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epub Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions download

by Mark W. Muesse,The Great Courses

  • ISBN: 159803281X
  • Author: Mark W. Muesse,The Great Courses
  • ePub ver: 1457 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1457 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Teaching Company (2007)
  • Formats: mbr lrf mobi doc
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: learn more about Fulfillment by Amazon
epub Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions download

Not content to study religion merely from books .

Not content to study religion merely from books, Professor Muesse has also observed and participated in these traditions in their native contexts, especially in South Asia. Thus his approach to the study of religion is not solely academic or historical but also reflects a deep respect for religious experience as it is felt and lived. You will explore fascinating aspects of several major world religions at the time of their birth. Average 31 minutes each.

Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions. Now, with 36 Books That Changed the World, a fascinating Great Courses Collection crafted from our extensive library of courses, take a riveting tour of the profound impact of books from thousands of years of history and from civilizations around the globe. 36 Revolutionary Figures of History.

This course was a great overview of a certain subset of religions that arose during the Axial Age, namely those of Asia. A view of mainly eastern religions of the axial age starting from the Arian descend. Dr. Muessse starts by discussing what exactly the Axial Age is, and why it is regarded as a separate period of time and how, generally, religions developed during the Axial Age. Then he gets into specific, focusing first on Zoroaster and the reform started by him. He discusses the basics of the history of the pre-Axial era, leading up to the beginnings of Zoroastrianism. Sep 08, 2012 Bell Wolaver rated it it was amazing.

The Axial Age – a pivotal era between 800 and 200 BCE – saw the rise of many of the world’s religions in Iran, South Asia, and China. On this stirring journey, you’ll learn about the rise of Zoroastrianism in Persia (now Iran); Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism on the Indian subcontinent; and Confucianism and Daoism in China

The Axial Age - a pivotal era between 800 and 200 . I have listed to Professor Muesse's courses on Mindfulness Practice & Hinduism.

The Axial Age - a pivotal era between 800 and 200 . saw the rise of many of the world's religions in Iran, South Asia, and China. On this stirring journey, you'll learn about the rise of Zoroastrianism in Persia (now Iran); Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism on the Indian subcontinent; and Confucianism and Daoism in China. You'll also see how these religions compare, contrast, and contribute to contemporary Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. I always enjoy his courses! I particularly enjoyed the depth and reflection that he was able to give in this lecture series!

How do religions evolve over time? This course offers a rare opportunity to relate your own spiritual questions to a. .What Is the Axial Age? Professor Muesse offers striking insights as he draws you closer to the period between 800 to 200 . an era with notable parallels to our own.

How do religions evolve over time? This course offers a rare opportunity to relate your own spiritual questions to a variety of ancient quests for meaning and transcendence. He helps you think about specific traditions while pondering the common processes of religious development.

Course Lecture Titles What Was the Axial Age? .

Course Lecture Titles What Was the Axial Age? The Noble Ones The World of Zoroaster Zoroaster's Legacy South Asia before the Axial Age The Start of the Indian Axial.

He covers times from the earliest prehistoric indications of human religious practices to the conversion of the Roman Empire to Christianity in the 4th century . People Who Liked Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions Also.

These 24 extraordinary lectures offer you the rare opportunity to relate your own spiritual questions to a variety of ancient quests for meaning and transcendence. Professor Muesse looks at the historical conditions in which the world religions arose and explores how they answered shared metaphysical and human dilemmas. The Axial Age - a pivotal era between 800 and 200 B.C.E. - saw the rise of many of the world's religions in Iran, South Asia, and China. On this stirring journey, you'll learn about the rise of Zoroastrianism in Persia (now Iran); Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism on the Indian subcontinent; and Confucianism and Daoism in China. You'll also see how these religions compare, contrast, and contribute to contemporary Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Through sacred texts, modern scholarship, and thoughts arising from his own personal experiences, Professor Muesse reveals what it meant to be a conscious, morally responsible individual in the Axial Age. You'll enjoy a ringside seat as each founding sage wrestles with moral accountability, the nature of self and ultimate reality, good versus evil, suffering and transcendence - all topics that still puzzle us today.
Comments (5)

Beahelm
As someone with a strange passion for the most ancient world and Zoroastrianism in particular, I have enjoyed this lecture series immensely. Muesse has a nice southern drawl that's very easy to listen to, and his knowledge of thee ancient religions is extremely informative.

I'm one of those people who doesn't care much for Buddhism, so of course the three or four lectures on Buddhism were my least favorite part, but even then they were done superbly and with great care. I would absolutely recommend this audiobook lecture to listen to as you drive around town or on long car trips.
Jay
This Teaching Company course consists of twenty-four 30-mintue lectures on the almost-simultaneous development, from about 800-400 B.C.E., of the concept of the Golden Rule. This singular focus or foundation arose, disconnectedly, in several different religions beset by various social conditions in different parts of the world. History, religion, sociology, and even the study of warfare are interwoven strands in Professor Muesse's compelling journey with us as we attempt to make sense of this seemingly ironic set of coincidences. This is interdisciplinary sleuthing at its best.

I have purchased, studied, and enjoyed the challenge of a number of Teaching Company courses. Prosessor Muesse backs up his compentent and personable lectures with well-organized, printed guidebooks of the course's key points. One learns not only about the cultures of the ancient Greeks, Zoroastrians, Buddhists, Hebrews, Confucianists, Hindus, Jains, and Daoists; one subtly and almost-inexplicably learns more about oneself. This is "a keeper."
Diredefender
Only delivered half of the set.
luisRED
I learned about the phenomenon of the Axial Age in another Great Courses course and was intrigued that so many widely-located regions of the ancient world experienced an "enlightenment" within such a relatively short time-frame.
I had expected to learn which epiphanies came first and from where, and how they might have influenced each other - and I have a special interest in Jewish, Greek Philosophical and Christian thought since I am, after all, a Christian from the West.
But, nope! The professor starts out the series telling me that he will be almost entirely skipping the Axial Enlightenment of half of the ancient world because he doesn't know much about it.
Then he rhapsodizes breathlessly about the Buddha (I flinched every time he pronounced the name in that weird way) for *several* lectures, and comes back to Buddha many times when discussing the other Eastern religions.
I listened to the entire thing, but his chauvinism sucked a lot of the value out of his lectures.
It's a rare Great Courses course that I don't like, but this is one of them. I wish that someone else had written this review before I spent my money and hours on it.
Thetath
The lecture series, “The Great Courses: The Axial Age” by Prof. Mark W. Muesse, talks about the various religious and philosophical movements that developed from the roughly the eleventh century BCE through the eleventh century CE, a period referred to by the philosopher Karl Jaspers as “Die Atzenzeit,” or “The Axial Age. Lecture 1 sets the scene for the entire course and discusses the general characteristics of the Axial Age, such as an increased emphasis on the importance of virtue as a means of spiritual salvation, the belief in an afterlife, and so on. Lecture 2 is about the Noble Ones; Lectures 3 and 4 focus on the Zoroastrian religion of Iran. Lecture 5 talks about South Asian civilizations before the Axial Age, while lecture 6 talks about the beginning of the Indian Axial Age. Lectures 7-10 focus on Hinduism. Lectures 11-15 deal with Buddhism. Lecture 16 is about Jainism. Lecture 17 is an overview of the history of East Asia before the Axial Age, while lecture 18-21 focus on Confucianism, while lectures 22 and 23 are about Taoism and Confucianism, and lecture 24 sums up the course.
I was surprised to learn about that interesting, abstract high god worshipped by the Aryans known as Daus Pitr, or “Father God.” I also had never heard of another early Hindu deity, the Soul of the Bull. I wonder whether the worship of that god evolved into the contemporary custom of worshipping of the bull god, Nandi.
I deduct one star because, while it is true that there are other courses that discuss Judaism and Christianity, I do find it odd that he does not devote a whole lot of time to them in this course since, after all, Jesus and most of the Biblical prophets and patriarchs, with the possible exceptions of Abraham, Isaac, Ishmael and Jacob, would have lived during that time. I will say, though that the Great Courses lecture series about Judaism, called “Great World Religions: Judaism” by Isaiah Gafni, is worth listening to nonetheless and that you may, therefore, want to buy that one as well, along with Prof. Muesse’s equally fascinating series, “Great World Religions: Hinduism.” Regarding how Zoroastrians dispose of their dead, Prof. Muesse is actually wrong in how he explains why Zoroastrians don’t bury their dead. Counter to his claims, the Zoroastrian prohibition against burial of the dead has NOTHING to do with “contaminating the soil.” Traditionally, most Zoroastrians traditionally cremate their dead for two reasons: 1) The fire is a symbol of the divine light of God 2) the smoke from a funeral pyre is believed to carry the soul of a dead person to Heaven. Furthermore, there appear to be several different ways that Zoroastrians despose of the dead. While the most common way for Zoroastrians to despose of their dead is through cremation---since, after all, fire is considered to be a symbol of God and the smoke is said to carry the soul to Heaven---or, as Prof. Michael Fisher points out, in his own Great Courses series, “A History of India,” amongst the Parsis (the Zoroastrians of South Asia), they choose to simply lay the body out and to allow it to decompose naturally and to be eaten by wild animals. When discussing “East Asia During the Axial Age,” Prof. Muesse makes a mistake when discussing a particularly famous example of ancient Chinese art meant to depict the harmonious relationship between Buddhists, Confucians, and Taoists. He incorrectly states that it depicted the Buddha, Confucius and Lao Tzu engaged in a conversation. In reality, this particular work of art, as pointed out by a Taoist scholar in the world religion documentary series, “The Long Search” (hosted by Ronald Eyre), does NOT depict Confucius, Lao Tzu and the Buddha. It depicts a Taoist priest, a Confucian scholar, and a Buddhist monk who were good friends and who were so into their conversation on their way to their homes that they had been having that they had passed up their own houses and who burst out laughing. As I had said before, the painting in question is meant to depict the harmonious relationship that exists between Confucians, Taoists, and Buddhists.
In spite of these mistakes, I would still highly recommend this course because it is very interesting. If you buy it, you will learn a lot. I sure did.

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