» » The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760-1830

epub The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760-1830 download

by Hannah Barker

  • ISBN: 0199299714
  • Author: Hannah Barker
  • ePub ver: 1864 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1864 kb
  • Rating: 4.4 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 208
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (November 9, 2006)
  • Formats: lrf docx rtf lrf
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
epub The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760-1830 download

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This study argues that businesswomen were central to urban society and to the operation and development of commerce in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. It presents a rich and complicated picture of lower-middling life and female enterprise in three northern English towns: Manchester, Leeds, and Sheffield.

England 1760-1830 (Oxford U. 2006), xi + 189pp. economy on female economic opportunity has been the subject of considerable debate.

This study argues that businesswomen were central to urban society and to the operation and development of commerce in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The Business of Psychotherapy от 7489. How to Manage Meetings. It presents a rich and complicated picture of lower-middling life and female enterp.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and . This book was a delight to read. It is a skill to weave such a lively narrative from a complex utilisation of sources and Hannah Barker does this with a dash of style.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760-1830. It is a skill to weave such a lively narrative from a complex utilisation of sources and Hannah Barker does this with a dash of style pioneering work. Hannah Barker is at Senior Lecturer in History, University of Manchester.

Christine Wiskin, 2007. Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:60:y:2007:i:3:p:603-604. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Securing Civilization?: The EU, NATO and the OSCE in the Post-9 11 World.

The Business of Women. Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760–1830

The Business of Women. Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760–1830. Oxford University Press, Oxford 2006. Barker’s study, The Business of Women, focuses on the role of women in business in the three northern towns of Leeds, Shefeld, and Manchester. It is Barker’s assumption that it was precisely in these booming towns that women’s involvement in business was most prominent.

Enclosures, common rights, and women: The proletarianization of families in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth . The business of women: Female enterprise and urban development in Northern England 1760-1830. Oxford University Press, 2006.

Enclosures, common rights, and women: The proletarianization of families in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The Journal of Economic History 50 (1), 17-42, 1990. Women's labour force participation and the transition to the male-breadwinner family, 1790-1865. S Horrell, J Humphries.

This study argues that businesswomen were central to urban society and to the operation and development of commerce in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. It presents a rich and complicated picture of lower-middling life and female enterprise in three northern English towns: Manchester, Leeds, and Sheffield. The stories told by a wide range of sources - including trade directories, newspaper advertisements, court records, correspondence, and diaries - demonstrate the very differing fortunes and levels of independence that individual businesswomen enjoyed. Yet, as a group, their involvement in the economic life of towns and, in particular, the manner in which they exploited and facitilitated commercial development, force us to reassess our understanding of both gender relations and urban culture in late Georgian England. In contrast to the traditional historical consensus that the independent woman of business during this period - particularly those engaged in occupations deemed 'unfeminine' - was insignificant and no more than an oddity, businesswomen are presented here not as footnotes to the main narrative, but as central characters in a story of unprecedented social and economic transformation.The book reveals a complex picture of female participation in business. It shows that factors traditionally thought to discriminate against women's commercial activity - particularly property laws and ideas about gender and respectability - did have significant impacts upon female enterprise. Yet it is also evident that women were not automatically economically or socially marginalized as a result. The woman of business might be subject to various constraints, but at the same time, she could be blessed with a number of freedoms, and a degree of independence that set her apart from most other women - and many men - in late Georgian society.

Related to The Business of Women: Female Enterprise and Urban Development in Northern England 1760-1830: