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by Alison Plowden

  • ISBN: 0531150003
  • Author: Alison Plowden
  • ePub ver: 1219 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1219 kb
  • Rating: 4.8 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 201
  • Publisher: Franklin Watts; First Edition edition (March 1, 1986)
  • Formats: txt rtf mbr mobi
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
epub Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk download

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on September 11, 2013.

Grey, Jane, Lady, 1537-1554, Suffolk, Dukes of, Brandon family, Nobility. Books for People with Print Disabilities. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Lady Jane Grey was the eldest daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, and his wife, Frances. a b Plowden, Alison (23 September 2004)

Lady Jane Grey was the eldest daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, and his wife, Frances. Frances was the elder daughter of King Henry VIII's younger sister, Mary. Lady Jane's relationship to the House of Tudor and other claimants to the English throne. a b Plowden, Alison (23 September 2004). Grey, Lady Jane (1534–1554), noblewoman and claimant to the English throne". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Lady Jane Grey: She of that unfortunate title, the Nine Days Queen

Lady Jane Grey: She of that unfortunate title, the Nine Days Queen. This is a very straight to the point biography of Lady Jane. In between those events the author successfully untangles a knotted web of ambition, romance, and intrigue that will make most readers' family dramas seem completely inconsequential.

Collectively these books became known as Alison Plowden's "Elizabethan Quartet". The House of Tudor (1976) Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen (1985). Caroline and Charlotte (1989). While working on this series she also published ‘Tudor Women’ (1979). After the quartet she wrote ‘Elizabethan England: life in an age of adventure’ (1982). In addition she wrote many drama and other scripts for BBC radio between 1963 and 1988. The House of Tudor (1976). Marriage with My Kingdom: The Courtships of Queen Elizabeth I (1977). Tudor Women - Queens and Commoners (1979). Elizabeth Regina (1980). Young Victoria (1983). Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen (1985). The Elizabethan Secret Service (1991).

One person found this helpful.

Puts Lady Jane in Context. com User, October 11, 2000. A large portion of this book is about Lady Jane Grey/Dudley, the 9 day Queen of England. However, it doesn't just deal with her. It puts her in her social context within her scheming familiy and how they delt with Royalty and the Tudor court.

Plowden, Alison: Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk (London, 1985). Plowden, Alison: Two Queens in One Isle (Brighton, 1984; Stroud, 2010). Pollitt, Ronald: An ‘Old Practizer’ at Bay: Thomas Bishop and the Northern Rebellion (Northern History, 16, 1980). Porter, Linda: Crown of Thistles: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary, Queen of Scots (London, 2013).

Book Binding:Hardback. Additional Product Features. Unclassifiable: No Bic. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Jane Grey’s tragedy was her royal blood. As Henry VIII’s great-niece she stood perilously close to the throne and from early childhood was used as a pawn in the deadly power game of Tudor politics. Jane was not happy at home – she once famously remarked that she thought herself in hell in her parents’ company – and sought consolation in her studies and the uncompromising Protestantism fashionable in the l550s. Alison Plowden reveals with insight and skill the complex intensity of the woman behind the myth, the brilliantly gifted child who was developing into a passionate, forceful young woman. Biographies Feminism History Nonfiction.

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Traces the connections between the houses of Suffolk and Tudor, describes Lady Jane Grey's nine-day reign as queen of England, and includes profiles of her family members
Comments (6)

tref
I read this book almost 20 years ago, when I rented it from my local library. "Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk" is so much better than Plowden's sequel "Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen" that it shows "Nine Days Queen" as the tired rehash that it is. "Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk" describes Jane beautifully. It also gives plenty of information about her parents, Frances and Henry Grey, and her two younger sisters, Catherine and Mary. Jane's life with her family and her royal Tudor relatives, her subsequent marriage to Guilford Dudley, her brief nine-day reign as England's unwanted Queen, and her following trial and execution are well covered. "Lady Jane Grey and the House of Suffolk" also tells what happened to Jane's surviving family members following her death. This book I'd heartily recommend to anybody who wants a good account of Lady Jane Grey, her life, and her ultimate fate.
BeatHoWin
Author Plowden is very well known for her books concerning the Tudor dynasty of England. This book traces the story of Henry VIII's sister, Mary who first wed the elderly King of France. Upon his swift demise, Mary pursued and won the man she wanted, Charles Brandon. For a while she was banned from court for daring to marry for love, instead of dynastic reasons. From this marriage, her offspring and their descendants would be tightly controlled by the subsequent Tudor monarchs, Edward V, Mary I and Elizabeth I.
While focusing on primarily Lady Jane Grey, the granddaughter of Mary Tudor, all other descendants (primarily female) are also discussed. The complication succession to the throne made a minefield which ruined many lives.
The book is very well written and quotes extensively from original sources. I would recommend it and any other Plowden books to anyone interested in Tudor England.
Jarortr
Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, was not only the brother-in-law of Henry VIII but also his best friend; after the king's own children, Brandon's descendants were named heirs to the crown. The duke's granddaughter, Jane Grey, died for her legacy at the age of sixteen, a Protestant intellectual challenging the accession of the Catholic Mary Tudor. Jane's sister Catherine subsequently ruined her chances to become heir-presumptive to Elizabeth I by her unauthorized marriage to the earl of Hertford -- and then by presuming to give birth to a healthy son (seven of whose close relatives lay buried headless under the chapel in the Tower where he was christened). The Suffolk drama would have been a fitting subject for a Shakespear-ean tragedy.
Rishason
A large portion of this book is about Lady Jane Grey/Dudley, the 9 day Queen of England. However, it doesn't just deal with her. It puts her in her social context within her scheming familiy and how they delt with Royalty and the Tudor court.
It also gives an interesting follow up of what happened to the rest of her familiy following their ill fated bid to get Jane on the throne. It's an interesting book, all the more so because it deals with a group of people, not just Lady Jane.
Rayli
This book concentrates too much about Lady Jane Grey. I know it is called "LADY JANE GREY and the House of Suffolk", but the parts about Jane aren't detailed enough to be a biography, and the rest is too short and foggy to be read as an equal family saga.So close,yet so far.
Garne
It is really helpful in describing and understanding the Tudor period,but it's unbalanced.1 page on Mary Grey,2 chapters on the French Queen,Mary Tudor,1 paragragh on Frances Brandon.There's this uneveness.

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