Jun 2019, 7:42. THE incredible story of a hoax operation to disguise the 1943 Allied invasion of Sicily is being turned into a film. Operation Mincemeat will reunite actor Colin Firth with Shakespeare In Love director John Madden. One April morning in 1943, a sardine fisherman spotted the corpse of a British soldier floating in the sea off the coast of Spain - and set in motion a chain of events that would change the course of World War Two. Operation Mincemeat was one of the most successful wartime deceptions ever attempted - and certainly the strangest.

Devising the way in which a dead body washed up in Spain in 1943 carrying letters outlining phoney Allied invasion plans might be made believable stretched to the full the perverse imaginations of the famed squad of corkscrew minds who operated from a Whitehall basement under the irascible Admiral Godfrey, and included Ian Fleming. The story has been told, and indeed filmed (as The Man who Never Was ), before but never so completely or so colourfully.

Book by Macintyre, Ben
Comments (7)

Togar
Macintyre does a good job putting the reader right into the action. I was reminded while reading this book that non-fiction can differ from fiction in the number of characters the reader must keep straight. I commend Macintyre's efforts to help in that task by often using the real name alongside the alias. Nevertheless, it could still get a little confusing especially when double agents were involved.

That said, I must add how much I enjoyed reading a bit of history that gets swept under the broad-brush treatment we normally get in viewing world events. It brings to mind the saying of the stage: there's no such thing as small parts, only small actors. Macintyre admits that the Sicily invasion could have been done without this one piece of deception and that no one can prove it had an impact. However, he makes a very strong case for the importance of it. I found how detailed they were in faking their ruse very fascinating. Watching how committed the Germans were to believing the ruse simply because they wanted to surpassed the work that went into creating the lie.

Operation Mincemeat was like reading a mystery that let you know the who the perpetrator was at the beginning and let you accompany him as he developed the intrigue and misleading clues. It's entertaining, astounding, and enlightening. I am now wondering where to go to get to the truth of what is happening in world, national, and even local events.
Feri
The basic facts about the story are easy to find these days, what with the internet, but this book is well worth every cent because it really gets you acquainted with the main characters as three-dimensional people embarking on a long-shot piece of subterfuge.

What's particularly interesting is how the author shows you that the UK intelligence people were thinking very hard about how the enemy thinks. Starting there - like with Hitler's paranoia about a possible British landing at Greece or thereabouts - they could really "sell" the idea of Mincemeat to the Germans. The fact that the whole plan hinged on the ostensibly neutral Spanish makes it even more astonishing that the thing worked.

A story about a different kind of warfare. Very entertaining and human. It's amazing that it's true.
Pameala
An absolute page-turner that adds so much more newly-released/newly-declassified information to "The Man Who Never Was", which most people who would think about buying this book would have seen. So, if that describes you and you are hesitating because you're wondering "why read the book if I've seen the movie?", buy this book! You will learn SO much more! Not that the movie or original book was inaccurate because it took "Hollywood liberties." When the movie and original book were made in the early 1950s, even the Ultra Secret was still classified and top secret, so that entire relationship is completely eliminated from those original stories, as are many things that, due to the Official Secrets Act (U.K.) could not be talked about! So, the book/movie had to work around those obstacles either with "deceptions" and "inventions" of it's own, or leaving things out. The original author Montagu, was the spy who developed and ran the operation, along with a partner, Charles Cholmondeley, who was also for security-related personal reasons, declined to be mentioned in the book or movie. You'll learn how they really got the body (hint: not exactly as in the movie/book) and how Ian Flemming (yes, THAT Ian Flemming!) was himself actively involved in "Operation Mincemeat" (a.k.a. "The Man Who Never Was") along with a host of other now-well known spies-turned-authors, such as Graham Greene, and other notables including the soon-to-be-notorious British traitor-spy, Kim Philby. Ben Macintyre is an established author and a fine writer, including "The Man Who Would Be King." This is a great book for everyone. The effects of "Operation Mincemeat" are still being felt today, and everyone should know about what has been called by historians the single, most important and successful wartime deception in history, rivaled only by the original itself, The Trojan Horse, more than 3,000 years earlier.
Lailace
So I'm biased, or more properly hooked on Macintyre! His writing captures the essence of everything to come within the early paragraphs in almost every one of his books I have read. Mincemeat is no exception. You get the idea very soon which way this story is going to go but you cannot anticipate very far ahead because there is always a new character or some unexpected wrinkle proving " the best laid plans of mice and men..."
Even with the twists and quirks, the scheme has a happy ending unless you were rooting for the Third Reich. It's a great story told by a great storyteller.

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