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by Tim Travers

  • ISBN: 1844158896
  • Author: Tim Travers
  • ePub ver: 1291 kb
  • Fb2 ver: 1291 kb
  • Rating: 4.3 of 5
  • Language: English
  • Pages: 342
  • Publisher: Pen and Sword Military; 2009 edition (March 19, 2009)
  • Formats: txt lrf rtf doc
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: Europe
epub The Killing Ground download

The Killing Ground book.

The Killing Ground book. Using an extensive range of unpublished diaries, This book explains why the British Army fought the way it did in the First World War. It integrates social and military history and the impact of ideas to tell the story of how the army, especially the senior officers, adapted to the new technological warfare and asks: was the style of warfare on the Western Front inevitable?

Professor Travers' immensely readable book provides a bridge between the tw. This books explains why the British Army fought the way it did in the First World War.

Professor Travers' immensely readable book provides a bridge between the tw. It integrates social and military history and the impact of ideas to tell the story of how the army, especially the senior officers, adapted to the new technological warfare and asks: Was the style of warfare on the Western Front inevitable? Using an extensive range of unpublished diaries, letters, memoirs and Cabinet and War Office files, Professor Travers explains how and why the ideas, tactics and strategies emerged.

Tim Travers is Professor of History at the University of Calgary. He has written widely on British military history and his books include How the War Was Won: Command and Technology in the British Army on the Western Front 1917-1918. His most recent book is Gallipoli 1915.

Using an extensive range of unpublished diaries, letters, memoirs and Cabinet and War Office files, Professor Travers explains how and why the ideas, tactics and strategies emerged

Using an extensive range of unpublished diaries, letters, memoirs and Cabinet and War Office files, Professor Travers explains how and why the ideas, tactics and strategies emerged. He emphasises the influence of pre-war social and military attitudes, and examines the early life and career of Sir Douglas Haig.

Killing ground Travers, Tim Неизвестно 9781844158898 : This books explains why the British Army fought the way it did in the First World Wa. Killing ground, Travers, Tim. Варианты приобретения.

Killing ground Travers, Tim Неизвестно 9781844158898 : This books explains why the British Army fought the way it did in the First World War. Draws on unpublished diaries, letters, memoirs an.

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An explanation of why the British army fought the way it did in World War I. It integrates social and military history and the impact of ideas to tell the story of how the British army, especially senior officers, adapted to the new technological warfare of the early 20th century. His most recent book is Gallipoli 1915

Tim Travers is Professor of History at the University of Calgary. Country of Publication.

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Khalid Al-Kofahi, Alex Tyrrell, Arun Vachher, Tim Travers, Peter Jackson. A particular style of command: Haig and GHQ, 1916–18. The Killing Ground: The British Army, the Western Front, and the Emergence of Modern Warfare, 1900-1918. A major problem facing online information services is how to index and supplement large document collections with respect to a rich set of categories. We focus upon the routing of case law summarie. More).

This books explains why the British Army fought the way it did in the First World War. It integrates social and military history and the impact of ideas to tell the story of how the army, especially the senior officers, adapted to the new technological warfare and asks: Was the style of warfare on the Western Front inevitable?Using an extensive range of unpublished diaries, letters, memoirs and Cabinet and War Office files, Professor Travers explains how and why the ideas, tactics and strategies emerged. He emphasises the influence of pre-war social and military attitudes, and examines the early life and career of Sir Douglas Haig. The author's analysis of the preparations for the Battles of the Somme and Passchendaele provide new interpretations of the role of Haig and his GHQ, and he explains the reasons for the unexpected British withdrawal in March 1918. An appendix supplies short biographies of senior British officers. In general, historians of the First World War are in two hostile camps: those who see the futility of lions led by donkeys on the one hand and on the other the apologists for Haig and the conduct of the war. Professor Travers' immensely readable book provides a bridge between the two.
Comments (2)

Cordanara
This is a well-organized, well-written account of how the British Army, conditioned by two hundred years of fighting colonial brush-fire wars, adapted to modern war in the early twentieth century. Mr. Travers looks first at the "Edwardian Army" which establishes a base-line for his study. The majority of the book discusses that army's transition during the Great War, first from colonial policing to fighting a major war involving movement and major combat actions, then from a war of movement to trench warfare. Travers then discusses the British Army's struggle to re-establish a war of movement in the final phase of the war. He argues that the British Army was actually fighting two wars, 1914 - 1918: a hidden internal war between leaders of the army officer corps establishment with their prewar ideas versus those officers who understood the encroaching reality of technological change; and the open "real" war against the Central Powers. The Epilogue, which compares the field performance of the French, German, and British armies, justifies the cost of the book.
Virtual
I read Tim Travers' The Killing Groud: The British Army, The Western Front & The Emergence of Modern War 1900-1918 recently for a PhD course I'm taking on World War I. The book closely examines the development of the British Army prior to World War I, and how it was used during the conflict. Travers paints a deservedly unflattering portrait of Sir Douglas Haig, who throughout the war stuck doggedly to the lessons he had learned in the pre-war army. This is one of the reasons why the casualty rates were so high for the British in World War I. Haig was essentially employing Napoleonic era tactics to modern industrial warfare. This, coupled with the cult of the offensive that had been drummed into him, along with most other World War I generals of various nationalities, added to the tragedy. Travers details the planning and execution of the deadly Somme campaign, in which thousands of British soldiers were expected to facilitate a breakthrough in the German lines, but instead died en masse. Travers concludes with a wonderful chapter dealing with the British official history and how various pressures and attitudes came to shape the narrative of the war in the history books.

All told, this is a fascinating study of a flawed military command and needless human sacrifice on an unimaginable scale. These are issues that cut at the heart of the British wartime experience, and Britain is still trying to understand them 100 years later. I also highly recommend Robin Prior and Trevor Wilson's Passchendaele: The Untold Story as a follow up to this work. The book covers the summer 1917 campaign in Flanders and compliments this work very well.

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